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Airport charger poll- rude or not rude?

What would you do at an airport Blink Charger?

  • Unplug the car- it’s my spot!

    Votes: 2 6.7%
  • Leave it plugged in... it was there first.

    Votes: 28 93.3%

  • Total voters
    30
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Our local club had a post made and I’m wondering what people’s thoughts are.

Our airport garages and long term lots have a few Blink chargers for EVs. The cords are long and can reach multiple spaces. You cannot make a reservation and it’s even odds whether one will be available or not.

A fellow, let’s call him Joe, arrives and finds a space available. The charger closest to his space is plugged into another Tesla. The charger closest to that Tesla is unused. He unplugs the other Tesla and plugs in his own car. He states that he tried plugging the other car into the other charger but was unable to and he left it unplugged.

I’m curious what the budding EV community thinks about unplugging someone else’s car at a public charger.
 
I think unplugging someone else's car is unconscionable in almost any circumstance unless there is an immediate danger. If I got an alert on my phone about charging stopping and went to investigate and saw someone had taken the plug out, I'd be furious and almost certainly just swap it back and then wait for them to return.

In the example you describe above - it might be OK to swap the plugs around assuming that both work and you don't cause the other car (Tesla or otherwise) any issues. But I certainly don't know the consequence of unplugging a Nissan Leaf and then reconnecting it to another cable - it might not automatically charge, it might throw an error or something else.
 
General rule is you don't touch someone else's car/charger without permission. You can't know their situation, schedule, or needs.

At the same time, when using a public charger, it's very good courtesy to leave a phone number or other means of contact on a note in the window/dash or a tag on the charge cord so that someone else who needs to use the charger can contact you.

In this situation, if there was a free charger with a long enough cord to reach your own vehicle, use that one.

A longer-term fix is that airports need to provide much slower but more numerous outlets for charging. Since the cars will likely be there for days at an airport, a 120V 20A outlet would be fine, cheap to install, and can be more numerous so that charger contention is eliminated.
 
I don't think I'd have an issue with that if the charge on the other car is completed. But, barring true emergency, I'd never just unplug someone's car mid-charge. On the other hand, you certainly shouldn't go to a public charger and just hook up and then go away for the weekend.
 
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Does a Leaf get remotely notified when it is plugged in? More than once I've been at a public charger and a Leaf has pulled in while I'm away with a note, "please plug me in when you leave", which I do as I'm unplugging. I can't imagine any EV doesn't just start charging if plugged in and not explicitly set otherwise (scheduled charging, etc.)
 
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Does a Leaf get remotely notified when it is plugged in? More than once I've been at a public charger and a Leaf has pulled in while I'm away with a note, "please plug me in when you leave", which I do as I'm unplugging. I can't imagine any EV doesn't just start charging if plugged in and not explicitly set otherwise (scheduled charging, etc.)
If I remember right it can text or email you both on start charge, completed charge, or charge terminated (for whatever) reason. I don't think it notify you that your car has been simply been plugged in unless it is in fact charging. You can also check the app to see if your car is plugged in, monitor your charge status, or start/stop charging just like a Tesla.

The case you're talking about the owner likely just pushed the charge button and the car is standing by to charge already when you plug it in, so it will start immediately once the plug is inserted. The Leaf will also start charging immediately with no intervention if it's plugged into a CHAdeMO charger. In that case, the charger is running the show not the car.
 
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I was at the airport parking Saturday morning. Oh no - two L2 chargers, and both plugged into vehicles! But, I took at look at the cars. And one of them had a note in the windshield "If green light is blinking, feel free to remove the charge cable." The green light was blinking so I got to charge.

Is there any equivalent on a Tesla? I'd love to be able to leave a note on my 3 "If XXX is happening, feel free to unplug the charge cable from my car. The Tesla adapter will remain attached to the car." The charging light goes out after 20 minutes, right? Can someone tug on a door handle to get the display to wake up and say "charging: 4:12 left"?
 
Here's my "Rules of Engagement"...

Rule #1: I never touch anyone's vehicle (#OPP), unless there's imminent danger resulting in the loss of life.
Rule #2: Never touch anyone's connected charging cable... as tempting as it might be, even if it's a vehicle you have 100% confirmation it's fully charged.
Exception to Rule #2: Vehicle has a note stating when it's permissible to remove charging cable and under what conditions they have declared.
Rule #3: I leave a note stating when it's permissible (Date/Time) to remove charging cable from my vehicle if the surroundings permit (i.e. Charging Station is covered with little risk to water ingress into my J1772 adapter).
 
The title says airport.... so i’m thinking long term at an airport. I have no issues with someone unplugging me at an airport or cruise terminal. Matter of fact, I’ve written Tesla and asked them for a feature to allow me to set my battery level that will allow the charge port to unlock (using a Tesla destination charger). If using J1772 adapter, naturally you don’t want to let the port unlock. At Key West parking garage I did unplug a MX. The EVSE had stopped working, and we power cycled it, used for the duration of our visit and replugged him when left.
 
I just avoid these types of chargers all together. J1772 chargers are for people who don’t have range or supercharger access. As someone who drove a 100 mile chadmeo enabled car for a few years, I know the pain. I plugged my Rav4 into a public j1772 once NEEDing a charge to get home, went in to watch a movie, and came out to my car unplugged and plugged into a Volt who parked in the neighboring handicap spot to take my charger and charge. I was furious, I’ll leave it at that.
If I can find a 110 outlet or a conpentent valet, great, if not I’ll park in a regular spot and charge at home.
 
So, all the folks that are saying that you should never unplug a J-1772 tend to be Tesla owners and have developed a different set of rules than the remainder of the EV world and are unaware of how charging works in the rest of the EV world.

First, if a car is actively charging, then it is bad etiquette to unplug it. But if the car has completed charging, then it can be accepted. Many commercial chargers limit that amount of charging and will turn off at some point.
Some cars, like the Leaf, have the ability to set the charging plug lock parameters. The classic etiquette for the Leaf is to leave it in auto unlock upon charge completion. This allows someone to use the charger when you are no longer needing it. It is also the custom that when you are finished charging and someone else has their charge port open (and its free charging) that you plug them in when finished. (The Leaf also has a always locked option that is useful when you are using your on EVSE, this keeps it from being stolen)

That said, the type and location of the charger is also important.
You mention that it was a long term lot an a Blink charger. First, that's a bad combination, a Blink J-1772 shouldn't have be installed in a long term lot, only short a medium term lots. The longest that anyone can ever charge at a J-1772 is with a Tesla and that's only about 8 hours. The Leafs max out about 4 hours.

So, first, "topping off" a Tesla at a J-1772 is bad etiquette at a long term lot. It would have really upset me in my 2015 Leaf if a Tesla clogged a charger for a week to top off, when my 88 mile battery range and 50 mile airport drive required me to charge at the airport.

In Atlanta, an off-airport parking facilities really supports EVs. It has about 50 spaces, each with a 120V outlet and is reserved for EVs. With my Model 3, I don't "need" to charge, but since they currently don't tend to fill the row, I do charge. I'm on a trip right now and as I plugged in, the car indicated that it needed just over 24 hours to charge.

So, the answer to the question. Did your friend require a charge? Or was he topping off. If topping off, then it was not the best etiquette to unplug the other car. The fact that the plugs were long and crossed spots doesn't have anything to do with it, because someone else was probably on the spot when the other Tesla plugged in.
If the Blink charger showed the state of charge, and it was obvious that the other car was complete, then unplugging would be acceptable.
The fact that your friend attempted to replug the other car was admirable and leaving a note on the other car indicating the situation would be the right thing to do. But, the possibility that you might leave a driver stranded, isn't a good one.

It also makes a BIG difference if the Blink chargers were free or paid.

But best option would be to use something like PreFlight parking that advertises that it has 120V plugs for EV charging.
 
I was at the airport parking Saturday morning. Oh no - two L2 chargers, and both plugged into vehicles! But, I took at look at the cars. And one of them had a note in the windshield "If green light is blinking, feel free to remove the charge cable." The green light was blinking so I got to charge.

Is there any equivalent on a Tesla? I'd love to be able to leave a note on my 3 "If XXX is happening, feel free to unplug the charge cable from my car. The Tesla adapter will remain attached to the car." The charging light goes out after 20 minutes, right? Can someone tug on a door handle to get the display to wake up and say "charging: 4:12 left"?

BTW - I was in the daily lot, parked there for 14 hours, charging for 10 of those hours. I feel that I made good usage of that charger.
 
So, all the folks that are saying that you should never unplug a J-1772 tend to be Tesla owners and have developed a different set of rules than the remainder of the EV world and are unaware of how charging works in the rest of the EV world.

First, if a car is actively charging, then it is bad etiquette to unplug it. But if the car has completed charging, then it can be accepted. Many commercial chargers limit that amount of charging and will turn off at some point.
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Sorry, some folks like to THINK it works like that, but as a long time member of the "rest of the EV world" I have to say that it's not so. You DON'T touch other people's cars without specific permission. I leave a note telling them they are inconveniencing others, but I don't touch their car.

I do have a little gizmo with rotating wheels that lets me display a time when I give permission to unplug my car, and I use it if there's any possibility whatsoever I could be caught away from the car when it should be unplugged. Airports are one of those tricky situations because, almost by definition, most folks are going to overstay their charging time. I use a long-term garage that has about 16 EV spaces with 120v outlets and another block of Tesla connectors, so I plug in and don't worry about hogging the space while I'm gone. It's a special case since they turn off the outlets for half of the day, and it would be hard to set a time which I could be sure that people could unplug me. Also, the operator leaves cones in front of the spaces which seems to keep them from being ICEd, and there always seem to be open spaces available. If they seemed more crowded, and there were adjacent spaces people could plug into from (there aren't), I'd probably use my placard.
 
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As a person that travels for work a week or more at a time it would be very nice to have a 110V plug to trickle charge my car. I’d set my charge limit to 60% until the day or two prior to arriving home, then bump it up to 80%. With a 90 minute commute to my house 100 miles from the airport I’d arrive home above 20%, even in the winter months.

Another option: Parking at a nearby hotel with a shuttle, with management’s permission, plug in to a wall outlet. I like this option because hotel management knows my car is there, likely there’s no competition for the outlet, my cable can’t be unplugged from my car and often the hotel lot is much cheaper per day than long term parking.
 
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if you plugging into 110v don't you have to worry about your evse being stolen?
The end that is plugged into the car locks with the car. The most you can lose is the 120v adapter. But if the thief is determined, I’d imagine it is not that difficult to rip out the whole UMC from the car. It’s also a nice looking piece which may embolden the theft.