Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

A sad day. Got T-boned today.

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
15,404
33,455
Oregon
As values drop this will become worse as they will total easier. Someone would gladly take a vehicle like this and bring it back on the road, but it's not worth the risk since Tesla is actively collecting VIN's to disable DC charging. It's not sustainable.

What does that have anything to do with a car being broken down and sold for parts to keep other cars on the road?

And their value isn't dropping, people are paying big bucks for cars just to get the battery packs and drive units.
 
  • Love
Reactions: ElectricIAC

nayr14

Member
Mar 18, 2019
102
86
Chicago, IL
What does that have anything to do with a car being broken down and sold for parts to keep other cars on the road?

And their value isn't dropping, people are paying big bucks for cars just to get the battery packs and drive units.

You'd think this would be one of those repairs that could have used spare parts. We know the Model 3 totals easily.

I don't know the extent of the firewall damage, but I'm guessing it was totaled because the firewall isn't exactly an easily replaceable part, even though it could be repaired or left alone and be likely fine. Unfortunately it couldn't be brought back to "factory condition" so it's totaled.

Demand for junk yard drive units and batteries will likely go down with the number of Tesla's on the road. Unfortunately the batteries can never be used by a certified Tesla repair shop again. Tinkers are buying them, but with the proliferation of the Model 3, the market will eventually start to flood with junk yard packs, which could be permanently damaged discharging while awaiting auction or processing. The efficient, environmentally friendly and sustainable path is to fix the car. Unfortunately due to insurance companies, our throw-away society and Tesla, this isn't the case.
 

GregD60

Member
Mar 24, 2016
357
349
Colorado
You'd think this would be one of those repairs that could have used spare parts. We know the Model 3 totals easily.

I don't know the extent of the firewall damage, but I'm guessing it was totaled because the firewall isn't exactly an easily replaceable part, even though it could be repaired or left alone and be likely fine. Unfortunately it couldn't be brought back to "factory condition" so it's totaled.

Demand for junk yard drive units and batteries will likely go down with the number of Tesla's on the road. Unfortunately the batteries can never be used by a certified Tesla repair shop again. Tinkers are buying them, but with the proliferation of the Model 3, the market will eventually start to flood with junk yard packs, which could be permanently damaged discharging while awaiting auction or processing. The efficient, environmentally friendly and sustainable path is to fix the car. Unfortunately due to insurance companies, our throw-away society and Tesla, this isn't the case.
I would say it's due to our legal liability system more than any of the above. With enough damage to a car, it is extremely difficult to repair it to a point where you're positive that it's in excellent condition. If the car is ever in an accident in the future, whoever repaired the car, and any insurance company that went along with the repair, will be looked at very, very hard for liability. So, it is a society related thing, but it's due to the litigiousness of our society rather than the throw-away mentality.
 

dmurphy

Woof.
Dec 7, 2018
3,482
4,687
New Jersey - Morris County
Unfortunately due to insurance companies, our throw-away society and Tesla, this isn't the case.

Has nothing to do with a “throw away”‘ society and everything to do with safety. Today’s cars are built as an integrated system, designed to protect the passenger compartment at all costs. Parts aren’t as simple as bolt-on, bolt-off. They’re sacrificial to protect the occupants.

Here’s what happens when a modern, integrated car crashes with a bolt-together “pile of parts” car.


Everyone pines for “the old days when you could actually work on your car” until you realize just how deadly that is. I’ll take modern crumple zones and modern UHSS structural design any day of the week.

... and you’re flat out wrong about how “wasteful” this is. The vehicle will be decomposed, usable parts resold, and all other components (steel, aluminum etc) fully recycled.

In the “old days” a car would be crushed and tossed in a landfill. Now it’s all decomposed and recycled.
 

NickFie

Member
Sep 28, 2017
530
572
Near Philadelphia, PA
Sorry to hear the car was totaled. It literally gave its all to protect the humans inside.

Tesla design made a clear decision-absorb energy across a lot of the structure to minimize risk of penetration or stronger initial shock.

If they had tried to localize impact damage to the door structure they would have risked either penetration to passenger area through deformation, or less energy absorption/severe passenger acceleration by making the door and frame stronger.

As mentioned earlier, the air bags didn’t deploy because widespread deformation did a good job absorbing energy and decelerating Mr/Ms T-Bone’s vehicle more slowly. Which probably left them in better shape.

You would have less expensive repair but badly shaken passengers.
 

dmurphy

Woof.
Dec 7, 2018
3,482
4,687
New Jersey - Morris County
But my understanding is that when you self-refer you only get one side of the incentive, not both.

I don't know for certain - I've seen it posted both ways - but my Google-Fu says that's the current policy. So it's better off using someone else's referral code -- even a forum member or some such. No gain to be had by self-referring anymore. Looks like they closed that door.
 

Gvardaman

Member
Oct 30, 2020
95
18
So. California
But my understanding is that when you self-refer you only get one side of the incentive, not both.
Interesting, I just self-referred for my m3 using my Cybertruck code. I did wonder if that would give me a credit when I got the truck, though who knows what the situation will be by then (2022?)
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top