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About that "yoke" steering wheel

Silicon Desert

Active Member
Oct 1, 2018
3,482
3,330
Sparks Nevada / GF 1
Still waiting for someone to tell me what the benefit of this wheel is beyond "it looks dope".
Help an old man understand "looks dope". Is that a millennial expression? :) In my time, dope was something that the Hells Angels smoked out in California :eek: I'm serious. What does that mean?
 
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thebishop

Member
Dec 14, 2014
239
212
Sweden
Two problems I have literally never had in a car

Didn't they sell the Model 3 center screen partly by telling us we didn't need to constantly look at this information? Now they are going to literally re-invent the steering wheel to make it easier to look at?

We are differently built....
 

CPennypacker

Member
Feb 9, 2018
42
61
Redmond, WA
We are differently built....

I just feel like if they were serious about this, they would be like:

We extensively tested this to ensure safety and functionality. This is how it will work (describe how it works). These are the benefits and why we are sure you will love this new wheel. (list benefits).

And not just dead dropping a picture of the interior with a cessna flight control taped to the dashboard and not saying anything.
 

Silicon Desert

Active Member
Oct 1, 2018
3,482
3,330
Sparks Nevada / GF 1
more room for legs under (good for some of us) and better view of dash
Yup that is me and precisely two of the reasons for the design. Not to change the topic, yet to ask, when in the world is a good time to visit Sweden? Temperature wise? Been there 4 times and every time I was freezing my tail and maybe I had a nightmare, but on one trip I could swear the sun came up at 3 am :eek: But hey, a wonderful place to visit. I really enjoyed the sites and culture.
 
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Silicon Desert

Active Member
Oct 1, 2018
3,482
3,330
Sparks Nevada / GF 1
And not just dead dropping a picture of the interior with a cessna flight control taped to the dashboard and not saying anything.
yea, I am disappointed too. This is what I was really hoping they would implement :D
 

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thebishop

Member
Dec 14, 2014
239
212
Sweden
Yup that is me and precisely two of the reasons for the design. Not to change the topic, yet to ask, when in the world is a good time to visit Sweden? Temperature wise? Been there 4 times and every time I was freezing my tail and maybe I had a nightmare, but on one trip I could swear the sun came up at 3 am :eek: But hey, a wonderful place to visit. I really enjoyed the sites and culture.

I'd say the span May - September is good, with the best June-August (then you get summer) - aim for Mid-June if you want sunset closer to midnight than usual ;-)
 
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thebishop

Member
Dec 14, 2014
239
212
Sweden
I just feel like if they were serious about this, they would be like:

We extensively tested this to ensure safety and functionality. This is how it will work (describe how it works). These are the benefits and why we are sure you will love this new wheel. (list benefits).

And not just dead dropping a picture of the interior with a cessna flight control taped to the dashboard and not saying anything.

That would be nice. But they hardly do that for most of the new features they roll out.

Anyway, you can get the usual round one instead, it seems it will be an option.
 

Merle

Member
Apr 5, 2019
156
126
Tahoe
Still waiting for someone to tell me what the benefit of this wheel is beyond "it looks dope".

Precision.

In aviation, there are planes with yokes, and those with sticks. Cessna comes to mind for the former, and Cirrus for the latter in GA. In the air, you're probably doing two-minute-turns so it's not a big deal. But on the ground, you'll be taxi'ng around the runway environment and making typical turns.

In a mechanical linkage system, it's typically a fixed 1:1 rate of turn to something in the steering column. However, in a fly-by-wire or other electronically controlled system, you can have a gradual rate of increase (aka sensitivity) meaning you don't have to spin the entire wheel around to take a turn, but if you hold it, the angle/degree of the turn increases or it increases based upon how long you're at that threshold. Mouse acceleration comes to mind here for computer folks.

With steering wheel mounted controls (AP disconnect, push-to-talk, etc.) it's easy and consistent in a yoke based system to hit the same button / location.

Anyhow, driving shouldn't require more than a few fingers of control to do something for 95% of the time, and a large steering wheel could get in the way of doing just that.
 

Silicon Desert

Active Member
Oct 1, 2018
3,482
3,330
Sparks Nevada / GF 1
Precision.

In aviation, there are planes with yokes, and those with sticks. Cessna comes to mind for the former, and Cirrus for the latter in GA. In the air, you're probably doing two-minute-turns so it's not a big deal. But on the ground, you'll be taxi'ng around the runway environment and making typical turns.

In a mechanical linkage system, it's typically a fixed 1:1 rate of turn to something in the steering column. However, in a fly-by-wire or other electronically controlled system, you can have a gradual rate of increase (aka sensitivity) meaning you don't have to spin the entire wheel around to take a turn, but if you hold it, the angle/degree of the turn increases or it increases based upon how long you're at that threshold. Mouse acceleration comes to mind here for computer folks.

With steering wheel mounted controls (AP disconnect, push-to-talk, etc.) it's easy and consistent in a yoke based system to hit the same button / location.

Anyhow, driving shouldn't require more than a few fingers of control to do something for 95% of the time, and a large steering wheel could get in the way of doing just that.

Perfect. I could not have said it better. Now that you have reminded me, Tesla steering is essentially drive by wire in many aspects.
And contrary to some thinking, there has been a LOT of focus, testing, discussion, etc on whether or not to put a yoke in the car. It wasn't just a through it on the dash thing. It just seems unusual to people that are seeing something different for the first time.
 
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CPennypacker

Member
Feb 9, 2018
42
61
Redmond, WA
Precision.

In aviation, there are planes with yokes, and those with sticks. Cessna comes to mind for the former, and Cirrus for the latter in GA. In the air, you're probably doing two-minute-turns so it's not a big deal. But on the ground, you'll be taxi'ng around the runway environment and making typical turns.

In a mechanical linkage system, it's typically a fixed 1:1 rate of turn to something in the steering column. However, in a fly-by-wire or other electronically controlled system, you can have a gradual rate of increase (aka sensitivity) meaning you don't have to spin the entire wheel around to take a turn, but if you hold it, the angle/degree of the turn increases or it increases based upon how long you're at that threshold. Mouse acceleration comes to mind here for computer folks.

With steering wheel mounted controls (AP disconnect, push-to-talk, etc.) it's easy and consistent in a yoke based system to hit the same button / location.

Anyhow, driving shouldn't require more than a few fingers of control to do something for 95% of the time, and a large steering wheel could get in the way of doing just that.

How does this in any way increase precision over a round wheel?
 
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cityberty

Member
Aug 10, 2018
124
55
NY
Perfect. I could not have said it better. Now that you have reminded me, Tesla steering is essentially drive by wire in many aspects.
And contrary to some thinking, there has been a LOT of focus, testing, discussion, etc on whether or not to put a yoke in the car. It wasn't just a through it on the dash thing. It just seems unusual to people that are seeing something different for the first time.
Yeah drive by wire is nothing special and is in many new cars right? So not anything particularly special to tesla- so it is has been more than proven at a mass scale.
 

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