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7 years later what is your 100% on your 85kWh battery?

Nov 8, 2018
471
281
LX
You can probably just compare % range loss, regardless of US/EU. You should see the similar % losses, regardless of the drive cycle used for range calculation.

I wouldn't look at non-85's, since smaller batteries may be more stressed/more loss, and larger (specifically the 90's) use a different chemistry.

I can't really compare range loss even on my 85S because i bought it used and don't know what typical range it had when new.
But the link AustinP posted already helped a lot and gave the general idea.
 

houstonian

ಠ_ಠ
Sep 2, 2013
197
176
Houston. Duh.
Took delivery of a new software limited S60D in Jan 2017.

100% range of my S60D - which I consider to be the same as an 86% charge on a S75D - was 218.

Since I took delivery I have unlocked the battery from 60 (i.e. 86%) to 75 (i.e. 100%) and my current 100% charge range is 237 as a S75D.

86% of 237 comes to 204, suggesting a 14 mile, or 6.4%, battery degradation based off the 100% range at delivery of the software limited S60D.
 

Plug Me In

Member
Nov 29, 2012
593
23
Central Virginia
6 years old in 1 week. “A” battery pack, 67k miles. Max charge last time was 240 miles. It was 273 when new. I’ve always suspected that the true range is a little more than that. Ran it down to 10 miles left a few days ago.
 

neroden

Model S Owner and Frustrated Tesla Fan
Apr 25, 2011
14,676
62,627
Ithaca, NY, USA
Just finished charging to 100% ahead of a long day of driving. I have a 2012 Signature P85 Model S. My 100% charge is 406 km or 253 miles. I have an original "A" battery pack with 98,855 km or 61,427 miles.
Feb 2013 Ordinary 85, and I have *exactly* the same numbers as you. 253 miles.
 

Olds442

Member
Nov 6, 2017
776
501
Usually in the past.
3/13 P85, 65k miles, [email protected] 90%, 254 at 100%.

after cycling the battery i was able to get this, which has leveled off to 254 at 100%.
it's a B pack.

teZ2Sgq.jpg
 

Olds442

Member
Nov 6, 2017
776
501
Usually in the past.
@skhenry81 - yes. tesla service recommended i cycle the battery by driving it down under 10% soc and charge to 100% soc, about once every month or two. since doing that it's leveled off to 253-254.

of note, i was charging to 60% daily and was told to charge to 80-90% by tesla. while people here will disagree with that recommendation to the death, i've only seen "positive" results. ;-)
 

tga

Supporting Member
Apr 8, 2014
3,882
2,686
New Hampshire
@skhenry81 - yes. tesla service recommended i cycle the battery by driving it down under 10% soc and charge to 100% soc, about once every month or two. since doing that it's leveled off to 253-254.

of note, i was charging to 60% daily and was told to charge to 80-90% by tesla. while people here will disagree with that recommendation to the death, i've only seen "positive" results. ;-)
The "down under 10%, back to 100%, down to 90%" does 2 things. It allows the battery management system to "see" the full capacity of the pack and better estimate range remaining. It also triggers a balancing cycle by charging into the CV phase (>93% SOC).

The first does nothing for your real range - it just allows the BMS to better estimate range remaining at a particular pack voltage. Big whoopie. Unless you're going for bragging rights ("I have 500,000 miles and only 2% degradation!"), or you frequently run right to the edge and need to count on the range indicator, that doesn't really matter.

The second (bringing the modules back into balance) can add real range. When charging and discharging, the car can't bring any module above/below its hard voltage limit. If the modules are out of balance, the highest limits how high you can charge, and the lowest limits how low you can go. If they diverge wildly, you'll have limited usable capacity. Charging over 93% brings the cells into "top balance" by bleeding off excess charge from the higher voltage modules to bring them all closer together.

There's nothing inherently "better" about 80-90% vs 60%. There will be a tiny (possibly immeasurable in real-word experience) increase in battery degradation at the higher SOC, but 90% still isn't enough to trigger balancing. It may reduce the amount of imbalance and improve the BMS range estimates, but who cares.

Even if Tesla officially recommends 90% every day, that doesn't mean it's "better." A lot of factors go into these kinds of product recommendations (BTDT) - you try to balance longevity, minimize warranty costs, and reduce support calls/headaches. Ultimately, you go with a recommendation that (you believe) will minimize these costs.

Tesla has gone mainstream. Many of today's buyers are not early tech adopters, car enthusiasts or EV enthusiasts. Some are looking at a Tesla as a "fashion statement" or to "keep up with the Jones's." These buyers don't want to hear long winded explanations about balancing, charge currents, blah, blah, blah. They're "transportation appliance" people who just want to go from point A to B easily/cheaply/cleanly and "plug and forget."

FWIW, I'll add I charge to 60-70% in the summer (I generally only use 25-30% a day) and 80-90% in the winter (more range for heating, plus degradation is reduced in cold weather). I routinely charge to 100% (or at least >95%) before a long road trip, especially if it means skipping a stop. Someday I'll get the tools to measure module voltage and see how balanced the pack is/isn't.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,127
7,133
Boise, ID
thanks @tga whenever i post what tesla said people tend to disagree with it. thanks for explaining what cycling the pack does.
It's just that there are two different recommendations depending on what what type of thing you're trying to accomplish, but it takes time to explain them, so you usually get one or the other in kind of a vague generality:

Keeping your usage around 50% is great for not degrading the battery, but the software estimations get out of whack.
Running some empty to full cycles keeps the estimation algorithm accurate, but is a little more degrading on the battery.

Either one could be the right recommendation at the time, depending on what you're trying to do.
 
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Dgeorges00

Member
Jun 26, 2017
51
75
Texas
Just got a newly refurbished pack after battery failure. Went from an A pack to a B pack. Did my first cycle charge 5% to 100% and got 254 at 100%. Outside temp was 45 so hopefully get some more range as temps warm up
 

aerodyne

Active Member
Nov 19, 2018
2,215
1,653
Los Angeles
I have been keeping the pack at 57% last three months and not driving much due to rain. Range went from 269.5 to 267 per teslafi.

27k miles..
 

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