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230v electrical system question

Discussion in 'Europe' started by dtich, Jun 26, 2013.

  1. dtich

    dtich #P708

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    i am in the czech republic working and we've had some equipment issues at the facility that have led me to test the receptacles around our office spaces and i'm finding something that puzzles slash concerns me.

    the voltage between the two hots is ~233, fine and well. BUT, the voltage between the left hot (for lack of a more specific description since it's the left pin in the receptacles) and the neutral pin is ALSO 230 or so, as is the voltage between that leg and the screw on the receptacle plate. the potential between the other, right hand pin, leg and the neutral is effectively 0, as is the potential between that leg and the chassis screw.

    my question is, is this correct? i assumed not. i would have thought both legs would have the same potential to the neutral or ground, but it seems every receptacle in our whole wing is this way, so i am wondering. we had the facility electrician out and he promptly tripped the breaker twice when inserting his meter into the receptacle, which didn't give me much faith in his abilities. he says this voltage scenario is normal.

    any others have experience with this they can share, much appreciated.

    thx.



    mods - if this is too far off-topic, feel free to move, just wanted to put in somewhere it had a chance of getting a response, :) thx.
     
  2. araxara

    araxara S-P85#3,218 X-90D#3,299

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    From what you mentioned, I would conclude that what you called the "neutral pin" is actually the ground pin. The left "hot" is 233V and the right hot would then be neutral.
     
  3. markb1

    markb1 Active Member

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    What kind of outlet is this? Sort of sounds like a US split-phase outlet, but I didn't think that Europe used split-phase.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Possibly this is one phase of a three-phase system, in which case your outlet probably just has hot, neutral, and ground. (What araxara said.) I don't know much about non-US power standards, but what you describe may be correct for the Czech Republic.
     
  4. widodh

    widodh Model S R231 EU

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    Czech should also have a three-phase 400V system with 230V between Hot and Neutral and 400V between Hot and Hot.

    Do you have a picture of the outlet? Does it say something like L1, L2, L3, etc?
     
  5. sjokomelk

    sjokomelk Member

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    This is the correct behavior for the 400V three phase system that is in use all over Europe.

    I guess that you have a socket that looks like this ?
    800px-French-power-socket.jpg

    The left should be your live, the right is the neutral and the top is of course the ground.
    As widodh says, the voltage between live and neutral is ~230V and between neutral and ground 0V.
    What you describe is perfectly normal. :smile:

    In Europe we have 400V between live phases and 230V between live and neutral.
     
  6. dtich

    dtich #P708

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    Got it. That's it, thanks very much. Excellent.
     
  7. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    #7 TEG, Jun 26, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
    AC power plugs and sockets - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Mains electricity by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Schuko - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Electrical Plug/Outlet and Voltage Information for Czech Republic : Adaptelec.com, International Electrical Specialists

    Museum of Plugs and Sockets: French heavy duty plugs and sockets
     

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