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0 to 60 or double the range @30mph?

voip-ninja

Give me some sugar baby
Mar 15, 2012
4,254
5,376
Colorado
Kind of odd that the article makes no mention of the 4300+ foot elevation difference between Denver and Topeka, I imagine that had an impact on this hyper mile run.
That's an extra ~7kWh, assuming he could turn all of that potential energy from gravity into energy in the battery. It's something, but still less than the ~10kWh he had left.
 
My experience with my S is that A/C has minimal impact on efficiency. And definitely A/C is far better than windows open. Heat is a different story and has a noticeable impact on range.

Anyone have the metrics for the power draw of the heating elements for forced air and the heated seats? Cursory search didn't turn up much. The manual says the cooling of the pack and the cabin use the same compressor so I would expect A/C to be pretty minimal if the battery is usually be cooled by it. All you're doing is running another fan if it's already engaged.
 
Anyone have the metrics for the power draw of the heating elements for forced air and the heated seats? Cursory search didn't turn up much. The manual says the cooling of the pack and the cabin use the same compressor so I would expect A/C to be pretty minimal if the battery is usually be cooled by it. All you're doing is running another fan if it's already engaged.

Here's a reference for info on what the various elements of the cold weather package draw in a model S - it's way cheaper electrically to use seat and steering wheel heaters than to use the cabin heater:

Energy Consumption Of Various Tesla Heating Features

If you turn on an app like Remote S while sitting with climate on it will show what the power draw is. I've found that when the cabin heat is working to bring the cabin temp up it draws ~6 kW and the battery heater appears to draw another ~6 kW. That's the worst case scenario.

I don't have as much information on the power draw for the A/C since I am more often preheating rather than pre-cooling but I just tried it now on my car sitting outside and the car is drawing between 1-2 kW to run the A/C to cool the cabin from 88 F down to 70 F.

Tesla used to have a nifty range calculator on their website that I can't find anymore that let you change various variables like temperature, wheel size, etc. and it showed minimal impact of the A/C but significant impact of the heater. Here is the data from my own vehicle - at lower temps you are dealing with denser air and likely more slush on the road plus the energy to heat cabin. At higher temps you are dealing with the less dense air plus cost to run A/C. There's not a lot of data for the 90-100 F group but because of the lack of tint in my car I'm using the A/C on sunny days that are 80 F and above consistently so A/C use is well represented in that 80-90 temp range.

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