Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • The final cut of the 9th episode of the Tesla Motors Club Podcast, featuring Balazs Biro, of the prominent Hungarian EV channel Villanyautósok, is now available. You can watch it now on YouTube or listen to it on all major podcast networks.

2021 Model Y long range real world range

I have been driving Model Y in Alberta, Canada for last 2 months. I mostly drive on highways ranging from 110 to 120kmph speed on cruise control. I have been getting the range around 400km per full battery charging equivalent. On colder days like today (-13 c) even less. Tesla says it’s because less aerodynamic shape of Y. However, how could it be off by 20% on warm sunny day? After all EPA says 525km range on a full charge and all I get is 400. Anybody else have any different range than I do?
 
I have been driving Model Y in Alberta, Canada for last 2 months. I mostly drive on highways ranging from 110 to 120kmph speed on cruise control. I have been getting the range around 400km per full battery charging equivalent. On colder days like today (-13 c) even less. Tesla says it’s because less aerodynamic shape of Y. However, how could it be off by 20% on warm sunny day? After all EPA says 525km range on a full charge and all I get is 400. Anybody else have any different range than I do?


This article explains the EPA rating which is part of it . But the Cold in general will impact your range by about 19%


The Secret Adjustment Factor Tesla Uses to Get Its Big EPA Range Numbers
This procedure uses the same EPA city cycle (20-mph average speed over 7.5 miles with 18 stops) and highway cycle (48-mph average speed, 10.3 miles) used for fuel-economy tests of all light-duty vehicles. Both cycles feature extremely gentle driving; the most aggressive acceleration would be equivalent to an 18-second 60-mph time. Between city and highway loops, the test calls for a steady speed of 55 or 65 mph to deplete the battery. The EPA knows these low-speed tests aren't representative of the real world, so every EV's window-sticker range is the product of an adjustment factor that yields a more realistic consumer-facing figure.

This is where it gets interesting. The default adjustment factor reduces the window-sticker range by 30 percent. So a car that achieves 300 miles of range during the city-cycle dynamometer test ends up with a 210-mile city rating. However, the EPA allows automakers the option to run three additional drive cycles and use those results to earn a more favorable adjustment factor. Currently, only Tesla and Audi employ this strategy for their EVs, and Tesla scores the most advantageous results, with adjustments that range from 29.5 percent on the Model 3 Standard Range Plus to 24.4 percent on the Model Y Performance. If Tesla had used the standard adjustment factor of 30 percent, the Model Y Performance's window-sticker range would drop to 292 miles. But because Tesla takes advantage of the EPA's alternate methodology, the company can instead claim a 315-mile range.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Arctic_White
Upvote 0

ElectricIAC

Devil’s Advocate
Dec 31, 2019
3,112
2,091
DFW
One other thing to remember that Tesla does hold more reserve at 0%
The EPA tests go until the battery dies (does not maintain the set speed). This articles says that the Model Y LR can go for up to another 25 Miles after it hits 0%

Tesla saves more range at 0% than other EVs, test finds
That just means the BMS was out of wack (or purposely juked) on the tester.

**DO NOT** rely on this being the case in practice. At least on the S/X you used to be able to keep an eye on the power limit to give you an idea of how close you were to the car shutting down due to pack voltage.
 
Upvote 0
That just means the BMS was out of wack (or purposely juked) on the tester.

**DO NOT** rely on this being the case in practice. At least on the S/X you used to be able to keep an eye on the power limit to give you an idea of how close you were to the car shutting down due to pack voltage.
LOL... I'd start freaking out if it drops below 15%.
 
Upvote 0

SageBrush

REJECT Fascism
May 7, 2015
13,247
17,999
New Mexico
After all EPA says 525km range on a full charge and all I get is 400.

EPA testing is not at 110 - 120 kph
EPA testing does not take your local wind into account
EPA testing does not use your roads

There is nothing wrong with your car or your battery. If you want longer range, increase the tyre pressure to sidewall maximum and drive slower.
 
Upvote 0

ElectricIAC

Devil’s Advocate
Dec 31, 2019
3,112
2,091
DFW
EPA testing is not at 110 - 120 kph
EPA testing does not take your local wind into account
EPA testing does not use your roads

There is nothing wrong with your car or your battery. If you want longer range, increase the tyre pressure to sidewall maximum and drive slower.
How convenient of Tesla to publish that on the ordering page. Oh wait.
 
Upvote 0

SilverGS

Active Member
Nov 3, 2016
1,814
1,095
Ontario
I have been driving Model Y in Alberta, Canada for last 2 months. I mostly drive on highways ranging from 110 to 120kmph speed on cruise control. I have been getting the range around 400km per full battery charging equivalent. On colder days like today (-13 c) even less. Tesla says it’s because less aerodynamic shape of Y. However, how could it be off by 20% on warm sunny day? After all EPA says 525km range on a full charge and all I get is 400. Anybody else have any different range than I do?
The stated EPA range of all Tesla's is calculated based on driving on the highway at 55 mph / 90 kph.

The numbers you're getting make perfect sense at the speeds you're driving.

Try and conduct a range test when you can spare the time (and patience) and see how many km you can drive going at 90 or 100 kph. I'm willing to bet it will be close to the stated EPA range.
 
Upvote 0

ecarfan

Well-Known Member
Moderator
how could it be off by 20% on warm sunny day? After all EPA says 525km range on a full charge and all I get is 400.
And the answer is…
I mostly drive on highways ranging from 110 to 120kmph speed on cruise control.
You are driving much faster than the EPA test cycle. @SageBrush nailed it.

Any car, ICE or EV, will not get EPA numbers when driven at those speeds.
 
Upvote 0
I drive a lot and own a MY LR w/20” wheels. I find weather to be the biggest factor over anything really. I’ve driven from edm to ft mac often and all around alberta and during the summer months (25deg and above) i get around 480 km going 100km/hr. The best efficiency I got was 152wh/k and ave was 160. But I also seen the worst of it during the December cold snap when it was -40 in Edmonton and seen over 500 wh/km. It’s rly affected by weather. I work in town now so I don’t have to crunch numbers like I used to when I travelled up north. Can’t wait for the 1000km batteries in a few years so we don’t rly have to worry as much.
 
Upvote 0

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top