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See New Photos of Model X Plaid Interior

Tesla’s upcoming “Plaid” version of its flagship Model S and Model X vehicles will come with interior improvements.

Photos posted to Twitter of an updated Model X interior offers a good look at the changes.

Twitter user @WholeMarsBlog spotted a Plaid Model X near the automaker’s Fremont, Calif. factory area.

Tesla has one of the most well-equipped interiors among all cars. An important piece of that is a large touchscreen in the middle of the dash and an infotainment system that allows owners to watch movies and play video games.

The updated interior will bring a similar experience to passengers in the back seat.

The photos posted show a second-row screen, about 8-inches. It’s thought that this touchscreen will allow passengers to choose their own content. Passengers in the backseat will also have access to cupholders and USB-C ports.

It was announced last week that Tesla’s infotainment system would receive a performance boost. Model S and Model X vehicles will be powered by AMD’s RDNA 2 graphics, the same found in the PlayStation 5.

The Plaid vehicles will be Tesla’s top-of-the-line, capable of traveling from 0-60 mph in 2.5 seconds. Tesla announced plans this week to cancel the Model S Plaid+, an even speedier version of the super-fast flagship for the electric vehicle company. Chief Executive Elon Musk said there’s “no need” because “Plaid is just so good.”

PDX-Y

Member
May 24, 2021
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Portland, OR
I don't know why they are forcing people to pay for a rear screen that they don't want and may never use. It should be an option.
It pretty much is an option. Plaid is the "super luxury" variant of what is now their luxury option. The "base" car for consumers in this market is effectively the Model Y now.

Obviously every individual has different things they want in a car, but they can't cater to every possible configuration. The nature of six figure top-end vehicles is that vendors tend to throw all the gizmos in, because buyers at this end of the spectrum generally aren't interested in nickle and diming individual features.
 

jbcarioca

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2015
5,244
25,464
It pretty much is an option. Plaid is the "super luxury" variant of what is now their luxury option. The "base" car for consumers in this market is effectively the Model Y now.

Obviously every individual has different things they want in a car, but they can't cater to every possible configuration. The nature of six figure top-end vehicles is that vendors tend to throw all the gizmos in, because buyers at this end of the spectrum generally aren't interested in nickle and diming individual features.
Have you ever priced a Porsche. They make almost everything optional, rather similarly to US cars of the 1960's.
My Porsches both had MSRP's about 60% above 'base' price. The Japanese and, alter, Korean builders introduced the all-inclusive practices.

The Tesla practice works very well in practice since the true options are color/interior style and wheels/tires only with not many of those. FSD is not really an options since it is enablement of an already existing capability. Everything else is software upgrades.

From a production quality and cost perspective variants are inherently inefficient, so Tesla just does not do it.

The versions, as we all know, are primarily battery size/type, with different suppliers also. Those do make a big difference but they're also batched in production to minimize errors and inefficiency.

The thing we cannot know with absolute certainty is what the marginal cost actually is for all the screens and processors for games and other things. Clearly they aren't cheap. The question is whether the production impacts of variations might be vs the marginal cost of unused features.

I have never once played a video game in a car, nor have I ever used the 'Easter eggs'. The extra screen in the rear will probably never be use in my car since I almost never carry rear seat passengers. I wonder how much could be saved by eliminating such features? Overall, I'll guess much less than the component cost would make it seem to be.
 

jboy210

Supporting Member
Dec 2, 2016
5,089
3,156
Northern California
The new seats look nice.
Have you ever priced a Porsche. They make almost everything optional, rather similarly to US cars of the 1960's.
My Porsches both had MSRP's about 60% above 'base' price. The Japanese and, alter, Korean builders introduced the all-inclusive practices.

The Tesla practice works very well in practice since the true options are color/interior style and wheels/tires only with not many of those. FSD is not really an options since it is enablement of an already existing capability. Everything else is software upgrades.

From a production quality and cost perspective variants are inherently inefficient, so Tesla just does not do it.

The versions, as we all know, are primarily battery size/type, with different suppliers also. Those do make a big difference but they're also batched in production to minimize errors and inefficiency.

The thing we cannot know with absolute certainty is what the marginal cost actually is for all the screens and processors for games and other things. Clearly they aren't cheap. The question is whether the production impacts of variations might be vs the marginal cost of unused features.

I have never once played a video game in a car, nor have I ever used the 'Easter eggs'. The extra screen in the rear will probably never be use in my car since I almost never carry rear seat passengers. I wonder how much could be saved by eliminating such features? Overall, I'll guess much less than the component cost would make it seem to be.
I suspect you are right about the cost being minimal. And if all cars have the same equipment there are savings from quantity purchases, ease of assembly, parts stocked, etc. This goes all the way back to Henry Ford with the Model T that came in any color you wanted, as long as it was black. That enabled Ford to force suppliers to give them massive discounts on lots of black paint.
 
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jbcarioca

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Feb 3, 2015
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I am just curious as to why they invest in silly things such as gaming hardware when basic features such as good 360 camera view or rear cross traffic alert are missing. 😒
Check the new Model S, which has 360 vision for drivers. Still, were FSD to be a level 4 reality right now the 'driver' would not need access to that view anyway. In the meantime I'm happy they've finally done that. After all the cost is really nothing at all since the displays data is already there and so is the processor requirement to make the display. Essentially zero cost to do it.
 

s373n

Member
Jun 7, 2021
21
14
USA
Check the new Model S, which has 360 vision for drivers. Still, were FSD to be a level 4 reality right now the 'driver' would not need access to that view anyway. In the meantime I'm happy they've finally done that. After all the cost is really nothing at all since the displays data is already there and so is the processor requirement to make the display. Essentially zero cost to do it.
Unfortunately it appears that this is only available with FSD though... It's standard on quite a few vehicles, I have it on my Mercedes GLE53 and it makes a huge difference parking in tight spots especially when the car is driven by a valet (MB has the camera views done in a outstandingly perfect way).
 

jboy210

Supporting Member
Dec 2, 2016
5,089
3,156
Northern California
I am just curious as to why they invest in silly things such as gaming hardware when basic features such as good 360 camera view or rear cross traffic alert are missing. 😒
The cameras are there for FSD. They got security for "free" by taping into the feeds. A 360 "bird's eye" view would require a dedicated camera in the nose of the car to see curbs in front of the car, etc. Not, that Tesla should not do that, but a camera used just for parking is not their style.

Personally, I want a HUD. That keeps the driver's eyes outside and puts the speed and distance to the next turn out where the driver is looking.
 

s373n

Member
Jun 7, 2021
21
14
USA
Regarding the ventilated seats, is it confirmed that all seats have a ventilation system or just perforated leather so it breaths?

Had the same question, someone pointed out that the answer is thankfully yes, it's shown under Comfort (item #4):

shot.png
 

imola.zhp

Member
Jul 13, 2020
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Memphis
Unfortunately it appears that this is only available with FSD though... It's standard on quite a few vehicles, I have it on my Mercedes GLE53 and it makes a huge difference parking in tight spots especially when the car is driven by a valet (MB has the camera views done in a outstandingly perfect way).

Its on our 2015 Nissan Leaf SL that isn't worth $10k on a good day, but its a $10k option on a $130k car. LAME
 
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drtimhill

Active Member
Apr 25, 2019
1,733
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Seattle
I have never once played a video game in a car, nor have I ever used the 'Easter eggs'. The extra screen in the rear will probably never be use in my car since I almost never carry rear seat passengers. I wonder how much could be saved by eliminating such features? Overall, I'll guess much less than the component cost would make it seem to be.
In effect the games are free .. we take for granted that the Tesla UI screens are super-smooth (try going to most other cars and watch the shaky UI response to scroll or zoom). That takes processing power (well, GPU power, but let's not get picky), and so you already have the hardware that can play the games .. porting of them is probably done by game makers (a game on the car is a great way to sell games elsewhere) or as a "hobby" by the Tesla dev team. Net cost, almost nothing.
 
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