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Adding a charger to my 100 amp panel

Books

Member
Jun 18, 2020
22
4
GTA
My station is outside, as I wanted to list it on Plugshare; picture, above; Adding a charger to my 100 amp panel. The HPWC and NEMA 14-50 are both 240 volt, 40 amp rated. It does make it a lot easier for vehicles other than your own, to charge there.

As mentioned by @MD-2000 you can look at a NEMA14-50 plug, but you are limited to 32 amps using the UMC adapter. The Tesla HPWC will give you up to 48 amps (hardwired) or up to 40 amps, if you wire on a 14-50 male plug to the input ( not recommended unless you know what you are doing). The HPWC is made for your Tesla, with a charge port open button, but will not charge any other EV's. It's competitively priced with other EVSE

Should you have another EV in the family (or perhaps in the future ), you may wish to consider a J1772 EVSE. Lots of choices - Chargepoint, Flo, Juicebox are a few examples. Most of these are available in 30 and/or 40 amp models. Flo and Juicebox are Canadian made. You can use these with the J1772 adapter that comes with all Tesla models. Other EVs will also be able to use it.

As mentioned above, there may be some electrical restrictions, especially if the service is 100 amps. I do recommend hiring a licensed electrician for any installation - inside or outside

Thank you. At the moment we also have a ehybrid Cayenne in the family but we just use adapter that plugs into the Tesla charger. It charges much faster obviously than the one that comes with the Porsche.

As I mentioned, I have a 14-50 plug in my garage. Some people use this for a welder if that's what you do for fun; some use it also with a stove, if you cook things so spicy it's better to add fragrance to the neighbourhood than your indoors. And others, like me, just use it to charge your car.

The portable charger you'd get with the car comes with an assortment of plugs (sold separately) as discussed in this thread; a 14-50 plug allows for some serious current, although Model 3's are limited to 48A continuous. You can just use this, or you can invest in a Tesla wall charger - either hard wire it, or do what I did and make it a plug-in appliance. This allows me to use either charger, should the need present itself.

the wall chargers can be programmed to a max current draw, so you do not exceed the circuit breaker standard. The portable charger, I think, gets its "max" from the plug adapter used or you can set the max on your vehicle.

Location only matters for convenience. If you will have visitors who may need to charge, locate the charger where it can reach your vehicle or the visitor without doing the EV Shuffle to reach the other vehicle. Plus, some people in our neighbourhood park outdoors. The purpose of a garage in 50% of the cases is to store junk. However, the colder the climate, the more even an unheated garage is appreciated.

So obviously, the other consideration - is there a 240V plug0in in the garage? If so, what Amperage? If not, how far from the electrical panel to the charger location? How easy to run a big wire (i.e. attached garage or do you have to trench? Do you have to drill through a concrete foundation?) Then, is there room on the panel for a 50A circuit breaker? Will the building accommodate an extra 40A draw? (Unless you have electric heat on a 100A panel, the answer is probably yes - since you would generally schedule your charging for overnight. When the parents visit, simply don't do dryer and dishwasher while they are charging during the day, and avoid having multiple plug-in room heaters going)

perhaps someone more local can talk about hydro billing options, which I understand are no fun in Ontario...

Thank you.
 

DMC-Orangeville

85D and John Deere 5100E
Feb 14, 2015
941
1,164
Orangeville ON Canada
we also have a ehybrid Cayenne in the family but we just use adapter that plugs into the Tesla charger.


Okay, now you've piqued my interest...... You are saying that you charge your Porsche with a Tesla EVSE? Tesla "chargers" HPWC or UMC, come with a corded plug that is proprietary - will only fit in a Tesla. There are a few aftermarket adaptors that have been produced, but are not sold in volume. Did you source one of the aftermarket adapters?

This is the plug that goes into a Tesla - and is on both the UMC and HPWC
Screen-Shot-2018-10-08-at-11.22.23-am.png


This is an aftermarket Tesla EVSE to J1772 adapter....allows non-Teslas to use Tesla "chargers" - not common
jdapter-stub2-e1497992149471.jpg
 
Last edited:

George I

Member
Oct 24, 2017
53
43
Toronto
If you get a Tesla HPWC but later decide that you need to charge a visitor via a J1772 or you buy a non-Tesla EV (because somebody else made a compelling EV-don't hold your breath but hopefully it will happen) there are aftermarket Tesla to J1772 adapters eg. JDapter Stub
********NB!!! these are for AC charging only they will NOT work with DC charging eg. a supercharger or if you tried to daisy chain Tesla's CHADEMO adapter then the JDapter above then plug into into a nonTesla Ev via the J1772*****
 
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Books

Member
Jun 18, 2020
22
4
GTA
Okay, now you've piqued my interest...... You are saying that you charge your Porsche with a Tesla EVSE? Tesla "chargers" HPWC or UMC, come with a corded plug that is proprietary - will only fit in a Tesla. There are a few aftermarket adaptors that have been produced, but are not sold in volume. Did you source one of the aftermarket adapters?

This is the plug that goes into a Tesla - and is on both the UMC and HPWC
Screen-Shot-2018-10-08-at-11.22.23-am.png


This is an aftermarket Tesla EVSE to J1772 adapter....allows non-Teslas to use Tesla "chargers" - not common
jdapter-stub2-e1497992149471.jpg

Yes, this is what we use on the Cayenne. It works wonderfully well.

I found it on Amazon.ca. So far no issues.
 

MD-2000

Member
May 1, 2019
595
402
Winnipeg
Correct me if I'm wrong, but - as I understand it, Tesla wall chargers and J1772 just put out the 240V AC (or sometimes 120V for portable charger?) and the necessary charging circuitry is built into the vehicle itself.

Is there a standard similar or common to Tesla and J1772 that allows communication with the charger to set some parameters (like read "maximum amps" from charger)?
 

DMC-Orangeville

85D and John Deere 5100E
Feb 14, 2015
941
1,164
Orangeville ON Canada
Correct me if I'm wrong, but - as I understand it, Tesla wall chargers and J1772 just put out the 240V AC (or sometimes 120V for portable charger?) and the necessary charging circuitry is built into the vehicle itself.

Is there a standard similar or common to Tesla and J1772 that allows communication with the charger to set some parameters (like read "maximum amps" from charger)?
Correct
EVSE = Electric Vehicle Service Equipment....and are often Mistakenly called "chargers". The chargers (for AC systems) are in your Tesla, 40,48,or 80 amps (old dual chargers). Both J1772, and Tesla HPWC/UMC have communications capability, and allow you to serve up what they have. The EVSE supplies the amperage requested to the on-board chargers.

High voltage DC, like Chademo, and Superchargers bypass the on-board chargers.
 

TheRFMan

Member
Dec 15, 2019
554
422
Ottawa, Canada
The EVSE supplies the amperage requested to the on-board chargers.

My understanding of the J1772 standard is that the EVSE outputs a pulse-width modulated square wave that "advertizes" the maximum current it can supply, but does not actually control the current passing through it. The vehicle's on-board charger controls how much current it pulls, but will remain below the EVSEs "advertised" capability. There is no real-time two-way communication or handshaking taking place like the DC chargers do.

I've never seen the innards of a Tesla EVSE, but the components of a J1772 EVSE are rather simple. Generally speaking, it's a microcontroller that generates the PWM square wave that advertises maximum current on one of the communication pins, and monitors for a resistance on the other communications pin that indicates that the EVSE is connected to a car (and vice-versa). The main electrical component is a relay or contactor that directly connects the vehicle's onboard charger to the 120V or 240V AC line when a vehicle is detected to be present. The latch button on the J1772 connector is in-line with the circuit used by the car and EVSE to detect each other so as soon as the button is pressed, the EVSE no longer sees a car attached and immediately closes the relay/contactor.

Once the car is connected to the AC line(s), the EVSE doesn't really do anything except monitor its temperature and open the contactor if the temp gets too high. There would also be an overcurrent protection device in there; likely electronic, but could be mechanical.
 
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timboKazoo

New Member
Oct 21, 2020
2
2
Ottawa
I don't think you'll have any issues with this. This 9.1 KW calculation is correct. You are well under the ceiling.

Please hire an electrician to install your EVSE/plug, or at minimum, get a permit from ESA

You were correct. I had no problem. The inspector told the electrician that having the 60AMP breaker on the wall charger was fine on our 100AMP service.
 

TechnoBabble

Member
Mar 11, 2019
60
4
GTA
Does anyone know what the actual by law is that requires utilities to provide homeowners and business owners their hydro data in detail? I know someone posted the the bylaw number on this forum once but I cant find the thread.
 

Partsguy100

'21 M3, Navy Blue w/ Tesla Offer speaker harness
Does anyone know what the actual by law is that requires utilities to provide homeowners and business owners their hydro data in detail? I know someone posted the the bylaw number on this forum once but I cant find the thread.
The inspector never asked me when he came over to review my work. He said it was up to code and applied a sticker confirming that.
 

EVxdream

Member
Mar 29, 2021
119
128
toronto, ontario
alittle late to the party but ive been debating between 3 options. i hope someone could chime in on this new comers concern :)

Current service: 100amp.
Appliances: 2 electric stoves, AC, 1 electric dryer. 3 refrigerator. (the basement portion of the house has been converted to accommodate tenants).
Single garage.
i will be charging during the times of 12am-7am.
Will be using the UMC with its respective attachments.
will trickle charge when the battery is above 70% during the weekends or when theres no plans of its use by limiting amps on screen.
"a plugged in tesla is a happy tesla" - Musk

here are my 3 possible routes of having an outlet ready for our upcoming model 3.

1.) dryer buddy PLUS auto 30amp . my dryer is actually on the other side of the wall of my single garage. the outlets would be the NEMA 10-30. with this route, i will charge @ 24amp ($364 usd+shipping from bsa electronics)

2.) getting an electrician to add, as per his statements, a 40amp circuit on our panel/breaker. he will then route it to the garage (~10ft away). he will use a NEMA 14-50 outlet, 6 awg cables (if im not mistaken). will use grey pvc conduit. metal plates for the actual outlet. will route it from above and have minimum ground clearance as per code. licensed and insured. (850$ cad). will charge @ 32amp.
i should also add his thoughts as to why i dont need to upgrade my panel. please dont mind me doing so.
-> although possible, it is quite unlikely for all high drawing electric appliances to run simultaneously during the time of which ive picked to charge (the onus is on me on this one).
-> even if they were to, its not like all the stove tops will be used (im assuming he meant the draw will be less than what i make it to be)
-> i still have space on my panel for a 40amp breaker to be added in to.

3.) upgrading the panel to a 200amp service. super expensive. my last resort.

again, i appreciate any inputs as i am very new to this whole electric vehicle ownership. i have been doing alot of reading and watching. just thought id ask the community to see if my choices (aside from the 3rd) makes any sense :).

thanks in advance.
 
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Partsguy100

'21 M3, Navy Blue w/ Tesla Offer speaker harness
alittle late to the party but ive been debating between 3 options. i hope someone could chime in on this new comers concern :)

Current service: 100amp.
Appliances: 2 electric stoves, AC, 1 electric dryer. 3 refrigerator. (the basement portion of the house has been converted to accommodate tenants).
Single garage.
i will be charging during the times of 12am-7am.
Will be using the UMC with its respective attachments.
will trickle charge when the battery is above 70% during the weekends or when theres no plans of its use by limiting amps on screen.
"a plugged in tesla is a happy tesla" - Musk

here are my 3 possible routes of having an outlet ready for our upcoming model 3.

1.) dryer buddy PLUS auto 30amp . my dryer is actually on the other side of the wall of my single garage. the outlets would be the NEMA 10-30. with this route, i will charge @ 24amp ($364 usd+shipping from bsa electronics)

2.) getting an electrician to add, as per his statements, a 40amp circuit on our panel/breaker. he will then route it to the garage (~10ft away). he will use a NEMA 14-50 outlet, 6 awg cables (if im not mistaken). will use grey pvc conduit. metal plates for the actual outlet. will route it from above and have minimum ground clearance as per code. licensed and insured. (850$ cad). will charge @ 32amp.
i should also add his thoughts as to why i dont need to upgrade my panel. please dont mind me doing so.
-> although possible, it is quite unlikely for all high drawing electric appliances to run simultaneously during the time of which ive picked to charge (the onus is on me on this one).
-> even if they were to, its not like all the stove tops will be used (im assuming he meant the draw will be less than what i make it to be)
-> i still have space on my panel for a 40amp breaker to be added in to.

3.) upgrading the panel to a 200amp service. super expensive. my last resort.

again, i appreciate any inputs as i am very new to this whole electric vehicle ownership. i have been doing alot of reading and watching. just thought id ask the community to see if my choices (aside from the 3rd) makes any sense :).

thanks in advance.
Not sure of the dryer buddy, never used it.

I would go with option 2. I also have 100 amp service an try to limit the amperage to the car to about 20 amp. My thought is what's the hurry to charge at 32 amps when I have at least 7 hours of low amp usage in the house overnight. Low power is better for the battery during charging. I typically charge at ~20 amps overnight, regulated by the car software. I installed another panel beside my main panel to feed a Hubbel 14-50 switch. I also had it inspected by the Electrical Safety Authority and passed. The hubbel is top shelf and cost $140 but if you going to be plugging-unplugging the charger, it will see a lot of use. Do not use the $5 Home Depot outlet as it's not designed for that type of cycling. 6 guage wiring is thick but not sure of the price/ft. The breaker might be $50.

$850 seems rich. I had a Master electrician friend guiding me and I can happily recommend him if you want to PM me, I can pass his info onto you for a quote.
 

EVxdream

Member
Mar 29, 2021
119
128
toronto, ontario
Not sure of the dryer buddy, never used it.

I would go with option 2. I also have 100 amp service an try to limit the amperage to the car to about 20 amp. My thought is what's the hurry to charge at 32 amps when I have at least 7 hours of low amp usage in the house overnight. Low power is better for the battery during charging. I typically charge at ~20 amps overnight, regulated by the car software. I installed another panel beside my main panel to feed a Hubbel 14-50 switch. I also had it inspected by the Electrical Safety Authority and passed. The hubbel is top shelf and cost $140 but if you going to be plugging-unplugging the charger, it will see a lot of use. Do not use the $5 Home Depot outlet as it's not designed for that type of cycling. 6 guage wiring is thick but not sure of the price/ft. The breaker might be $50.

$850 seems rich. I had a Master electrician friend guiding me and I can happily recommend him if you want to PM me, I can pass his info onto you for a quote.

Hi there! thanks for your input mate.
i would definitely appreciate the recommendation. i shall pm you for it :).
as i have no experience when it comes to installs, anything south of a new upgrade service cost seems like a deal to me.
 
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TechnoBabble

Member
Mar 11, 2019
60
4
GTA
alittle late to the party but ive been debating between 3 options. i hope someone could chime in on this new comers concern :)

Current service: 100amp.
Appliances: 2 electric stoves, AC, 1 electric dryer. 3 refrigerator. (the basement portion of the house has been converted to accommodate tenants).
Single garage.
i will be charging during the times of 12am-7am.
Will be using the UMC with its respective attachments.
will trickle charge when the battery is above 70% during the weekends or when theres no plans of its use by limiting amps on screen.
"a plugged in tesla is a happy tesla" - Musk

here are my 3 possible routes of having an outlet ready for our upcoming model 3.

1.) dryer buddy PLUS auto 30amp . my dryer is actually on the other side of the wall of my single garage. the outlets would be the NEMA 10-30. with this route, i will charge @ 24amp ($364 usd+shipping from bsa electronics)

2.) getting an electrician to add, as per his statements, a 40amp circuit on our panel/breaker. he will then route it to the garage (~10ft away). he will use a NEMA 14-50 outlet, 6 awg cables (if im not mistaken). will use grey pvc conduit. metal plates for the actual outlet. will route it from above and have minimum ground clearance as per code. licensed and insured. (850$ cad). will charge @ 32amp.
i should also add his thoughts as to why i dont need to upgrade my panel. please dont mind me doing so.
-> although possible, it is quite unlikely for all high drawing electric appliances to run simultaneously during the time of which ive picked to charge (the onus is on me on this one).
-> even if they were to, its not like all the stove tops will be used (im assuming he meant the draw will be less than what i make it to be)
-> i still have space on my panel for a 40amp breaker to be added in to.

3.) upgrading the panel to a 200amp service. super expensive. my last resort.

again, i appreciate any inputs as i am very new to this whole electric vehicle ownership. i have been doing alot of reading and watching. just thought id ask the community to see if my choices (aside from the 3rd) makes any sense :).

thanks in advance.
This dryer buddy doesnt look like its CSA approved so forget that option altogether. I dont see any approval listings at all actually.

Your electrician adding a 32 amp charge rate to a 100 amp panel with 2 electric stoves, dryer and ac is bananas. A load calc would come in way over so historical data would be required. But even an ESA inspector would think it's a bad idea.
You need a load shedder for a 32 amp charge rate or a 200 amp service upgrade.
 
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EVxdream

Member
Mar 29, 2021
119
128
toronto, ontario
This dryer buddy doesnt look like its CSA approved so forget that option altogether. I dont see any approval listings at all actually.

Your electrician adding a 32 amp charge rate to a 100 amp panel with 2 electric stoves, dryer and ac is bananas. A load calc would come in way over so historical data would be required. But even an ESA inspector would think it's a bad idea.
You need a load shedder for a 32 amp charge rate or a 200 amp service upgrade.

truthfully, this is what my initial hunch was. i just think theres too many appliances. granted they arent utilized for the most part during my planned charging, the "what if" question still lingers in my head.
ill get our data from hydro and see where we peak last year.
ill keep the load shedder in mind.
thank you
 
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CorneliusRox

Member
Mar 3, 2021
153
168
MN
My advice would be to hook up a 40a breaker off your 100a service and power the car. If you're constantly blowing your main 100a breaker, go into the car's settings and lower the current it can pull. Then decide if that's good enough, or if it justifies a 200a service.

BTW, I have a 200a in my house and 200a in my garage and have never regretted it. If you can swing it, I highly recommend it. I was able to run 4ga wire off a 60a breaker for my NEMA 14-15. If I ever feel like upgrading to the wall mount, it'd take about 10min to install.
 
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