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A question about different charging rates

TechnoBabble

Member
Mar 11, 2019
63
9
GTA
How many different battery sizes are there for model 3, model s and model X? Lets say we are going back as far as 2014.

From what I understand there is a 75D, 90D and 100D. Is this correct?
What are the corresponding max charging rates for them?

75D = 32Amps max?
90D = 48Amps max?
100D = 48 Amps max?

And then there are the older model batteries that charge at 40Amps max with a Gen 1 adapter and nema 14-50?

Am I way off here? Please direct me to a web post that explains the battery types and charge rates if available.

TIA!
 

jerry33

(S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20
Supporting Member
Mar 8, 2012
20,002
24,694
Texas
It depends on when the car was made, and in some cases which size onboard charger was selected. I don't know that there is a graph anywhere showing this because for A/C charging it's just not all that important. While my S charges at up to 80 amps with a HPWC and 40 amps with a 14-50, in practice I set it at 33 amps because at home I don't need anything faster, and when traveling RV parks seldom have good enough electrics to charge at 40 amps, sometimes even at 33 amps the car will change to 30 amps (RV parks).
 

doghousePVD

My grandfather’s car
Dec 3, 2018
653
600
New England, USA
Different cars have different chargers as well as different batteries. So, it depends.

Some Xs charge at 48, 72, 80, and maybe 32. Actual charge depends on power source, Tesla wall charger goes up to 80 A in on a big breaker, but may on smaller breaker. A 14-50 was limited to 40, now limited to 32A.
 

Tessaract

Member
Aug 12, 2019
337
338
Ottawa
How many different battery sizes are there for model 3, model s and model X? Lets say we are going back as far as 2014.

From what I understand there is a 75D, 90D and 100D. Is this correct?
What are the corresponding max charging rates for them?

75D = 32Amps max?
90D = 48Amps max?
100D = 48 Amps max?

And then there are the older model batteries that charge at 40Amps max with a Gen 1 adapter and nema 14-50?

Am I way off here? Please direct me to a web post that explains the battery types and charge rates if available.

TIA!
Check out Tesla Model S - Wikipedia and Tesla Model 3 - Wikipedia for a fairly complete list of battery sizes produced.
 

ewoodrick

Well-Known Member
Apr 13, 2018
5,285
4,270
Buford, GA
There are batteries and there are onboard chargers. They are different. You may see correlation between bigger battery and faster charging, it isn't a given.

In order to reduce cost, Tesla will decrease the capacity of the battery, as well as decrease the capacity of the charger.

There is a closer correlation between battery size and fastest Supercharger rate.
 
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jerry33

(S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20
Supporting Member
Mar 8, 2012
20,002
24,694
Texas
There are batteries and there are onboard chargers. They are different. You may see correlation between bigger battery and faster charging, it isn't a given.

In order to reduce cost, Tesla will decrease the capacity of the battery, as well as decrease the capacity of the charger.

There is a closer correlation between battery size and fastest Supercharger rate.
Why would Tesla reduce the capacity of the battery when the demand is for more range? Did you mean increase? The more capacity a battery has the faster it can charge.
 

ewoodrick

Well-Known Member
Apr 13, 2018
5,285
4,270
Buford, GA
Why would Tesla reduce the capacity of the battery when the demand is for more range? Did you mean increase? The more capacity a battery has the faster it can charge.

The bigger the battery the more the cost.

Yes, the bigger the battery, the faster it can charge (well, there's many other things as well) But that has NOTHING to do with AC charging, that's completely dependent on the size of the charger in the car.
 
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jerry33

(S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20
Supporting Member
Mar 8, 2012
20,002
24,694
Texas
The bigger the battery the more the cost.

Yes, the bigger the battery, the faster it can charge (well, there's many other things as well) But that has NOTHING to do with AC charging, that's completely dependent on the size of the charger in the car.
True, but generally you're not looking for fast A/C charging because that typically happens at night when you're sleeping. It only has to be fast enough. Superchargers for trips is where you need the fast charging, and a larger battery helps that. As far as battery costs go, they are reducing all the time. What sells BEVs is range. The very first question almost everyone asks when viewing my car is "how far can it go on a charge?". Everything else is a distant second.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,785
8,392
Boise, ID
The fairly straightforward answer about the history of the onboard chargers is this:

"Ye olden dayes" (Model S up through mid 2016)
40A or 80A, depending on whether you opted for the additional second charger. Not tied to battery size.

"The Middle Ages" (Introduction of Model X and then retrofitted into the facelift Model S mid-2016)
48A or 72A These were single unit bodies, with different power internals
The method changed a few times through the years about how it was either straight optional or sometimes tied to battery size. 72A is not offered anymore.

"The Model 3"
This one has always been tied to battery size. Long range battery gets the 48A. Mid and small battery gets the 32A.
 
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Big Ike

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jan 12, 2019
126
134
Arizona
How many different battery sizes are there for model 3, model s and model X? Lets say we are going back as far as 2014.

From what I understand there is a 75D, 90D and 100D. Is this correct?
What are the corresponding max charging rates for them?

75D = 32Amps max?
90D = 48Amps max?
100D = 48 Amps max?

And then there are the older model batteries that charge at 40Amps max with a Gen 1 adapter and nema 14-50?

Am I way off here? Please direct me to a web post that explains the battery types and charge rates if available.

TIA!
Not to be a jerk, but I was under the impression that the "D" was a function of electric motors on the vehicle (D for Dual) and had nothing to do with the battery size or amperage that they may charge at.
 
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jerry33

(S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20
Supporting Member
Mar 8, 2012
20,002
24,694
Texas
Not to be a jerk, but I was under the impression that the "D" was a function of electric motors on the vehicle (D for Dual) and had nothing to do with the battery size or amperage that they may charge at.
Correct. It's the 75/90/100 that were matched with different onboard charger sizes.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,785
8,392
Boise, ID
Correct. It's the 75/90/100 that were matched with different onboard charger sizes.
I didn't realize that onboard chargers were optimized for the battery pack size. Informative, thanks!
Mostly, yes, but it wasn't always a strict correlation. In the 60/85 era, it was just an order option, not really tied to battery size. There were a lot of times where they would default with the bigger battery car (like a 100) getting the higher power charger, and the smaller battery car (like 75) getting the lower power one, but it was an option if you wanted to switch to the higher power one in your configuration. And in the Model 3 era, it really is tied to battery size, with no options to change that.
 
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