Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • The final cut of the 9th episode of the Tesla Motors Club Podcast, featuring Chad Schwitters, the former president of Plug In America, is now available. You can watch it now on YouTube or listen to it on all major podcast networks.

12volt Battery Replacement - NAPA Auto Parts

I agree that I don't like peoples' use of the word "bricked" when they started using it to describe a Tesla with a dead battery. When I first heard people call it that 2.5 years ago I wondered if they actually knew what "bricked" meant. Granted, there might now be a more general and mainstream meaning for the word, but to me it has always meant a device that has become inoperable and cannot be recovered (or not recovered easily).

A bricked device could have become inoperable due to software change that causes it to stop responding via normal means. Fixing it could mean opening it up and finding contacts to connect to JTAG and flashing firmware to restore it. A bricked device could also have resulted from physical damage like breaking a component or shocking it. Physical damage to electronic devices is not always easy nor worth trying to fix, depending on many things.

But I wouldn't call (not have I heard anybody call) a TV remote control "bricked" because it's batteries don't work anymore. Same with a car's 12v socket not being "bricked" if all that is wrong is that the 15 Amp fuse blew because you connected a power inverter that drew too much energy. It's easy for anybody to replace remote control batteries or car accessory fuses. A "bricked" device requires higher level skills or understanding and more specialized equipment to fix, like a JTAG programmer or a reflow soldering station (and the knowledge to use them).

To me, replacing or jump starting the 12v battery in my Tesla is just as easy as any other car (and I've done it to many). But I understand that there are people out there who have never done that to any car and have no idea how to do it. I don't think there's anything wrong with that. I'm just saying that when people use the term "bricked" to describe their Tesla with a dead 12v battery, I wince inside. Doesn't stop me from trying to help or inform them of ways to fix the issue.
Perhaps it is just “temporarily“ bricked.
 
Perhaps it is just “temporarily“ bricked.
Or perhaps as useful as a "brick" at that moment in time. But like I said, it's not the usage I'm used to from the tech and electronics world. Just wanted to point out that it bugs me when people call it that, but they can call it whatever they like. Maybe people should start calling it "doorknobbed", or "knobbed" for short, when their Tesla's 12v battery dies. That would be for "dead as a doorknob" 😆.
 
On the flip side, I haven't seen people call a ICE car with a dead 12V battery "bricked", so it's just weird. Generally you don't call a device with a easily swappable battery "bricked" when the battery died.
I've read multiple reports with jumping the battery and all it does is boot the car screen up and then shuts down shortly after. too little to drive the vehicle to the nearest autoparts store or service center. on the other hand - jumping a 12V car battery in an ICE vehicle will reliably get you going unless you turn the engine back off.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TLLMRRJ

TLLMRRJ

Active Member
Dec 19, 2019
2,093
2,536
Houston
Thanks to this forum, I learned to just add 12V battery to the 2 year service interval. If you plan it as regular maintenance, no issue waiting for the battery to come if in it's out of stock, and only $85+tax. Just put the new one in my Model 3, and it's so crazy easy and inexpensive, not sure why anyone would wait for it to fail.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Willy’sEV

stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
12,003
7,770
I've read multiple reports with jumping the battery and all it does is boot the car screen up and then shuts down shortly after. too little to drive the vehicle to the nearest autoparts store or service center. on the other hand - jumping a 12V car battery in an ICE vehicle will reliably get you going unless you turn the engine back off.
The only cases where I read it's like that is when something else broke in the car (in which case it meets the definition of "bricked"). But this thread is talking solely about a dead 12V battery and nothing else wrong with the car.
 
  • Like
Reactions: android04
I've read multiple reports with jumping the battery and all it does is boot the car screen up and then shuts down shortly after. too little to drive the vehicle to the nearest autoparts store or service center. on the other hand - jumping a 12V car battery in an ICE vehicle will reliably get you going unless you turn the engine back off.
I’ve heard multiple reports of ICE cars with dead batteries that, despite the owner’s best efforts, cannot be jump started. Nothing is 100% effective all the time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: android04
Thanks to this forum, I learned to just add 12V battery to the 2 year service interval. If you plan it as regular maintenance, no issue waiting for the battery to come if in it's out of stock, and only $85+tax. Just put the new one in my Model 3, and it's so crazy easy and inexpensive, not sure why anyone would wait for it to fail.
I'm waiting for mine to fail precisely because it's so easy to jump start it or replace it with one available locally. Call me crazy if you want 😅
 
  • Like
Reactions: EnrgyNDpndnce

TLLMRRJ

Active Member
Dec 19, 2019
2,093
2,536
Houston
I'm waiting for mine to fail precisely because it's so easy to jump start it or replace it with one available locally. Call me crazy if you want 😅

Yeah, you're crazy. Not easy to jump start when you can't get in the trunk without having to put power through the wires in the bumper. And reports that even if you jump start it, it's not drivable as soon as you remove the jump starter. And nothing says I don't know how to take care of my car like walking through a parking lot with a set of jumper cables and puppy dog eyes.
 
Yeah, you're crazy. Not easy to jump start when you can't get in the trunk without having to put power through the wires in the bumper. And reports that even if you jump start it, it's not drivable as soon as you remove the jump starter. And nothing says I don't know how to take care of my car like walking through a parking lot with a set of jumper cables and puppy dog eyes.
I have an A23 battery behind the tow hook cover to pop open the frunk. I carry a lithium iron phosphate jump starter in my frunk that I can use to jump start my 12v battery with, and if all else fails I carry a small 10mm wrench along with the jump starter to replace the 12v battery. There are stores all around me that sell group size 51R batteries, including a few within walking distance from work.

By the way, when my 12v battery dies I plan on opening it up as safely as I can to learn more about it.

P.S. replacing a 12v battery is easy and I've done it many times before on other vehicles. I've even replaced alternators, thermostats, brake lines, starter motor solenoids, and a bunch of other stuff in parking lots. Replacing an alternator on a Nissan 350z was not clean or easy job to do in the parking lot because you have to lift the car to get under it where the alternator is installed, and you have to disconnect a radiator hose with coolant in it to be able to remove a long alternator bolt.

P.P.S. I've limped 2 vehicles to a parking lot with my lithium iron phosphate jump starter. Both had dead alternators and discharged 12v batteries.
 
Last edited:

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top