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Lucid Releases Video Foreshadowing Air’s Crazy 1/4-Mile Acceleration

Will Lucid Dream Edition set a new world record soon? It appears that’s what it’s suggesting.

Many electric car startups have touted more range and faster acceleration than Tesla’s vehicles. They’ve come and gone, but no company has succeeded yet, aside from the Porsche Taycan giving the Model S a run for its money on the acceleration front. However, Lucid has some key advantages that make it seem like it will be able to pull it off. The automaker shared a video on Twitter to tease its “new benchmark” time in the quarter mile.

Lucid may or may not become a successful, high-volume, mass-market automaker. At this point, we don’t even know if the Lucid Air will come to market, though we believe it will, and we sure hope we’re right. Whether or not Lucid is largely successful in the near future doesn’t matter here, however. All that matters is if the company can actually pull off its range and acceleration claims in the real world.

So far, we have heard that the Lucid Air has a crazy 517-mile range. We’ve also heard it can easily out-accelerate the quickest Tesla Model S. The company’s latest video below doesn’t show the Model S or even the Air. Instead, it just shows a track, some in-car POV shots, and a timer counting down. More specifically, it’s the Lucid Air Dream Edition at the prized Sonoma Speedway in California.

Similar to the range video Lucid shared previously, the counter stops before it gets to the final result. It appears to go as low as 10.48 seconds, which would be the car’s quarter-mile time. However, we know it will have to be much better than that. Can it beat the Model S’ time of 10.452? Fortunately, Lucid will reveal the results on September 2, 2020, ahead of the car’s official unveiling.

Stay tuned in to InsideEVs for all the details. Lucid plans to officially unveil the Air on September 9, 2020. In the meantime, leave us a comment.

Source: Lucid Motors

This article originally appeared on Inside EVs.

BlindPass

Member
Jul 23, 2020
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369
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...and by the time they are making / selling them in quantity, what will Tesla's range and 0-60 be?

Why do they all keep skating to where the puck was?
Where the puck was, as in Tesla has something better already on the road? That’s an interesting narrative given the common objection here that the Air is yet to be an actual option. The legend of the next S, a hypothetical prototype, is growing, but as far as we know, Lucid also is working on an Air that would compete.

From what’s been released about Lucid, Tesla is going to have to diverge from their ethos to compete in the segment that the Lucid Air is targeting. Tesla has gravitated towards bringing EV to the masses, focused on lean production cost-cutting and robo taxis utilitarian interiors. And Lucid is unlikely to quickly gain any market share in middle-market EVs that the 3 and Y dominate.

I hope Tesla does improve the S. Multiple options is a great thing. Hopefully both are priced under the Taycan Turbo S.
 

Uncle Paul

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2013
6,254
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Canyon Lake,CA
Gonna be a wild ride!.

Understand Tesla has a developmental 3 Motor PLAID! wide body Model S in the works. Might hear something about it on Battery day if Tesla wants to get the performance focus back on them. They also have an even quicker New Coupe in the pipeline.
 

BlindPass

Member
Jul 23, 2020
536
369
Florida
Yep. That is the puck that Lucid will have to skate towards if they want anything other than laurels for a few days.
Lucid’s yet to be released models are to skate towards Tesla’s yet to be released Plaid S? What a time!

The Air’s purported range is on a smaller battery pack than anticipated, and they have long mentioned a tri-motor vehicle. I could see them having a Plaid equal, just as real as the Plaid S is real.
 

El joe

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Jan 29, 2019
399
269
Bay Area, CA
Still feels like all these other EV companies, particularly those that are starting as EV companies and not like a Bolt or ID.3/4, will suffer from lack of charging infrastructure, ultimately. Having a nice car is great and all, but having to rely on EA and all third-party chargers will suck unless they find a way to become reliable. Seems unlikely.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: BlindPass

SageBrush

REJECT Fascism
May 7, 2015
12,251
15,178
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Still feels like all these other EV companies, particularly those that are starting as EV companies and not like a Bolt or ID.3/4, will suffer from lack of charging infrastructure, ultimately. Having a nice car is great and all, but having to rely on EA and all third-party chargers will suck unless they find a way to become reliable. Seems unlikely.
I doubt Lucid would ever admit it, but the outrageous range spec is a nod to that reality.
 

BlindPass

Member
Jul 23, 2020
536
369
Florida
Still feels like all these other EV companies, particularly those that are starting as EV companies and not like a Bolt or ID.3/4, will suffer from lack of charging infrastructure, ultimately. Having a nice car is great and all, but having to rely on EA and all third-party chargers will suck unless they find a way to become reliable. Seems unlikely.

80% of charging is done at home. It’s not a significant problem now, let alone in the future as batteries improve and charging continues to get built.

Your narrative is even weaker than what ICE lovers used against Tesla back when I bought my first S. Not even 200 miles of real range, not many SuperChargers, and yet not an issue for the vast majority of car utilization.
 

redalf

Member
May 11, 2020
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60
Spokane, WA
Your narrative is even weaker than what ICE lovers used against Tesla back when I bought my first S. Not even 200 miles of real range, not many SuperChargers, and yet not an issue for the vast majority of car utilization.

I feel like we're in such an odd spot with EVs and Tesla fans (of which I am definitely one). I remember having all these arguments with Tesla naysayers for the longest time (and still); but now every time a new EV is on the horizon, all the Tesla fans come out with all the stuff we used to have to argue against when pointing out how great Tesla's are (range anxiety, charging infrastructure, price, market share...)

Auto sales is a big market, and EV sales are a minor part of it, there's still A LOT of room for A LOT of different vehicles to grow this segment without being any kind of threat to Tesla, not every vehicle has to be the fastest, longest, quickest to charge, biggest selling vehicle of all time, etc to find success.
 

El joe

Member
Jan 29, 2019
399
269
Bay Area, CA
80% of charging is done at home. It’s not a significant problem now, let alone in the future as batteries improve and charging continues to get built.

Your narrative is even weaker than what ICE lovers used against Tesla back when I bought my first S. Not even 200 miles of real range, not many SuperChargers, and yet not an issue for the vast majority of car utilization.
Cool, my first unwarranted attack. As someone who owns a Bolt and does 95% of my charging at home, I tend to agree with you, despite your childish tone. But that five percent of charging outside my home is met with chargers that frequently don’t work and have awful track records, making long-distance travel an extremely-risky proposition in my Bolt.
 

BlindPass

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Jul 23, 2020
536
369
Florida
Cool, my first unwarranted attack. As someone who owns a Bolt and does 95% of my charging at home, I tend to agree with you, despite your childish tone. But that five percent of charging outside my home is met with chargers that frequently don’t work and have awful track records, making long-distance travel an extremely-risky proposition in my Bolt.
I’m attacking your rationale, which is warranted.

The utility gained from differences in charging infrastructure is exaggerated, facilitated by the range hysteria once promoted by Tesla Shorts and ICE. “Ultimately“ it won’t be an issue at all as battery technology improves and charging continues to get built out.