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$70000 for a 400 miles Chevy bolt?

Discussion in 'Electric Vehicles' started by No2DinosaurFuel, Sep 13, 2016.

  1. No2DinosaurFuel

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    Since the bulk of the cost of any EV right now is the battery and since the Chevy bolt has an effective EPA range of 238 miles, does this mean Chevy can make a 400 miles range Chevy bolt for $70K?

    Though the market maybe small I think there is some people who would want the 400 miles range if possible even if it will cost them 2x the current price of the bolt.
     
  2. James Anders

    James Anders Member

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    And where would these batteries fit? Or are you talking a Bigger Bolt?
     
  3. No2DinosaurFuel

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    Sure bigger or what not. 2x capacity should give it 400 miles. Maybe when EV has 700 miles range people would probably not care about charging for long distance because you will probably never drive more than 700 miles in one day. Again assuming you can recover the 700 miles in the 8-10 hours you are sleeping overnight.
     
  4. Vad42

    Vad42 Member

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    You can definitely get a Bolt for $70000 that goes 476 miles. Just buy 2 and stash the 2nd one at the halfway point of your trip. Ala Ponny Express.
     
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  5. GSP

    GSP Member

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    It is not difficult to design an EV with 400 mile EPA range with today's technology. Elon Musk has said that Tesla could do it, but it does not make economic sense. I believe this is the case for almost any automaker today.

    Tesla is very careful to target ICE vehicle segments where it is possible to sell EVs competitively. I believe it is a large reason for their success this far. When they release the S100D, it will have close to 350 EPA miles, and be competively priced.

    So we are not that far away, but it will be even longer before a 400 mile car can be profitably sold for $70,000. Maybe a 400 mile battery will be a 2023 Model 3 option?

    GSP
     
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  6. mhan00

    mhan00 Member

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    700 miles? The vast majority of people don't drive more than 70 miles in a day, let alone 700.
     
  7. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    No2DinosaurFuel meant on long distance trips.

    With sufficient range, you don't need superchargers, as it's good enough to start every day with a full charge. It should be possible to get 700 mile range with 200 kWh. So, if you design the car for a full charge in 10 hours, you need a 20 kW charger (80A).
     
  8. 2virgule5

    2virgule5 Member

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    Faster charging would make way more economic sense than bringing batteries that can do 400 or even 700 miles. Even with the projected increase in energy density a lot of those KWh would be just there to carry the extra battery weight. Even if the car could self-drive humans I garantie you that the laws of biology will make a 700 miles trip without stop extremely unlikely ;)
     
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  9. mhan00

    mhan00 Member

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    It doesn't matter if it's for a road trip or not. Tesla has no need to spend money and resources to try to design a pie in the sky "solution" to a problem almost no one has.
     
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  10. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    I didn't say Tesla should make cars with 200 kWh any time in the near future. But we may get there in 10-20 years.

    Assuming lithium-air batteries can be commercialized with an energy density of 2 kWh/kg, a 200 kWh battery could weigh 100 kg or 220 lb.
     
  11. mhan00

    mhan00 Member

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    Then what are we talking about? Hoping for a future technology to solve "issues" twenty years from now is hydrogen talk. Batteries are already ready now because no one actually needs 700 miles of range. The only people advocating for 700 mile range are people who discount EVs by constantly pushing back the goal posts to crazy levels to try to make driving an EV seem like a bad proposition.
     
  12. deonb

    deonb Active Member

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    If you double the battery you will almost double the weight of the car and most likely would have to change the shape as well, which will increase the drag.

    So your wh/m will drop as a result, and you'll most likely not get 400 miles.
     
  13. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    I agree that current battery technology is perfectly workable. A Model 3 should be able to go over 320 miles with the largest battery, and with a 20 minute supercharger stop, that can be extended to something like 480 miles. Two stops - 640 miles.

    But I also think that the range will gradually increase over time, as batteries become cheaper and more energy dense. And I also think that you need cars with 500-1000 mile ranges to go from 99% BEV market share to 100% BEV market share.
     
  14. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    Tesla could easily make a 600 mile BEV for 70k USD.

    The battery cost is something like 170 USD/kWh, so even saying you need 200 kWh because of the weight, the battery would cost 34k USD, leaving 36k USD for the rest of the car. The battery might weigh 1000 kg or 2200 lb, instead of something like 400 kg r 880 lb for a Model 3, but this could probably be added to a car like the Model 3. Assuming the Model 3 will weigh 1800 kg, the weight would only be increased to approximately the same as a top end Model S. And sacrificing the middle rear seat, the frunk and half the trunk would probably be sufficient volume to fit the batteries.

    Will they? No.
     

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