News

Tesla Releases $2,000 Model Y Acceleration Boost, Shaves Half Second

The acceleration boost only applies to the non-performance Tesla Model Y Long Range.

The new Tesla Model Y acceleration boost is a paid software upgrade that’s now available for the Model Y Long Range, which is the current $49,990 “base” model and only available with all-wheel drive. You can purchase the update using your Tesla Mobile app, as long as you have software version 2020.36. Just visit the ‘Upgrades’ tab. 

The Acceleration Boost costs $2,000 and drops the Model Y Long Range’s zero-to-60-mph time from the current 4.8 seconds down to 4.3 seconds, though it will probably prove even more impressive in real-world applications. However, think hard before you click ‘ADD.’ Tesla will not issue refunds for the upgrade after 48 hours of the time of purchase.

Tesla has done this same thing in the past. In December 2019, it offered a paid acceleration boost upgrade for the Model 3 Dual Motor AWD that also shaved the 0-60-mph time down by .5 seconds, from 4.4 to 3.9.

The best part about all of this is that Tesla has the ability to offer such upgrades due to its over-the-air software update capability. You don’t even have to leave your couch to get this acceleration boost, though you do have to have a huge chunk of cash sitting in your checking account.

Interestingly, though Tesla says this upgrade will reduce your Model Y’s zero-to-60-mph time by a half-second, that wasn’t the case with the Model 3. In fact, it was much better. Some owners actually posted videos showing an improvement of almost one full second after downloading the update. 

Ford just announced that its upcoming Mustang Mach-E has the quickest acceleration in its class, at 3.7 seconds from zero to 100kph. However, the Model Y Performance already matches that. While the Acceleration Boost isn’t available on the Performance Y, Tesla is continuing to prove that as soon as a competitor says its car will outperform a Tesla, it can rise to the occasion and make that more difficult. We just saw it in top form when Tesla debuted its Model S Plaid, which the company says will top all the Lucid Air Dream Edition’s incredible specs.

This article originally appeared on Inside EVs.

yktech

New Member
Sep 27, 2020
1
0
Whitehorse
Harley Davidson has an all electric motorcycle which sells in Canada for starting price of $37,985. I would love to see a Tesla motorcycle. I would purchase a Harley LiveWire but the cost is too high. Please put me on the list of motorcycles are on the table for the future. Thank you
 

CyberB

Member
Nov 25, 2019
81
72
Phoenix
I got the the AWD Perf. without PUP model Y. If I had to do it all over again, I would purchase AWD Non-performance and upgrade to boost. 3.5 seconds is overkill and 4.3 is damn fast. I probably wouldn't get the FSD either, it's waste of time and money. Standard autopilot - lane keeper and adaptive cruise - is all I need and use. Hopefully Musk will come through on that FSD upgrade this year...
 
  • Like
Reactions: ecobon

bgrynn1873

Member
Jul 10, 2020
71
20
Wellington FL
Cause you USE the extra power for acceleration which is why mileage will go down, duh,

If everything stays the same and you actually have more power this almost certainly means less range. Unless physics just doesn't apply. I assume they can achieve this via tweaking the software on the motor. Even if they tweaked this for the top range it is probably impossible to keep things similar.


Now if you are able to keep everything the same then the update is not as good as people think. For them to achieve any gains it means the motors and power consumption are higher then before you did the upgrade.

Tesla can't avoid physics so for a lot people it's more of a case of what are the trade offs to get more power.
 

shaggyya

Member
Aug 25, 2020
6
2
Omaha
Purchased and it is fun but my thought was the same as above. The power to the throttle is definitely different..Wish they would have kept the standard mode instead of just doing chill/sport now but little things I guess...It's worth the fun
 

AFN1

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
6
Los Angeles
Purchased and it is fun but my thought was the same as above. The power to the throttle is definitely different..Wish they would have kept the standard mode instead of just doing chill/sport now but little things I guess...It's worth the fun

Are you saying it is now more difficult to accelerate slowly in sport than it was in standard mode? Is that because now less pedal travel equals more acceleration?How dramatic of a change is it, would you mind elaborating?
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
880
1,055
Delaware
Are you saying it is now more difficult to accelerate slowly in sport than it was in standard mode? Is that because now less pedal travel equals more acceleration?How dramatic of a change is it, would you mind elaborating?
I have no issues maintaining acceptable levels of efficiency after the boost upgrade. The people stating range will decrease probably haven't bought it. As long as I'm not driving aggressive, my wh/mi is the exact same as prior to the purchase. My drive to work is the same consumption as it was the last 3 weeks.
 

Brando

Active Member
Sep 27, 2016
2,875
2,000
Bainbridge Island, WA
Thinking about performance ... why I never saw a need for more than 4 cylinder turbo charged.
Passing & getting onto highways.

24-27 mpg around town
36 mpg on the highways
that from a 1989 (better than my 1976 Saab +15% mileage +1/3 more power)

Waste just the way we do things - for some anyway. Don't Ads work great ?
 
Last edited:

MY-Y

Member
Mar 4, 2020
883
917
MD
I have a couple of questions for those who have bought this. My AWD's power bar doesn't hit max until 40 MPH.

1. Does your power bar go to max right off the line now?
2. After 40 MPH, is the power the AWD, or is it higher at all speeds like it is for the M3?
3. After you get used to it, is the new pedal mapping just as easy to drive gently, or is it too aggressive?

Thanks. I suspect I'll have to give it a 48 hour try myself, but appreciate the input.
 

bgrynn1873

Member
Jul 10, 2020
71
20
Wellington FL
I have no issues maintaining acceptable levels of efficiency after the boost upgrade. The people stating range will decrease probably haven't bought it. As long as I'm not driving aggressive, my wh/mi is the exact same as prior to the purchase. My drive to work is the same consumption as it was the last 3 weeks.

Here is where I am having a problem with people saying it doesn't effect their range. If what your saying is true this means that the boost must be at higher levels.

We are TALKING ABOUT THE SAME MOTORS since this isn't an actual part swap. so this must mean higher RPM's on the same motor. In electric motors you gain efficiency when you run it less the max rpm and HP. In some case a lot.

What everyone is saying makes no sense faster with same motors means less efficient. You may choose to drive easier but that also means you would have saved even more without the boost.

If what I am saying is not true then the boost is simply just wishful thinking and not much of a gain for 2k.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: MY-Y

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
880
1,055
Delaware
If what I am saying is not true then the boost is simply just wishful thinking and not much of a gain for 2k.
My Dragy graphs show that the power is pretty much instant and immediate, when you floor it. I don't know anything about the Tesla software and ECU tuning, but I would have to believe they have more aggressive maps for wide open throttle situations compared to partial throttle situations and this would explain the normal levels of efficiency.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mark95476

frankvb

Supporting Member
Feb 29, 2020
840
517
San Diego, CA
We are TALKING ABOUT THE SAME MOTORS since this isn't an actual part swap. so this must mean higher RPM's on the same motor. In electric motors you gain efficiency when you run it less the max rpm and HP. In some case a lot.
It seems you are trying to apply ICE engine logic to an electric motor. RPM is directly coupled to speed since there is a fixed gear transmission. The amount of power generated by the motor is a function of how much you press the accelerator, that's why energy usage is not impacted in case you drive exactly the same as before enabling the boost.
 

bgrynn1873

Member
Jul 10, 2020
71
20
Wellington FL
It seems you are trying to apply ICE engine logic to an electric motor. RPM is directly coupled to speed since there is a fixed gear transmission. The amount of power generated by the motor is a function of how much you press the accelerator, that's why energy usage is not impacted in case you drive exactly the same as before enabling the boost.

I am actually using my logic on what I know about electric motors for industrial use. It makes a lot sense that Tesla puts in a electric motor capable of handling a lot more. We all know this do this because this software update actually exists now.

I am also pretty sure we could see a lot more performance out these motors but there would be big trade offs.

https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/04/f15/10097517.pdf
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: EVDRVN and MY-Y