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220 Extension Cord

Discussion in 'Roadster' started by Pantera Dude, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    I am thinking about buying a roadster and would like to know if I can use an extension cord 75-80 feet in length to get to my 220 outlet? Would there be too much voltage/amperage drop? I have 110 within about 20 feet but it seems that the 220 would be nice to have. I would be using the car as a daily driver, average driving of maybe 20 or 30 miles a day. Would 110 be sufficient for this application?

    Thanks
     
  2. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    It would be better and safer to have an electrician properly wire another plug to the location that you need it.
     
  3. NigelM

    NigelM Recovering Member

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    +1.

    Pantera, welcome to the forum! You,re asking for problems if you start using an extension cable on a regular basis. It cost me less than 200 bucks to get a NEMA 14-50 outlet (with a dedicated breaker in my fuse box) installed in my garage.
     
  4. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    I agree. You're spending a lot on the car so it's worth getting an electrician to properly install the 240 50A outlet you need.
     
  5. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    #5 Pantera Dude, Mar 18, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 3, 2012
    Thank you guys. I'll be parking the car in my driveway, but my detached garage would require getting the power about 100 feet from the breaker box. I agree the best solution would be to locate a proper outlet as near as possible to the car. In my case, that's probably going to cost a couple thousand bucks because I'll have to dig a trench in my long driveway to lay the line and refill/refinish with concrete.
     
  6. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

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    You can usually get under the driveway with a 1" couduit using a water jet and not compromising the concrete of your driveway.
     
  7. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    Do they have to dig through the concrete to run the line? I have a detached garage as well and they were able to dig a trench through the yard. Took them about 8 hours and cost $1,000 though.
    If you do go through all the trouble to dig a trench, make it future proof. Run cable for maybe 2 50A circuits or a 100A and a 50A circuit.
     
  8. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    Thank you. Is the charger built into the car, or is there a separate charger that gets plugged into an outlet and then plugged into the car as well?
     
  9. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    The charger is built into the car. You still need to buy a cable from Tesla that would connect to your NEMA 14-50R outlet (or the 110V outlet with the cable included with the Roadster) to charge.
     
  10. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    Yes, the charger is built into the car. But people mistakenly call other pieces a "charger" when they are not.
    For instance, this is an "EVSE" not a charger:
    chargingSolutions_high_main4_large.jpg

    And there are interface boxes, some call a "connector":
    universal_large.jpg

    charging Tesla Motors
     
  11. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    And the charger is in the car. The Tesla HPC or a NEMA 14-50 are just plugs to supply power. One can make an extension cord. Our local electrical supply place sells 6 gauge 3 and 4 conductor cord that could be used as an extension but it is a thick as my thumb. It is a big cord but will carry the load. At about $2/ft it is not inexpensive but it is less than going under the driveway.

    I know this is not recommended but as long as the wired is sized correctly it is perfectly safe. The power to your house is on suspended wires.
     
  12. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    Thank you guys for all your help!
     
  13. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    Good info, thank you!
     
  14. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    What does that EVES do? It looks like it gets mounted to your wall and hard wired into your home's electricity? And what is necessary to hook up to 110? Can I run an extension cord from any 110 outlet anywhere, say at a friends house if I'm away from home?
     
  15. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    The EVSE is simply a safety system. It makes sure it's completely safe before connecting the power.

    The car comes with a 110V GFI plug. Plugs in anywhere but slow as molases.
     
  16. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    Cool, thanks!
     
  17. hcsharp

    hcsharp Active Member

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    You would probably have to make your own extension cord to handle that many amps which would have to be high stranded copper SOW 600v cable. Installing a NEMA 14-50 outlet would require cheaper materials to supply the same amperage and be a lot more convenient in the long run. My advice would be to use the 120v outlet for a week or so until you can install a 220v outlet close to where you park.

    The other consideration is that 220v will give you much more efficient charging than 110v. Using 220v would ultimately pay for the cost of installing the outlet for it.
     
  18. Pantera Dude

    Pantera Dude Member

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    Thanks!
     
  19. Thumper

    Thumper Member

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    I asked a nice Asian lady engineer at the October event about making my own 220 extension cord using #6 wire. She explicitly said not to do it. I don't really see why not but I am reporting her advise. I bit the bullet and installed a 14-50 outlet in my car port for my S when I get it. I beat the deadline of 2011 and got the charging infrastructure tax credit.
     
  20. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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    Add.

    Charge car in Range mode every 3 weeks or month or so. Helps balance the individual cells.

    When you dig the underground run a smaller conduit (or two) for cat5, phone, video cam, whatever you may possibly want in your carport that could be a future garage or guest house whatever.
     

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