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2018 Model 3 "stealth performance" ... that actually isn't

What bothers me most is that you didn't bother to suspect or check once your car's performance last 4 years. It has been becoming easier to measure 0-60 time with an inexpensive invest from Amazon. Even without any app or instrument, people coming from other luxury sports sedan can feel if it is off from its claimed performance. M3 stealth has 3.2s of 0-60 while M3LR has 4.2 so it must feel so much difference. If it didn't feel any difference or off the performance that means either you didn't care that performance or you have not experienced sports sedan at this fast regime. In the end you didn't need that fast car. anyway.
Don't get me wrong, I agree with you on their fallback and mistake. It's absolutely hilarious. However you should have suspected the car performance with that much diffenece of rhe spec based on the time that you have owned. Four years are much more than enough time to figure it out.
Again this means you didn't need the stealth performance anyway. So I suggest to feel fine by the "badging" of red underline if that gave you some pride.
No, as I didn't have reason to suspect it ... because as I previously stated, I am not a performance driver. I never "floor it" ... much less floor it while timing it. The car has sufficient power that I never have had a real-world driving need to do so. But whether or not I used the capability, in my opinion, is a somewhat irrelevant fact in respect to the concerns I was attempting to get across in this posting. I.e., i don't believe it is relevant whether I use it ... to an evaluation of whether Tesla's conduct in this situation is reasonable, acceptable, or possibly needs some work.

This also doesn't take away from the fact that a future owner of the vehicle might have ascribed greater value to the car ... value that might ultimately benefit me when it came time to sell.

The primary reason why I cared about the removal is the WAY in which it was done (with zero communication, after a long period of original ownership) ... and the apprehension that scenario induced that such a thing could happen again, to another like me ... or even to me about some other feature that I do actually use. If I can help folks, by learning from my own experience (& mistakes, if necessary), then I view that as a worthy/responsible thing for me to do.

The badging doesn't give me pride one way or another. I am not one to "feel important" because I am fortunate enough to own a higher-performance machine. I merely want it to be accurate in order to mitigate future confusion for anyone who encounters the vehicle. Hence the reason why I subsequently scheduled a service appt to come out and correct it (i.e., remove the performance badge).
 
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I think it was helpful that you posted your experience. What muddied your point a bit was the part about how your car has less value now that the freebie is gone.
Apologies if I confused the issue. I was trying to tackle the situation from multiple perspectives: some might care about the unceremonious removal for their own purposes/enjoyment ... and others might care about the removal as it could impact the market valuation calculation (surprisingly reducing it by some amount after several years of ownership).

I felt either concern (or both) were potentially valid, depending on the listener, so I gave voice to both in my posting.
 
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No, as I didn't have reason to suspect it ... because as I previously stated, I am not a performance driver. I never "floor it" ... much less floor it while timing it. The car has sufficient power that I never have had a real-world driving need to do so. But whether or not I used the capability, in my opinion, is a somewhat irrelevant fact in respect to the concerns I was attempting to get across in this posting. I.e., i don't believe it is relevant whether I use it ... to an evaluation of whether Tesla's conduct in this situation is reasonable, acceptable, or possibly needs some work.

This also doesn't take away from the fact that a future owner of the vehicle might have ascribed greater value to the car ... value that might ultimately benefit me when it came time to sell.

The primary reason why I cared about the removal is the WAY in which it was done (with zero communication, after a long period of original ownership) ... and the apprehension that scenario induced that such a thing could happen again, to another like me ... or even to me about some other feature that I do actually use. If I can help folks, by learning from my own experience (& mistakes, if necessary), then I view that as a worthy/responsible thing for me to do.

The badging doesn't give me pride one way or another. I am not one to "feel important" because I am fortunate enough to own a higher-performance machine. I merely want it to be accurate in order to mitigate future confusion for anyone who encounters the vehicle. Hence the reason why I subsequently scheduled a service appt to come out and correct it (i.e., remove the performance badge).
I don't understand "No, as I didn't have reason to suspect it" --> You said you never paid for stealth performance. It sounds very strange that you didn't suspect something that you never paid for. If it was me, I would immediately contact Tesla and figure it out for something that I never paid for. So did you keep silence under the assumption that you had the stealth performance for free? I don't get it.

I think Tesla was not that bad. They certainly did a terrible mistake to label incorrectly and posed you with it for a long time, but at the same time you didn't pay for and never suspect why it' been there. They eventually corrected it via on-air update. Nothing to lose from your side as you also said you are not a performance driver.
 
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afadeev

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Feb 28, 2019
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told me that it occurred in 2021 ... and that my vehicle "never was Performance" and that I should consult my MVPA.

Bingo!
MVPA is the truth, and has always been that throughout your vehicle ownership cycle. And you knew that!

And just to remind any who has made it this far in the thread: it was never my intention to try to call out Tesla's legal responsibilities here. What I was trying to draw attention to was solely what would be considered appropriate and respectful behavior on Tesla's part

Well, you will REALLY love this thread, then:

This is the specific impact that I was concerned about: that it may not be well understood by the Tesla private-sale-community that some not-necessarily-straightforward form of verification is required in order to do proper due diligence on what you are purchasing. Because what the car thinks about itself and its capabilities, is far from authoritative ...

This is not a new concern. Nor is it restricted to the "Tesla private-sale-community".

When buying a used vehicle of any brand from anyone (private party or a dealer), it's reasonable to allow for a possibility that the seller is a dirty rotten scoundrel.
That is part and parcel of buying used cars - the buyer has to assume the additional cost of validating the nature of the product that they are aquiring. Over the years, I've run a cross dozens of mis-badged cars, cars with some visual performance parts cross-installed from higher-end models, etc, etc.
The only reliable way of validating what you are buying is cross-checking the VIN and registration info with an OEM. Either online, or by looking at the original window sticker/bill of sale.

In a case of a Tesla, the only reliable documentation is the vehicle's MVPA.

This also doesn't take away from the fact that a future owner of the vehicle might have ascribed greater value to the car ... value that might ultimately benefit me when it came time to sell.

They would never do that.
Not unless you had attempted to deceive them by claiming you were selling them some features that were not in your MVPA.
And if you had done that, the responsibility for committing fraud would have been 100% on the seller, not the OEM.

Simple enough, right?
Enough griping?

a
 
The only reliable way of validating what you are buying is cross-checking the VIN and registration info with an OEM. Either online, or by looking at the original window sticker/bill of sale.
And just how is THAT reliable? Some unscrupulous person could have easily REMOVED some important performance part since the car was originally sold. I suspect that the most reliable way is to physically inspect the vehicle.

Not unless you had attempted to deceive them by claiming you were selling them some features that were not in your MVPA.
And if you had done that, the responsibility for committing fraud would have been 100% on the seller, not the OEM.

Simple enough, right?
Bizarre. Blame is NOT the issue. The issue is how easy Tesla's behavior makes it to defraud someone, intentionally or not. Everyone on here wants to tie this up in a neat bow and there is no way to do that. There are so many scenarios that would let the information get lost, the simplest being trading it in at a dealer and having it go through the normal wholesale process. Another example? The OP could die, and the executor have no idea that the car isn't what it says it is. Checking the MVPA isn't an option, either. It has personally identifiable details about me and my financing. I assure that I will not be willing to give to anyone else.
 
Bingo!
MVPA is the truth, and has always been that throughout your vehicle ownership cycle. And you knew that!



Well, you will REALLY love this thread, then:



This is not a new concern. Nor is it restricted to the "Tesla private-sale-community".

When buying a used vehicle of any brand from anyone (private party or a dealer), it's reasonable to allow for a possibility that the seller is a dirty rotten scoundrel.
That is part and parcel of buying used cars - the buyer has to assume the additional cost of validating the nature of the product that they are aquiring. Over the years, I've run a cross dozens of mis-badged cars, cars with some visual performance parts cross-installed from higher-end models, etc, etc.
The only reliable way of validating what you are buying is cross-checking the VIN and registration info with an OEM. Either online, or by looking at the original window sticker/bill of sale.

In a case of a Tesla, the only reliable documentation is the vehicle's MVPA.



They would never do that.
Not unless you had attempted to deceive them by claiming you were selling them some features that were not in your MVPA.
And if you had done that, the responsibility for committing fraud would have been 100% on the seller, not the OEM.

Simple enough, right?
Enough griping?

a
Actually, that is not correct as Knighshade has pointed out. If the car passes through Tesla's hands at any point, any software features could be removed by them before they sell it on at auction. Many times the car itself doesn't update until it is again sold. There is no source of truth available that is easy for a buyer to check.
 
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I don't understand "No, as I didn't have reason to suspect it" --> You said you never paid for stealth performance. It sounds very strange that you didn't suspect something that you never paid for. If it was me, I would immediately contact Tesla and figure it out for something that I never paid for. So did you keep silence under the assumption that you had the stealth performance for free? I don't get it.

I think Tesla was not that bad. They certainly did a terrible mistake to label incorrectly and posed you with it for a long time, but at the same time you didn't pay for and never suspect why it' been there. They eventually corrected it via on-air update. Nothing to lose from your side as you also said you are not a performance driver.
Completely true, I never paid for it. I didn't "suspect" it because, as I stated in #63 ... upon delivery, the delivery specialist verbally said something to me about the "stealth performance" that my vehicle was coming with. I didn't know, at that time, that I should have expected such a "feature" to appear explicitly in the MVPA. That ignorance is certainly my fault, not Tesla's. So my "silence" was due to the impression I was given by the delivery specialist that this is the way "stealth performance" works.

Yes, I know that, in hindisght, that makes me sound like an idiot. Oh well. This experience has certainly provided no shortage of opportunities for me to feel that way.
 
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Simple enough, right?
Enough griping?
I am not griping. After my initial sharing of my experience, all I have been trying to do is answer questions of the "OP" as they have come up ... in order to remain responsive to the people's thoughts on a topic that I bore the responsibility of starting.

I am not trying to convince anyone of anything. If people want me to stop talking about this topic, then I will happily do so once questions-to-me/clarification-requests-of-me stop.

I know that some may find it most convenient to simply write off my story/experience as that of some ignorant/entitled individual who wants something for free. I think about it quite differently. I was trying to explore general thoughts around the balance between consumer rights and manufacturer obligation and/or good-faith behaviors. And I was doing so in the context of a specific example in my experience. This exploration was never meant to be a legal or remedy pursuit of any kind, just a general "learning where I went wrong" in terms of my expectations/surprise.

At the end of the day, I believe there remains a shared common understanding gap that will hopefully someday be better closed about how to diligently make software-centric connected device purchases ... and how to buy them used in a safe and unsurprising way. This is the fundamental point I was hoping to raise amongst a group of, hopefully, similarly-interested individuals.

Rest assured, next time I will be more inclined to keep my "learnings" to myself.
 
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