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10k mileage mark. What hauling-butt really costs - analyzed with pics

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by jaysquyres, Jul 3, 2013.

  1. jaysquyres

    jaysquyres Member

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    #1 jaysquyres, Jul 3, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2013
    Everybody likes to makes assumptions. I wanted to see what the real cost was of hitting 10,000 miles, and the true cost of driving fast in this awesome Model S. Here is the first pic:
    10k.jpg
    Looks like my true average is 386 Watt hours/mile. I used 3,859.3 kWh. I charge at my house, used 2,724 kWh:
    house.jpg
    I also charge at my office, used 592 kWh:
    office.jpg
    which means I used 544 kWh at free stations like the Service Centers, Kohl's, Hotel's, etc.

    If I had to pay for electricity, that would mean it cost me $364.76 to drive 10,000 miles (based on $0.11/kWh national average.) Hauling ass in a Tesla would cost $0.036/mile for most people, or $10.94 to travel 300 miles. With Solar, the cost is ZERO!!!
     
  2. keys

    keys Member

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    Awesome. Great info! That's quite a lot better than the $ 0.33 I pay per mile (the Netherlands though, we get ripped off everywhere)

    One question though, what's the difference between the net usage and what the Model S gauges tell you. I'm assuming they don't account for charging losses and such
     
  3. jaysquyres

    jaysquyres Member

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    #3 jaysquyres, Jul 6, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2013
    There may be a slight difference from when the car isn't moving (Cooling off car with AC or battery cooling.) The numbers should still be correct because the meters are within 1 ft. of the High Powered Wall Chargers, and nothing else is attached. Total electrical usage from meters divided by Tesla reported mileage = actual electrical usage per mile.
     
  4. Al Sherman

    Al Sherman It's about THIS car.

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    That sounds about right. I never "haul ass" and I'm getting around 3 cents per mile or slightly lower. I just tell people 3 cents per mile if they ask. Much less expensive than even the best ICE vehicle. Obviously depends on how you drive and what you pay for electric. I'm assuming some folks (like Jerry :wink:) might be significantly lower.
     
  5. SCW-Greg

    SCW-Greg Active Member

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    Yes, I'm on a flat rate of .09 cents (I believe), which equals 29.8 cents/mile in this scenario. And I've heard of others, who's overnight TOU rates are 3 cents/kWh... which would put this kind of scenario in the 10 cents / mile range. Epic!
     
  6. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    Based on my TOU rates and if I drive like OP (388 Wh/mi), driving my usual 20,000 miles in a year will cost only $500 compared to over $1,300 to fuel my Prius with gas for the same number of miles. Considering that I almost always drive at or below the speed limit, I'm expecting my actual costs to be even lower. Since I'm saving about $1,200/yr with my solar PV system, I can fuel my vehicle completely and still save over $700/yr with my solar array versus without solar and paying my utility company.
     
  7. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

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    Great info, but SOLAR IS NOT FREE. Sheesh. A typical solar installation solar costs around $.10 to $.12 per Kwh/hr in a sunny part of the country when you factor in the initial cost of the array amortized over the useful lifetime of the equipment. YMMV.
     
  8. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    I talked with somebody who had very low electricity rates like the ones the OP has, and he calculated he spent more on tires per mile (on the order of 2-3x) than on electricity.

    I, on the other hand, pay roughly $0.30 per Kwh so the calculations are closer to that of a hybrid car like a Prius. But so much nicer than one. :biggrin:
     
  9. ibcs

    ibcs Member

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    AmpedRealtor: Do not assume you will drive below the speed limit after receiving your Model S. I drove my Prius below the speed limit. My lifetime average is 356 Wh/mi with the Model S and I rarely drive the speed limit. It's a different animal all together. I have 11,500 miles at this point and it's just fun to drive.
     
  10. jaysquyres

    jaysquyres Member

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    #10 jaysquyres, Jul 7, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
    Cosmacelf, If done with patience, SOLAR is better than FREE!!! Many utilities will pay for the majority of your installation, plus you get the 30% tax credit from the Fed. Check here to see if you can get rebates/incentives. 10 years ago, SOLAR cost $10/watt. Now the cost is under $2/watt PLUS you get rebates and tax credits!

    In TX, ONCOR is one of the largest companies, and they pay a lot. They will pay for up to a 10k system, each year. We added onto our system (the maximum 10k each year) for 3 years in a row. They paid us $24,600 year1, $20,000 year2, and $19,320 last year. We are now NET-ZERO and love it! Here are some pics for you: OncorTALOT.jpg oncor.jpg

    39% of EV owners currently have Solar, and another 17% will be installing soon (according to Green Car Reports.) As prices keep dropping, it makes even more sense. pv.jpg

    It took us 3 years to become NET-ZERO because ONCOR only pays a maximum of 10Kw/year. Now even after charging the Tesla, we still have a nice negative bill with a 30Kw system. Red is what they charge us at night, Green is what they pay us for sending our excess energy to our neighbors:

    Reliant.jpg
     
  11. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    My solar lease sure feels "free" to me - it costs me $2,040 per year in lease payments to chop $3,200 off my annual electricity bill. That is a net savings of $1,200 annually after factoring in the solar lease payment, and with no up front cost for the equipment. I don't see any down side to this as long you are offsetting more in electricity charges than the amount of the lease payment. I save approximately 1.5x the solar lease payment in electricity charges due to my TOU PV plan. As a business person, if someone told you that spending X dollars per month in advertising would pay you back 1.5X in business, it would be a no-brainer right?
     
  12. Jeff Miller

    Jeff Miller Member

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    I'd estimate that over the five months you've owned the car, you've also used an additional 3.5 kwh per day as a vampire loss for a total of 120*3.5 = 525 kwh.

    In addition, there are charging losses that are not accounted for on the Tesla screen. These are probably around 7% or 8% of the total that the screen indicates, for a total of about .075 * 3859 = 290 kwh.

    Totaling vampire losses and charging losses, 525 + 290 = 815 kwh, I'd guess you actually must have used 544 + 815 = 1359 at the free stations.
     

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