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800W RMS Amplifier install on 2022 model Y with new 15.5V Li-ion battery/AMD system

I installed a Kicker CX 800.1 amplifier and an AudioControl LC2i Pro LOC pushing to 2 older model 10" Kicker Comp VR subs in a custom box I built for the sub-trunk. I know there are better amps and subs out there—I’m from Oklahoma, so trying to support ‘the local guys’. Also just looking for some additional bass—not trying to draw extra attention or win a competition or anything.

After reading some of the posts here on the forum regarding the NVX boost system, battery issues, etc., I thought I had all of the equipment I needed for the install to avoid issues.





However, I had originally connected the amp’s power supply from the penthouse, but much like the last thread above mentions, there were issues doing that, and Tesla's electronics did NOT like it (I'm assuming the issue was the MOFSETS in the penthouse not liking the power draw when first waking up the car, but that’s just a guess). I ended up purchasing a 14V accessory battery from XS Batteries to help keep the amp happy and reduce the instantaneous draw on the system upon initial wakeup of the car. I also moved the connection point from the penthouse to the jump post at the front of the vehicle, above the low voltage battery, to distance the connection from the MOFSETS. This combo seemed to work.

Here's the connection.
IMG_2276.jpeg


I installed circuit breakers instead of the usual audio fuses, in case I needed/wanted to disconnect the accessory system from the car’s low voltage system. Here’s the circuit breaker I installed at the front (30A).
IMG_2277.jpeg


Here is the battery location and the circuit breakers on both the line back to the front (again for safety/isolation purposes) as well as the breaker to the amp, as a typical install would require (80A to the amp, per its' spec, and 60A to the front, just to have a different color option to keep them easily identifiable).
IMG_2268.jpeg


Here’s a link to where I purchased the battery: XS Power RSV-S6
Yes, stupidly expensive. The ‘stupidity tax’ for wanting an aftermarket audio system in a finicky car I suppose.

I also added a Bluetooth lithium ion battery tracker from antigravity batteries. Without a battery isolator installed to keep the two low voltage systems separated, it just gives me the total voltage of the system (accessory and car battery together). So, not entirely useful, unless the car’s low voltage battery also started failing. However, I could open one of the circuit breakers between the two to get a better indication of the accessory battery voltage status.

Here’s the custom box I made to maximize the space of the sub-trunk.
IMG_2271.jpeg


IMG_2272.jpeg


The wings are weird, admittedly, but I needed every bit of space in the sub trunk that I could get, so that I had enough internal volume required for the subs’ operation. Box has just over 1.65 ft3 internal volume. Box is also filled 50% with polyfil as well.

It’s an 800W RMS amplifier, pushing power to the 2 10” 2-ohm DVC subs. Also have an AudioControl LC2i Pro LOC, receiving the audio and converting the signal for the Kicker amp. Here’s the whole system:
IMG_2266.jpeg


I used a piggyback harness another forum member made to tap into the audio system at the factory sub for the LOC signal; $70ish. Pricy, for what I was getting. But, easier than trying to splice into the system. And since all of it is plug-and-play, I can remove the system entirely as if it was never there. That piece of mind made the purchase worth it for me.

Trailer/tow harness, ordered from Tesla; less than $5. This was my 12V source near the driver’s seat footwell so I could install an on/off switch. I wanted to ensure the system would be fully off when I leave the car, to avoid battery issues with the amp continuing to stay awake or put a draw on the system. In a discussion with the CTO of WavTech, there seem to be reports after one of the 2022-based software updates where the previous low voltage wire that was being used to tap a power supply continued to supply power and the audio equipment continued to stay ‘on’ when the car was put into sentry mode, thus keeping the whole aftermarket system on. I use sentry mode everywhere but at the house, so I was concerned with this. However, I only have that story, and no personal experience with confirming that scenario. Just trying to avoid it, hence the on/off switch.

I put an inline fuse between this harness and the button, which I installed on the driver’s side console side-wall. This is one of the two spots where there would be physical/visible evidence of the system, should I ever remove it, since I did drill a hole through the plastic/carpet there.
IMG_2294.jpeg


IMG_2295.jpeg


For the negative/ground for the accessory battery and for the LOC, I used the bolt holes where the 3rd row seatbelts would attach.
IMG_2270.jpeg


Lastly, here’s the location for the LOC bass knob.
IMG_2275.jpeg


Only other thing to note was that when I purchased the battery, it arrived with a low voltage, so I needed to use a 16 V lithium ion battery charger to get it up to snuff. I installed it with just a hair over the car’s resting low voltage, to ensure that there were no issues from the temperamental software. Worked great, and once it was installed, it’s been charging/hovering at 15.4 V, which is 85-90ish percent max SOC for this battery, which should minimize battery degradation.

The system is definitely not breaking any records with watts, but is sounds amazeballs, and definitely does the job that I wanted it to do! Super happy with the finished product. Final verdict is that an aftermarket install on the new higher low-voltage system is possible (if you can manage to swallow the battery cost).
 
This is the post where I found the piggy back harness.
Aftermarket Subwoofer Harness
Hope that helps.
Love the build. 60 for a harness is a bit much. What year is your car? i have a 2022 MYLR running a Mosconi Pico 1 and a Ilusion Carbon XL 12. I have zero problems so far. My question to u is did u change your front battery to lithium and what is your constant 12v power?
 
Love the build. 60 for a harness is a bit much. What year is your car? i have a 2022 MYLR running a Mosconi Pico 1 and a Ilusion Carbon XL 12. I have zero problems so far. My question to u is did u change your front battery to lithium and what is your constant 12v power?
60 is absolutely too much! But I also wanted to have direct plug and play capabilities without splicing any factory wiring. I also didn't have access to the connectors. So that's why I paid it. Although I think if I had done enough digging on the Tesla parts website, I might have been able to come up with the wiring connections on my own, and actually making the harness from those connector parts would have been 100% feasible. So, hindsight is 20/20 for knowing that I could have done it cheaper.

I have a 2022, delivered in February of this year. My battery is already the new lithium style, hence all the trouble (and expense!) of installing a 14V battery that could run/charge at the 15.5ish V that the new low voltage system of the car runs at.

My constant 12V power is coming from the driver's footwell. There's a connecting point for a trailer/tow harness. That's the $5 harness I purchased from Tesla. Some people on the forum have used this same source to tap 12V power for radar detectors. Here's what the wiring harness looks like. I don't know if everyone has the wiring harness connection point or not--my car was ordered with tow package. The red wire is 12V, the black is ground. I have that line routed through my on/off button on side of console with a small in-line fuse there as well to protect my LOC, but if you didn't want a button/switch, you'd just pull power straight from that red wire.
Wiring - trailer harness driver footwell.jpeg
 
60 is absolutely too much! But I also wanted to have direct plug and play capabilities without splicing any factory wiring. I also didn't have access to the connectors. So that's why I paid it. Although I think if I had done enough digging on the Tesla parts website, I might have been able to come up with the wiring connections on my own, and actually making the harness from those connector parts would have been 100% feasible. So, hindsight is 20/20 for knowing that I could have done it cheaper.

I have a 2022, delivered in February of this year. My battery is already the new lithium style, hence all the trouble (and expense!) of installing a 14V battery that could run/charge at the 15.5ish V that the new low voltage system of the car runs at.

My constant 12V power is coming from the driver's footwell. There's a connecting point for a trailer/tow harness. That's the $5 harness I purchased from Tesla. Some people on the forum have used this same source to tap 12V power for radar detectors. Here's what the wiring harness looks like. I don't know if everyone has the wiring harness connection point or not--my car was ordered with tow package. The red wire is 12V, the black is ground. I have that line routed through my on/off button on side of console with a small in-line fuse there as well to protect my LOC, but if you didn't want a button/switch, you'd just pull power straight from that red wire.
View attachment 858169
Does the lithium battery give a consistant 15.5ish? Cause i wanna change my battery so i can figure out what i wanna do next on my stereo.
 
Does the lithium battery give a consistant 15.5ish? Cause i wanna change my battery so i can figure out what i wanna do next on my stereo.
I'm not sure I fully understand the question. The secondary battery that I installed is connected in parallel (+ to +, -/ground to -/ground). So they are sort of 'the same battery'. Meaning when the car uses the DC-DC to charge or restore the front/main battery, it's really restoring the secondary battery as well.
So 'yes' the secondary battery is giving a constant 15.5ish, but that's because it's really being treated just like the front battery and so carries the typical voltage of the car's low voltage system. Since Tesla is now using that proprietary plug thing on the top of their front battery, I'm not sure I'd know how to replace that battery with something else--does your car have one of the previous lead batteries that is swappable, or the newer Li-ion (with the weird plug)?
 
I'm not sure I fully understand the question. The secondary battery that I installed is connected in parallel (+ to +, -/ground to -/ground). So they are sort of 'the same battery'. Meaning when the car uses the DC-DC to charge or restore the front/main battery, it's really restoring the secondary battery as well.
So 'yes' the secondary battery is giving a constant 15.5ish, but that's because it's really being treated just like the front battery and so carries the typical voltage of the car's low voltage system. Since Tesla is now using that proprietary plug thing on the top of their front battery, I'm not sure I'd know how to replace that battery with something else--does your car have one of the previous lead batteries that is swappable, or the newer Li-ion (with the weird plug)?
Mine has that hankook lead battery. I was thinking to replace it with the smaller lithium one. My bad i thought u replaced your front battery also.
 
Mine has that hankook lead battery. I was thinking to replace it with the smaller lithium one. My bad i thought u replaced your front battery also.
Ah. Gotcha. No mine was one of the builds with the new tiny lithium battery up front that runs on the weird "12V" (really 15.5), hence the need for the stupidly expensive lithium 14V battery I used as the accessory battery, instead of a hella cheaper *actual* 12V based one that are a dime a dozen.
But, I don't have any useful experience to help direct you on your best option for upgrading that front battery.
 
I installed a Kicker CX 800.1 amplifier and an AudioControl LC2i Pro LOC pushing to 2 older model 10" Kicker Comp VR subs in a custom box I built for the sub-trunk. I know there are better amps and subs out there—I’m from Oklahoma, so trying to support ‘the local guys’. Also just looking for some additional bass—not trying to draw extra attention or win a competition or anything.

After reading some of the posts here on the forum regarding the NVX boost system, battery issues, etc., I thought I had all of the equipment I needed for the install to avoid issues.





However, I had originally connected the amp’s power supply from the penthouse, but much like the last thread above mentions, there were issues doing that, and Tesla's electronics did NOT like it (I'm assuming the issue was the MOFSETS in the penthouse not liking the power draw when first waking up the car, but that’s just a guess). I ended up purchasing a 14V accessory battery from XS Batteries to help keep the amp happy and reduce the instantaneous draw on the system upon initial wakeup of the car. I also moved the connection point from the penthouse to the jump post at the front of the vehicle, above the low voltage battery, to distance the connection from the MOFSETS. This combo seemed to work.

Here's the connection.
View attachment 854079

I installed circuit breakers instead of the usual audio fuses, in case I needed/wanted to disconnect the accessory system from the car’s low voltage system. Here’s the circuit breaker I installed at the front (30A).
View attachment 854080

Here is the battery location and the circuit breakers on both the line back to the front (again for safety/isolation purposes) as well as the breaker to the amp, as a typical install would require (80A to the amp, per its' spec, and 60A to the front, just to have a different color option to keep them easily identifiable).
View attachment 854083

Here’s a link to where I purchased the battery: XS Power RSV-S6
Yes, stupidly expensive. The ‘stupidity tax’ for wanting an aftermarket audio system in a finicky car I suppose.

I also added a Bluetooth lithium ion battery tracker from antigravity batteries. Without a battery isolator installed to keep the two low voltage systems separated, it just gives me the total voltage of the system (accessory and car battery together). So, not entirely useful, unless the car’s low voltage battery also started failing. However, I could open one of the circuit breakers between the two to get a better indication of the accessory battery voltage status.

Here’s the custom box I made to maximize the space of the sub-trunk.
View attachment 854085

View attachment 854086

The wings are weird, admittedly, but I needed every bit of space in the sub trunk that I could get, so that I had enough internal volume required for the subs’ operation. Box has just over 1.65 ft3 internal volume. Box is also filled 50% with polyfil as well.

It’s an 800W RMS amplifier, pushing power to the 2 10” 2-ohm DVC subs. Also have an AudioControl LC2i Pro LOC, receiving the audio and converting the signal for the Kicker amp. Here’s the whole system:
View attachment 854087

I used a piggyback harness another forum member made to tap into the audio system at the factory sub for the LOC signal; $70ish. Pricy, for what I was getting. But, easier than trying to splice into the system. And since all of it is plug-and-play, I can remove the system entirely as if it was never there. That piece of mind made the purchase worth it for me.

Trailer/tow harness, ordered from Tesla; less than $5. This was my 12V source near the driver’s seat footwell so I could install an on/off switch. I wanted to ensure the system would be fully off when I leave the car, to avoid battery issues with the amp continuing to stay awake or put a draw on the system. In a discussion with the CTO of WavTech, there seem to be reports after one of the 2022-based software updates where the previous low voltage wire that was being used to tap a power supply continued to supply power and the audio equipment continued to stay ‘on’ when the car was put into sentry mode, thus keeping the whole aftermarket system on. I use sentry mode everywhere but at the house, so I was concerned with this. However, I only have that story, and no personal experience with confirming that scenario. Just trying to avoid it, hence the on/off switch.

I put an inline fuse between this harness and the button, which I installed on the driver’s side console side-wall. This is one of the two spots where there would be physical/visible evidence of the system, should I ever remove it, since I did drill a hole through the plastic/carpet there.
View attachment 854088

View attachment 854090

For the negative/ground for the accessory battery and for the LOC, I used the bolt holes where the 3rd row seatbelts would attach.
View attachment 854092

Lastly, here’s the location for the LOC bass knob.
View attachment 854094

Only other thing to note was that when I purchased the battery, it arrived with a low voltage, so I needed to use a 16 V lithium ion battery charger to get it up to snuff. I installed it with just a hair over the car’s resting low voltage, to ensure that there were no issues from the temperamental software. Worked great, and once it was installed, it’s been charging/hovering at 15.4 V, which is 85-90ish percent max SOC for this battery, which should minimize battery degradation.

The system is definitely not breaking any records with watts, but is sounds amazeballs, and definitely does the job that I wanted it to do! Super happy with the finished product. Final verdict is that an aftermarket install on the new higher low-voltage system is possible (if you can manage to swallow the battery cost).
Any issues since the install, thinking about buying the battery and doing it to my 22 model 3 performance. Just want to make sure it's a guaranteed install. Battery hasn't been sucked dry at all while in standby?
 
Any issues since the install, thinking about buying the battery and doing it to my 22 model 3 performance. Just want to make sure it's a guaranteed install. Battery hasn't been sucked dry at all while in standby?
No issues since the install. It's definitely a pricy investment so I understand the hesitation with throwing that much money at a silly battery. My LOC is set for audio wake-up in addition to my on/off switch that I installed. With both of those, I think the installation is relatively sound from a 'battery drain' issue. From time to time I check the battery tracker that I installed, realizing that again it's not showing me the solitary voltage of the secondary battery but is instead of the native low-voltage battery and the secondary battery combined. Having said that, there's been no degradation/loss of voltage on any day. Here's a screenshot of what a day's worth of tracking looks like. I held my finger on the screen to show the voltage is reading 15.3-15.4 volts all the time. The battery tracker is actually pretty boring to look at since it is just day after day after day of that green line holding steady at that rate. But it sort of makes sense. The car is consistently using the DC-DC converter to keep the low voltage system 'happy' at the operating voltage that it needs. So, unless I install an isolator between the two systems, it should hopefully always look like this, assuming the car's system keeps doing its thing with the low voltage system.
IMG_2372.PNG

For what it's worth, I've also had a couple of software updates to the car since I finished the install. NO issues whatsoever. The *first* time I had installed the system, directly connecting to the penthouse, I thought I had everything worked out but then it did a software update and made the low-voltage system inoperable. I came out the next morning to a dead car. I had to 'jump' the native battery to get it to open the hood, reset the battery, open the doors, and wake back up. The current install of the secondary battery has caused no such issues.
 
No issues since the install. It's definitely a pricy investment so I understand the hesitation with throwing that much money at a silly battery. My LOC is set for audio wake-up in addition to my on/off switch that I installed. With both of those, I think the installation is relatively sound from a 'battery drain' issue. From time to time I check the battery tracker that I installed, realizing that again it's not showing me the solitary voltage of the secondary battery but is instead of the native low-voltage battery and the secondary battery combined. Having said that, there's been no degradation/loss of voltage on any day. Here's a screenshot of what a day's worth of tracking looks like. I held my finger on the screen to show the voltage is reading 15.3-15.4 volts all the time. The battery tracker is actually pretty boring to look at since it is just day after day after day of that green line holding steady at that rate. But it sort of makes sense. The car is consistently using the DC-DC converter to keep the low voltage system 'happy' at the operating voltage that it needs. So, unless I install an isolator between the two systems, it should hopefully always look like this, assuming the car's system keeps doing its thing with the low voltage system.
View attachment 861980
For what it's worth, I've also had a couple of software updates to the car since I finished the install. NO issues whatsoever. The *first* time I had installed the system, directly connecting to the penthouse, I thought I had everything worked out but then it did a software update and made the low-voltage system inoperable. I came out the next morning to a dead car. I had to 'jump' the native battery to get it to open the hood, reset the battery, open the doors, and wake back up. The current install of the secondary battery has caused no such issues.
Currently me and my buddy are doing a isolation and have a nxt hybrid capacitor be our guy with a step down converter. So we have two 12v solenoids turned on when we sit in the seat running off the accessory connection in the passenger kick panel. We just have to finish up our step down converter, we have to liquid cool it with a pump and radiator lol. It gets to hot for comfort. But soon we will have it finished. I'll update this post when we are finished. I just wondered if this could be a quicker solution until we can have the converter finished. Not worried about the money part haha just whether it's solid or not.
 
The wings are weird, admittedly, but I needed every bit of space in the sub trunk that I could get, so that I had enough internal volume required for the subs’ operation.
If a person is willing to remove (and redesign/replace) the sub-trunk panel, there is actually quite a bit of unused space around it. It's just not a convenient shape.
(You can see this by looking into the sides through the trailer hitch opening.)
 
If a person is willing to remove (and redesign/replace) the sub-trunk panel, there is actually quite a bit of unused space around it. It's just not a convenient shape.
(You can see this by looking into the sides through the trailer hitch opening.)
Agreed. It’s a large space when you pull the liner. There was another member here who posted about removing the line and installing a fiberglass chamber build for a ported sub.
I have basic wood working capabilities and access to tools. I don’t have access to materials or tools to redesign a trunk space liner, and wanted to be able to pull the system and use the trunk if I needed it for a long trip, etc.
So yes, but no, in my instance.
 
Currently me and my buddy are doing a isolation and have a nxt hybrid capacitor be our guy with a step down converter. So we have two 12v solenoids turned on when we sit in the seat running off the accessory connection in the passenger kick panel. We just have to finish up our step down converter, we have to liquid cool it with a pump and radiator lol. It gets to hot for comfort. But soon we will have it finished. I'll update this post when we are finished. I just wondered if this could be a quicker solution until we can have the converter finished. Not worried about the money part haha just whether it's solid or not.
That sounds intense! Definitely post about that build here when you get finished.
 

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