Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

110 charging

Phlier

Bluebird
Jun 12, 2019
1,869
3,199
Utah
One of the really intelligent guys here on the forum (sorry I can't attribute it to an actual name), did an actual test of charging efficiency. And if I remember right, the results were that the higher the voltage and amperage that you charge at, the better the efficiency of charging.

As an example (and these numbers are no where even close to being right, just used for example purposes), let's say that you use 10kW/h of actual electricity using your 110/120 setup, but you only gain 8.5kW/h of pack charge. The difference is lost due to the fact that the charging system is not 100% efficient. Now if you charged using a HPWC, and used the same 10kW/h of actual electricity, you might find that you put 9.2kW/h of energy into your battery pack. Again, not actual numbers, just trying to setup an example.

So even if your 110/120 volt solution is working for you, if you're going to be keeping your car a long time, you might find that spending the money on a higher capacity charging solution could end up saving you money in the long run.

It's also nice to have the capability to charge faster if you end up having to do some extra short notice charging; it's great to be able to do this at your lower home electricity rate than having to pay $0.25 - $0.28kW/h at a supercharger.

I was doing pretty well with the 110/120 connector that the car came with, but have found the HPWC to be very convenient for planning longer trips.
 

Rottenapplr

Active Member
Apr 6, 2019
1,015
536
LOS ANGELES
I can live with 110 but I’m happy I got the nema 14-50. I can quickly recharge to full after a long road trip and I also can charge to 70% and get back home with 20% soc. Then charge overnight to get back to 70%. I would have 2-3 days to recharge with 110.
 
Sep 24, 2019
46
29
Great Falls, VA
I’ve been charging for the past 10 months on a standard 110V wall outlet and it’s been fine. Get about 50-60 miles overnight and more on the weekend ms which is fine for my daily needs. It’s been one of the surprises that this works out and I’ve not felt the urgent need for L2 charging at home.
 

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
873
US
Why?
There is evidently no need. Spending $500 for a faster charger does make the real cost of electricity go up significantly

First of all, you don't need to buy an additional charger as the unit provided with the car is sufficient. Also, as many have pointed out, the "charger" is in the car and the correct terminology is wall connector.

So maybe his costs will only be $200 for an outlet, or even $40 DIY project. Maybe $1500, in which case he might want to make do.

As to why he would want the faster charging when things are "settled" and "working fine", we don't really know the details of this person's life. If he drives 30-40 "average" then his is just getting by and some days either he will need more or need to leave the car idle. He also has more freedom to manage his battery according to best-practices that he can read about elsewhere, limiting max charge and depth of charge, and minimize battery range loss.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rottenapplr

Rottenapplr

Active Member
Apr 6, 2019
1,015
536
LOS ANGELES
First of all, you don't need to buy an additional charger as the unit provided with the car is sufficient. Also, as many have pointed out, the "charger" is in the car and the correct terminology is wall connector.

So maybe his costs will only be $200 for an outlet, or even $40 DIY project. Maybe $1500, in which case he might want to make do.

As to why he would want the faster charging when things are "settled" and "working fine", we don't really know the details of this person's life. If he drives 30-40 "average" then his is just getting bye and some days either he will need more or need to leave the car idle.
True, hey if it works for some one then great! And if others update to Level 2, then even better.
 

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
873
US
I’ve been charging for the past 10 months on a standard 110V wall outlet and it’s been fine. Get about 50-60 miles overnight and more on the weekend ms which is fine for my daily needs. It’s been one of the surprises that this works out and I’ve not felt the urgent need for L2 charging at home.

While it may not be urgent, you might overestimate the actual cost. Depends on your situation, but in some cases all you need is a $10 outlet, $35 Tesla adapter, a breaker and some wire. The electrician will try to rip you off as you have a Tesla. Others need to run 100' of cable through basements and underground, deal with landlords.
 

White Knight

Member
Sep 18, 2019
42
21
Honolulu, HI
Good info. i did rig a 14-30 NEMA outlet on my existing wiring. That was used for my Jacuzzi. Planning to make an extension cord for my 220v, but found out i don't really need it. I used to share my dryer outlet to charge, 2x faster. To much hassle to plug and unplug. In Hawaii, we don't travel long like at the mainland. We are planning to move to Las Vegas later. Thats why i don't want to invest to much to charge my Tesla. Wanna travel later, will retire next year (i hope), 40 years at Pearl Harbor is enough for me. Questions. Would i safe more money on electricity if i use 22v vrs 110/120v? It shouldn't hurt my battery if i use 110v charge (although) it would take twice as long if i used a 220v. Right?
 
Sep 24, 2019
46
29
Great Falls, VA
While it may not be urgent, you might overestimate the actual cost. Depends on your situation, but in some cases all you need is a $10 outlet, $35 Tesla adapter, a breaker and some wire. The electrician will try to rip you off as you have a Tesla. Others need to run 100' of cable through basements and underground, deal with landlords.
Yup, I have a basement/crawl space/into garage run and a full main breaker panel for the house, so would also need a new sub breaker panel. Quotes are about $3k. If I'm going to do that I'm also going to add additional 20A circuits for the garage and more exterior lighting at the same time. But, I have only felt the need once for L2 when getting back from a road trip late at about 10% SOC and then commuting the next morning, but it was fine the next day.
 

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
873
US
Yup, I have a basement/crawl space/into garage run and a full main breaker panel for the house, so would also need a new sub breaker panel. Quotes are about $3k. If I'm going to do that I'm also going to add additional 20A circuits for the garage and more exterior lighting at the same time. But, I have only felt the need once for L2 when getting back from a road trip late at about 10% SOC and then commuting the next morning, but it was fine the next day.

Its a fun DIY project if you are have the time and aren't scared of it. As long as you get local permits and have the work inspected, its perfectly safe. Lots of people on this site that will answer difficult electrical questions (not referring to myself).

So you need 2 new sub panels ($20-$35 each), 3 breakers ($30, one for each sub-panel and 1 for the car), $200-$300+ for wire (depends how many Amps you want), $35 Tesla adapter, $20 outlet, permits, tools (multimeter), misc.

So maybe $500-$700, save 2.3k.

Definitely easier to get an electrician, but DIY can be fun. If you get it permitted + inspected, its just as safe as the electrician.
 
Last edited:

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
873
US
Good info. i did rig a 14-30 NEMA outlet on my existing wiring. That was used for my Jacuzzi. Planning to make an extension cord for my 220v, but found out i don't really need it. I used to share my dryer outlet to charge, 2x faster. To much hassle to plug and unplug. In Hawaii, we don't travel long like at the mainland. We are planning to move to Las Vegas later. Thats why i don't want to invest to much to charge my Tesla. Wanna travel later, will retire next year (i hope), 40 years at Pearl Harbor is enough for me. Questions. Would i safe more money on electricity if i use 22v vrs 110/120v? It shouldn't hurt my battery if i use 110v charge (although) it would take twice as long if i used a 220v. Right?

You do save a little money on the electricity - it seems that the charger has some fixed overhead and someone will post a nice graph link (maybe), but depending on how you drive you can save more by being proactive with how you manage your battery - in the sense of minimizing battery degradation by charging only to 80% and decreasing the "depth of discharge".

Wait... you want to retire to Las Vegas...? I guess if you want to travel, better to leave Hawaii, but you don't think it would be a shock?

 
Last edited:

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
873
US
Gee, after watching that video. i no like move. We take things for granted.

What is the killer for most people is the friends, family, job, culture, expenses. If you've been there 40 years, chances are that you have those managed.

Found this comment on the video "Braddah I’m Hawaiian born n raised in Hawaii n have recently moved to the mainland cause the cost of living is soooo much cheaper. I regret moving every single day of my life n can’t wait to move back home. Thank u for sharing r island life style with the rest of the world. It’s been fun n interesting here in the upper 48 states but it’s gotten old real quick. Time for this Hawaiian to go home. MAHALO & ALOHA."
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top