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A few things to know about buying a USED Model S...

it's only good if the original owner ran out the mileage on the factory warranty, as you pointed out.

The CPO warranty is the same as the warranty from new.
We're 6 months into ownership, and have paid zero in maintenance, and with no requirement to do so during the 4 years of CPO warranty.

Is the extended warranty you purchased the same conditions as the CPO?
 

tanner

Active Member
Nov 17, 2013
1,169
450
SoCal
The CPO warranty is the same as the warranty from new.
We're 6 months into ownership, and have paid zero in maintenance, and with no requirement to do so during the 4 years of CPO warranty.

Is the extended warranty you purchased the same conditions as the CPO?
Yes. It adds 4 years / 50,000 miles - extending the warranty to 100,000 total miles and until 2021.
 
some good stuff here, so thanks for sharing.

just a couple more corrections...

1) the solar tax credit has been extended for 5 years: Solar Wind Growth | CleanTechnica

Boom Times for US Clean Power, Thanks To Oil Lobby

2) as has been implied, that drive unit study was not at all scientifically conclusive. there's surely self-selection bias that basically makes the findings questionable at best, and as has been said, Tesla has been extremely proactive about replacing drive units -- even replacing ones not having any problems -- so that they could narrow down the problems before they became too widespread (noting differences between good drive units and ones making the annoying sounds), and to simply make customers happy (typically, a car company wouldn't do anything about such noises appearing). dive into the comments on the original story (which was on Green Car Reports) for plenty more details/discussion.

as far as not being able to see pictures or get details of the CPO cars right away, i agree that sucks.
 
1) the solar tax credit has been extended for 5 years: Solar Wind Growth | CleanTechnica

Wow! This is fantastic! I know two people in the industry who didn't think it would happen. Great!

- - - Updated - - -

Tesla has been extremely proactive about replacing drive units --

Yeah, actually, I feel Tesla has turned this crisis into the proverbial opportunity.

When I first googled the issue my heart sunk, since it was a huge blow to my plans to buy a tesla. 30 minutes later, I felt better about buying a tesla than before I knew of the drive unit issues, because of how the company dealt with the issue. What a test for the company: faced with a serious drive unit issue (which is understandable given the nature of this cutting-edge new technology, and given the climate-urgency-speed at which Elon is moving forward), the company didn't just replace drive units if they broke - they did it proactively. And for free. And extended the transferrable warranty to 8 years and unlimited mileage! Not only is it clear this company cares about their product and their customer, it is also willing to shoulder most if not all of the risk of new unproven technologies for the customer... FOR EIGHT YEARS!! For everyone! That's not just responsible, that's unthinkably generous.

So not only did they develop the technology, not only did they manage to bring it to market for me (us), but they shouldered the personal and financial risk for us too. If one of those were missing, I'd still be stuck with an ICE car! The car payment I make is a small contribution to what it has taken to get me the car. MOST of what it took to get me the car was in fact a huge gift from the hard working good people at tesla. Thanks Tesla.
 
I'm in the process of buying a CPO MS. Although I really wanted the AP experience, the aggressive CPO pricing convinced me I could live without it during my first EV experience. There is no SC near me and I've never seen an MS locally, so that too requires a little faith in the product. In browsing the Tesla CPO inventory, I had trouble with the lack of actual pictures and descriptions. I called headquarters to ask how one could get an accurate representation of each unit. Within an hour I got a call back from the used sales division. He helped me sort through the various offerings. I selected a 2013 P85+ with 5,800 miles from FL and put down the $1K. The car is in transit from FL to Dallas for final prep and will then be delivered to my house in OK. As I'm still in the process, I can't comment on the accuracy of the representation, but so it's been a good experience.
 
I selected a 2013 P85+ with 5,800 miles from FL and put down the $1K. The car is in transit from FL to Dallas for final prep and will then be delivered to my house in OK. As I'm still in the process, I can't comment on the accuracy of the representation, but so it's been a good experience.

Congratulations! Wow, those are some low miles, and in a place without snow/salt. Should be in great condition. We bought a CPO with a lot of miles on it and have driven it more than any other car we've ever owned. We just find reasons to drive it! Cheers.
 
Hey guys. I've been eyeing cpo p85s over the past several months. Recently the prices have come down with age or mileage being the big reason for a lower price.

Would you you guys suggest a cpo with 25,000 miles or one with 50,000 but at a $10,000 lower price point. All other things being comparable. I know that EVs and Teslas do not wear out as fast as ICE cars but I'm not sure if the extra 25,000 miles is worth the $10,000 savings or not. Just want to get some thoughts. Thanks.
 
Hey guys. I've been eyeing cpo p85s over the past several months. Recently the prices have come down with age or mileage being the big reason for a lower price.

Would you you guys suggest a cpo with 25,000 miles or one with 50,000 but at a $10,000 lower price point. All other things being comparable. I know that EVs and Teslas do not wear out as fast as ICE cars but I'm not sure if the extra 25,000 miles is worth the $10,000 savings or not. Just want to get some thoughts. Thanks.

It depends on how many miles you drive annually and where you mentally draw the line on high mileage. I bought my wife's FX35 with 38,000 miles on it knowing that we'd only put 4000 - 5000 miles a year on it so it would be years before it was a high mileage vehicle, at least what I consider a high mileage vehicle. With my S I approached it differently because I drive 10,000 - 12,000 miles a year and buying a 50,000 mile car would have netted me a 70,000+ mile car after just a couple years. So I opted to go for a 30,000 mile car, knowing that in a couple of years it would still be in the low 50kish miles. Now some might say the difference is entirely in my head and it is. For some reason I couldn't deal with the car having 70,000 miles in a couple years but I could deal with 50,000 miles.

The other concern that isn't just in your head is battery degradation. This is not covered by the CPO warranty and you will lose range with age/ battery cycles. For this reason, a lower mileage car is better but on top of that, a lower mileage car from a warmer environment is better because all things being equal, it will have fewer battery cycles for the same amount of miles.

With that in mind, I think California cars are the best (no rust, moderate temperatures are easy on the battery, etc) and mid-western/ northern cars the worst as they will have higher battery cycles for the same amount of miles as well as all the corrosion issues that come with cars in these parts of the country.
 
I bought my 2013 P85 from the original owner (long story) with 75,000 miles. Here in CT, winters are "unpredictable" but generally not good... so I purchased Dunlop 19" snows (LRR "W") which are wonderful (thus far). Make sure when you have the snow tires put on the car that you READ THE MANUAL section about "Jacking and Lifting" about "turning off the auto-leveling" feature by engaging "Jack" mode IF your car has the Smart Air Suspension. Your mechanic will need to be careful placing the car on a lift - might be worthwhile to do one tire at a time.
You might want to consider spending the $750 + tax + installation for the Tesla Home Charger (80Amps = 56mph/charging). No headaches/hassles... also, check the manual about "conditioning" so that the batteries are "warmed" on cold mornings.
 

abasile

TSLA shareholder
Supporting Member
I'd like to be able to scan third-party websites for used Model S cars that might be of interest to us. However, most sites cannot be counted upon to provide accurate, EV-specific information. For the Model S, I'm aware that some attributes like the battery size can be decoded from the VIN. However, I'm having difficulty figuring out which cars have the rear facing child seats. Does anyone know if there's a simple way to determine whether a given Model S vehicle has the rear jumpseats, short of directly contacting either the seller or Tesla Motors?
 

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