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Aftermarket Wheels Disadvantages

Discussion in 'Model S: Interior & Exterior' started by Billah, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. Billah

    Billah Member

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    #1 Billah, Dec 8, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2014
    I'm thinking about getting some gunmetal Avant Garde M590's to replace my stock 19's.
    The wheels are available in 19x9.5.
    I'm not very familiar with wheels at all so can someone explain the disadvantages to getting these?
    To my understanding, the stock tires will fit these wheels.

    - - - Updated - - -
    what do I need to know about the TPMS sensors?
     
  2. Kbsilver

    Kbsilver Member

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    Tread life has nothing to do with the wheels, as long as you have the correct offset and about the correct width (there is some flexibility with wheel width). Personally I like the narrowest wheel that I can use with a tire so that it will have a bit more curb protection. I know Tire Rack knows about the TPMS sensors and can make sure you get the correct ones. My understanding is least 2 maybe 3 different types of sensors used depending on the age of the car.
     
  3. franknesss

    franknesss Member

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    Here are some personal experiences from my recent aftermarket install. I decided to keep the stock P85+ staggered sizes so, 245/45 in front and 265/35 in the back.

    Here are some things i ran into and experienced:
    1. You will need to either buy or install existing TPMS sensors. The new sensors are $150 each.
    2. You can also experience a decrease in range. Weight and contact surface along with the softness of rubber all come into play.
    3. You have to reschedule with Tesla for realignment and reset of the TPMS.
    4. Finding a respectable installer. Make sure that they know how much lbs to torque the lug nuts too. I've had a friend's wheel come flying off their car due to insufficient torque.

    With regards to tread life, you won't really expect much difference with just rims, it really comes down to the tires you choose.
     
  4. http.com

    http.com Member

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    Let me make sure I understand this....if swapping the stock 19" wheels with aftermarket wheels, assuming the correct offset etc, the existing TPMS sensors can be "reused" with the new wheels correct? I just bought the aftermarket tsportline 19's, and plan to put them on as soon as I take delivery of my model S end of the month.

    I'd really hate to have to buy new TPMS sensors just because I'm swapping the stock 19's for aftermarket ones.
     
  5. Victory

    Victory Member

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    Correct, you can re-use existing TPMS by swapping the ones in your OEM wheels to the new ones.
     
  6. skilly

    skilly Member

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    The unsprung wheel weight is a consideration you will want to "weigh" in your decision to change the wheels; however, if you are buying something high end like a monoblock from ADV1 or HRE, it will be lighter than the factory spec cast wheels. And, Tesla doesn't need to reset TPMS pairing - that's a pretty basic function (such as correctly torquing wheels) that any tire shop can perform. Finally unless its part of your regularly scheduled service interval or you are adding links (lowering the car and changing its geometry) an alignment would be throwing money away.
     
  7. Brass Guy

    Brass Guy Member

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    I think there's some sort of re-mounting kit you need to swap the TPMS sensors between wheels. It's a "rebuild" kit. Probably gaskets or something. I'm not sure if it's necessary.
    You don't need a service center to reset TPMS in the Model S. If you use the same ones, you don't need to do anything, it doesn't matter where on the car each wheel is.
    If you buy new TPMS sensors for the new rims, there's a "Reset TPMS" button in the screen menu somewhere. You do not need any shop to do anything to the car if you get new sensors.
    I 2nd @skilly comment: same geometry, same alignment. Do an alignment if the car is pulling, you smash a curb, notice excessive tire wear, or you have suspension/steering components replaced.
     
  8. http.com

    http.com Member

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    That's a relief. Thanks for reply.
     
  9. AndreyATC

    AndreyATC Member

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    I went with 20s with stickier and wider rubber
    Zero penalty on range, just much better overall experience
     
  10. roblab

    roblab Active Member

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    Just for interest, your TPMS runs on a battery. They will last about 5 years. The battery is not replaceable.

    Also, you can buy OEM TPMS for Tesla for about $100 each. See:

    2013
     
  11. Billah

    Billah Member

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    Thanks guys. So if i don't want to experience a decrease in range, the wheel has to be lighter than the stock wheel? Are there any other factors when it comes to range? Also just so i know, how much do the stock 19's weigh?
     
  12. Racerx22b

    Racerx22b Member

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    #12 Racerx22b, Dec 8, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2014
    franknesss' response is full of errors. Some have already been corrected.

    Aftermarket wheels give your car a nice custom look and are cheaper than OEM (when comparing against the $4500 21" upgrade). If you are going with same size and using original tires you can swap TPMS with no issue and don't need realignment. I recommend discount tire for the work. They will torque your wheels appropriately.

    I suggest chatting with someone at getyourwheels.com. They have great prices on these wheels and are super helpful. They'll set you straight.

    Check this thread...

    I don't believe this to be true but while at the Dania Beach, FL store I mentioned custom wheels to the service manager and he said they will prohibit him from honoring warranty issues related to brakes, driveline, tire wear... I personally think that is BS but figured worth mentioning.

    My wife was happy with OEM and the service manager mentioning the warranty issue scared her away from the Avant Garde wheels. I was ready to order them. They look so good!
     
  13. Brass Guy

    Brass Guy Member

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    Isn't any range hit (from wheel weight) just from acceleration? If so, highway range shouldn't change noticeably.
     
  14. lloyds

    lloyds Member

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    The width of the wheels, weight, and width of the tires all impact range. This is why the factory 19s compared to the 21s have an noticeable energy consumption range variable.
     
  15. NorCalSJ

    NorCalSJ Member

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    is there any warranty issues with after market rims??
     
  16. Zextraterrestrial

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    I have lighter 19"s with 285 super sports and the range is worse or pretty close to the 21" stock. 245 all seasons on light 19"s do much better
     
  17. fluxemag

    fluxemag Member

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    I went with a 20" wheel because they looked better than 19", but didn't have the limited tire selection and cost of 21". The tire installer I went to swapped the TPMS from the OEM wheel without even removing the tires. They had a tool that pulls the TPMS out. Tire Rack is a great resource for selecting new tires in my experience. I had chosen some tires that weren't the proper XL load rating (basically truck tires), and they called me to correct the problem. This left me with only a few options for a 20" wheel, and I chose Conti Extreme Contact DWS. 20k miles later I think I have one more rotation left in them before replacement, because of the camber unevenly wearing the inside edges, and regen tearing up the rears (along with the go pedal). Still, getting 25k miles out of a set of tires is a huge improvement from prior experiences on performance cars, including an entire summer in AZ driving aggressively.
     
  18. matbl

    matbl Member

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    Hmm... 19x9.5 in front as well as back? Do they even fit?
     
  19. Kofi

    Kofi Member

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    They would probably fit. 20x8.5 all around running 245/40/20s is another option.
     
  20. Zextraterrestrial

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    offset is what matters there. My 9.5"s wont fit on my fronts
     

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