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Tesla Model Y Firmware Hides Upcoming New Efficiency Package

Will it get another range boost beyond the current 326 miles (525 km)?

According to the Tesla hacker Green (@greentheonly), the 2020.44.15 version of the Model Y‘s firmware includes a new, undisclosed “efficiency package.”

The newest Tesla model, which entered the market earlier this year, has recently received an update and range increased by 3.2-4.1% depending on the version. If there are more efficiency tweaks, Model Y might go even further than the current 326 miles (525 km) in the case of the Long Range AWD version.

Other Tesla models also received a range increase. In the case of Tesla Model 3 specifically, the Long Range versions of the car are reportedly equipped with more energy-dense batteries (82 kWh packs).

We guess that it’s only a matter of time when we learn that the Tesla Model Y is also getting the new, more energy-dense batteries, which alone is worth a few percent of more range.

Anyway, it’s really nice to see that the manufacturer is relentlessly pushing the boundaries forward.

This article originally appeared on Inside EVs.

Reeler

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I am holding off for the 82KW battery with the new Panasonic chemistry. Not clear to me if that will give even more range once it is put in a Long Range AWD. Anyone know?
 

MikeHolliday

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Wow, my MYP gained 0
The extended range update my Model Y would show 254 mile with an 80% charge. The morning after the update my Model Y displayed 266 miles. I was like wow... The Charge setting had not been change... A day later the car displays 254 miles at 80%. So, did it lower due to my driving habits? It is my understanding that the car is actually looking at my wH usage to determine range...
 

pt19713

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I am holding off for the 82KW battery with the new Panasonic chemistry. Not clear to me if that will give even more range once it is put in a Long Range AWD. Anyone know?
I wouldn't delay an order on a low probability rumor. If you review Tesla's 2021 EPA certification data, the LR Y isn't getting the 82 kWh battery.

We're well past the build date cutoff listed in the rumor and there's no 82 kWh.
 

pt19713

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I hope so after watching this YouTube video -
Something is off. In the middle of the video, Alex mentions the Y having an efficiency of 260 wh/mi. That should equate to 288 miles fully drained, or 276 at 0%. The Y didn't get close to that. The final efficiency numbers weren't posted but the Y would have to have 320 wh/mi to get 234 miles fully drained, or 305 wh/mi at 0%.

My car in 40F temps at 75 mph, 1 passenger, 60 lbs of luggage, heat on, 2 seat warmers, gets 290 wh/mi. This test was in 60F weather with the AC on, but good weather conditions. I don't know why the Y got such a low range unless the BMS isn't calibrated properly.
 
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mark95476

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One thing that's a given: the Tesla will always have the best efficiency.


Something is off. In the middle of the video, Alex mentions the Y having an efficiency of 260 wh/mi. That should equate to 288 miles fully drained, or 276 at 0%. The Y didn't get close to that. The final efficiency numbers weren't posted but the Y would have to have 320 wh/mi to get 234 miles fully drained, or 305 wh/mi at 0%.

My car in 40F temps at 75 mph, 1 passenger, 60 lbs of luggage, heat on, 2 seat warmers, gets 290 wh/mi. This test was in 60F weather with the AC on, but good weather conditions. I don't know why the Y got such a low range unless the BMS isn't calibrated properly.
 

pt19713

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One thing that's a given: the Tesla will always have the best efficiency.
Unfortunately efficiency doesn't matter when the Ford has a big advantage in the battery size. Obviously this will change when Tesla releases the 4680 cells. Ford will then be a few years behind in terms of overall range, but for now, Ford has a good start mostly because they aren't gaming the EPA range rating. If Tesla advertised their rating as 290-300 miles, things wouldn't be as bad but to claim 326 miles with a heavy dose of urban cycles being required, well, that's just poor marketing on their part.
 

mark95476

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I'm sure Tesla can increase the size of their battery pack (to get increased highway range), if they really need to. I suppose they did the cost (affects profit, competitiveness) and weight (affects range) research for each range target. Tesla has the best costs for batteries so it must have been a bit painful for Ford to include such a large battery (~same kWh as MS/MX).

I expect Tesla to size their 4680 "packs" to keep the existing ranges, but we'll see. I know I would opt for the largest battery pack to get the increased range, if available. There's more options and competition in Europe so I have high expectations that Berlin will produce something special for their MY.


Unfortunately efficiency doesn't matter when the Ford has a big advantage in the battery size. Obviously this will change when Tesla releases the 4680 cells. Ford will then be a few years behind in terms of overall range, but for now, Ford has a good start mostly because they aren't gaming the EPA range rating. If Tesla advertised their rating as 290-300 miles, things wouldn't be as bad but to claim 326 miles with a heavy dose of urban cycles being required, well, that's just poor marketing on their part.
 

pt19713

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I'm sure Tesla can increase the size of their battery pack (to get increased highway range), if they really need to. I suppose they did the cost (affects profit, competitiveness) and weight (affects range) research for each range target. Tesla has the best costs for batteries so it must have been a bit painful for Ford to include such a large battery (~same kWh as MS/MX).

I expect Tesla to size their 4680 "packs" to keep the existing ranges, but we'll see. I know I would opt for the largest battery pack to get the increased range, if available. There's more options and competition in Europe so I have high expectations that Berlin will produce something special for their MY.
Yeah, people are forgetting that the Y essentially has battery tech from over 3 years ago since it's piggybacking on the Model 3. For Ford to come in to compare against the Y, it's good indicator that the Y is still fine as is but for them to take back the lead, the 4680 cell is needed. Then it'll be Ford's turn in 2-3 years to release their next battery technology upgrade.
 
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TomServo

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I'm sure Tesla can increase the size of their battery pack (to get increased highway range), if they really need to. I suppose they did the cost (affects profit, competitiveness) and weight (affects range) research for each range target. Tesla has the best costs for batteries so it must have been a bit painful for Ford to include such a large battery (~same kWh as MS/MX).

I expect Tesla to size their 4680 "packs" to keep the existing ranges, but we'll see. I know I would opt for the largest battery pack to get the increased range, if available. There's more options and competition in Europe so I have high expectations that Berlin will produce something special for their MY.
Another thing to consider is Tesla's SC network has to be taken into account. If you don't need to buy and carry around a HUGE battery pack for the occasional road trip, why would you. Let the "GRID" be your fuel tank. The old paradigm of the "bigger the gas tank, the better" is probably at play here. Just because you have a 40 gallon gas tank doesn't mean you have to fill it. But you can't do the same with a battery. I'd love to see a several hundred-mile road trip when folks test these cars and see who does better. Just a thought
 
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LionelHutz

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I expect Tesla to size their 4680 "packs" to keep the existing ranges, but we'll see. I know I would opt for the largest battery pack to get the increased range, if available. There's more options and competition in Europe so I have high expectations that Berlin will produce something special for their MY.

This would be a mistake. Perceived range anxiety is probably the biggest reason people don't buy Teslas (setting aside quality control issues). A 3/Y with a real-world 400 mile range would be an absolute game changer.
 

mark95476

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Tesla has already changed the game and I get the feeling that other OEMs are struggling to keep-up. Berlin and Austin coming online will only apply additional pressure.

I think Tesla has already put stakes in the ground for dramatically increased range with the Roadster, Model S Plaid+, and tri-motor CyberTruck. It won't be super difficult for Tesla to build a larger pack for the 3/Y, if it's really needed.

Sustained highway range isn't "real world" in my book. It's the very definition of artificial. The only way I can get sustained ~75 mph highway speeds for hundreds of continuous miles is out on a freeway in the middle of nowhere at odd hours when others are generally home or sleeping. Some auto reviewers need to rely on a closed private track to run highway range tests. There are hyper-milers that travel 100+ miles daily, but they're exceptionally rare even in the Bay Area where real estate prices has forced many away. Their average speed isn't anything near 75 mph, either.


This would be a mistake. Perceived range anxiety is probably the biggest reason people don't buy Teslas (setting aside quality control issues). A 3/Y with a real-world 400 mile range would be an absolute game changer.
 
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mark95476

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Yup. Fortunately, we have Bjorn who's been doing this sort of testing for years. He has a 1000 km challenge spreadsheet with a bunch of vehicles.

The very unfortunate thing is that it's really only relevant to northern Europe as they have Tesla's SC network and many other DC fast chargers. Any vehicle that can't use Tesla SC network will probably get spanked in this sort of test.

Another thing to consider is Tesla's SC network has to be taken into account. If you don't need to buy and carry around a HUGE battery pack for the occasional road trip, why would you. Let the "GRID" be your fuel tank. The old paradigm of the "bigger the gas tank, the better" is probably at play here. Just because you have a 40 gallon gas tank doesn't mean you have to fill it. But you can't do the same with a battery. I'd love to see a several hundred-mile road trip when folks test these cars and see who does better. Just a thought