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2018.10.5 Arrived

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Just got a push notification and installed it. Includes unlocking "improvements" and rearranged touch screen icons.
 

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Just got the car yesterday and installed the update last night, so I will really only ever know this new version and beyond. Although I did experience the locking and unlocking as I walked around the car taking pictures yesterday, and already saw this morning that that no longer happens.

I read on Twitter that the update uses a new mapping system. Not familiar with the old mapping system as I was driving home and not looking at the maps last night. What's the difference, or is there no on-screen difference and only data changes between old and new?

-Randy
 
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I noticed the discussion quickly veered away from the supposed purpose of the update so I will attempt to get it back on topic.

I have found the smartphone key via our two iPhone 7’s to be buggy. Sometimes it opens the car immediately when I approach. Sometimes it requires opening the app. Sometimes the car works fine with the phone in the designated charging position. Sometimes it asks for the key card and will only go if I reopen the app and move the phone off its charging spot. The SC supposedly fixed this on a recent visit but it is still just as buggy.

Perhaps this new firmware will help — my car doesn’t have it yet. If not, I suspect Tesla is going to have a line outside their service center doors to resolve this issue as production accelerates. A physical key fob may be the only solution for the short term. Bluetooth is everywhere but this is not the first application that has had problems with Bluetooth reliability and consistency.
 
I have found the smartphone key via our two iPhone 7’s to be buggy. Sometimes it opens the car immediately when I approach. Sometimes it requires opening the app. Sometimes the car works fine with the phone in the designated charging position. Sometimes it asks for the key card and will only go if I reopen the app and move the phone off its charging spot. The SC supposedly fixed this on a recent visit but it is still just as buggy.

iOS is aggressive about swapping a background application out of RAM into the flash memory, for performance reasons. If you are using other apps that in total are using a lot of RAM. Safari, if it has a lot of web pages open, is such an application.

This swapping into flash memory is entirely seamless for the user, you can't really tell when it's happened, and when an app is swapped into flash memory it normally no longer responds in the background. I suspect that's why bringing the Tesla app back to the foreground lets it function again.

Apple will on a case-by-case basis give protection from this swapping algorithm to a 3rd party's app. The list for that is fairly exclusive and the process for getting on the list isn't publicly documented (and probably isn't entirely spelled out internally, either) so it could be some time before Tesla gets that, if they are even trying at this point.
 
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I noticed the discussion quickly veered away from the supposed purpose of the update so I will attempt to get it back on topic.

I have found the smartphone key via our two iPhone 7’s to be buggy. Sometimes it opens the car immediately when I approach. Sometimes it requires opening the app. Sometimes the car works fine with the phone in the designated charging position. Sometimes it asks for the key card and will only go if I reopen the app and move the phone off its charging spot. The SC supposedly fixed this on a recent visit but it is still just as buggy.

Perhaps this new firmware will help — my car doesn’t have it yet. If not, I suspect Tesla is going to have a line outside their service center doors to resolve this issue as production accelerates. A physical key fob may be the only solution for the short term. Bluetooth is everywhere but this is not the first application that has had problems with Bluetooth reliability and consistency.

i had some pretty major issues with the smartphone key (android) working before 2018.4.9 but it's been almost 100% reliable since then. sometimes i have to push the door handle to manually trigger the unlock but it unlocks immediately if i do. i think with the new update, pushing the door handle (or trunk) is the only way to get it to unlock - supposedly to be more secure but maybe to keep from unlocking/relocking repeatedly while walking near the car in the garage, etc...
 
iOS is aggressive about swapping a background application out of RAM into the flash memory, for performance reasons. If you are using other apps that in total are using a lot of RAM. Safari, if it has a lot of web pages open, is such an application.

This swapping into flash memory is entirely seamless for the user, you can't really tell when it's happened, and when an app is swapped into flash memory it normally does no longer responds in the background. I suspect that's why bringing the Tesla app back to the foreground lets it function again.

Apple will on a case-by-case basis give protection from this swapping algorithm to a 3rd party's app. The list for that is fairly exclusive and the process for getting on the list isn't publicly documented (and probably isn't entirely spelled out internally, either) so it could be some time before Tesla gets that, if they are even trying at this point.
Interesting analysis but rather discouraging if your suspicion is on target. For the time being I think I’ll just make it a habit to take out my phone and open the app when approaching the car. Not sure what to do about the car occasionally asking for the key card once I am in the car and ready to drive — maybe just not place the phone on the “shelf” designate for charging unless in desperate need of a recharge.
 
iOS is aggressive about swapping a background application out of RAM into the flash memory, for performance reasons. If you are using other apps that in total are using a lot of RAM. Safari, if it has a lot of web pages open, is such an application.

This swapping into flash memory is entirely seamless for the user, you can't really tell when it's happened, and when an app is swapped into flash memory it normally no longer responds in the background. I suspect that's why bringing the Tesla app back to the foreground lets it function again.

Apple will on a case-by-case basis give protection from this swapping algorithm to a 3rd party's app. The list for that is fairly exclusive and the process for getting on the list isn't publicly documented (and probably isn't entirely spelled out internally, either) so it could be some time before Tesla gets that, if they are even trying at this point.

BLE will open the app in the background when it acquires its paired endpoint. I.e. even if Tesla is terminated, the car connecting to the phone should start it. So termination is not the issue here.