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An honest review of the yoke

gorilla83

Member
May 27, 2021
24
20
Thornton, PA
Great real world feedback in this thread. I came super close to pulling the trigger on the plaid as well, but really want to test drive one first (long range would be fine) before doing so. The mixed feedback here on the controls validates my gut feeling!
 

nilesborg

Member
Jul 8, 2021
31
67
San Francisco, CA
Great real world feedback in this thread. I came super close to pulling the trigger on the plaid as well, but really want to test drive one first (long range would be fine) before doing so. The mixed feedback here on the controls validates my gut feeling!

You'll have to find a friend willing to let you take the wheel - being sold out through Q3, entering orders for Q4 deliveries - there is no way these are making it to showrooms for test drives in 2021 my guess.
 
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gadelrosario

Member
Mar 18, 2021
238
520
Los Angeles, CA
My experience has been the polar opposite of the OP. First week was a bit rough, but after that, got quickly acclimated and felt the wheel and yoke were functionally a wash with the yoke offering better design and aesthetics. However, after a month, I have really become a fan of yoke + stalkless controls in terms of ergonomics and efficiency.

YMMV
Exactly this! I got accustomed to the yoke on the drive home from the Service Center and do not have undertake all the physical manipulations described by the OP in order to make turns. I really enjoy how my hands naturally position on the yoke and it really isn't a steep learning curve to make u turns, k-turns, sharp turns etc. The only nit I would pick is the horn button though I know that covering the right side of the yoke with is supposed to toot the horn. Driving around in LA, there's not much reason to use the horn anyway.
 

Tiger

Active Member
Oct 31, 2016
1,700
1,265
Estonia
I think this will be just like the single center screen when the 3 came out. People claimed it would be distracting and you have to take your eyes off the road etc. and its turned out to be a big nothing burger. Its different, you get used to it in a few days, and move on. If you truly hate it, the aftermarket will come to your rescue. Its ridiculous to claim "People will die from this design, all in the name of cool". Just stop. Tesla is not the first to play with steering wheel design and won't be the last. Wildest steering wheels ever made

And the ones who disagree can get an aftermarket fix, same as can be done for the missing center screen.

I choose not trust my (or my passengers, or other nearby road travelers) life with neither yoke nor fsd.
 
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Hayseed_MS

Who's the Good Doge?
Jan 19, 2021
1,907
8,618
Strongbadia
Exactly this! I got accustomed to the yoke on the drive home from the Service Center and do not have undertake all the physical manipulations described by the OP in order to make turns. I really enjoy how my hands naturally position on the yoke and it really isn't a steep learning curve to make u turns, k-turns, sharp turns etc. The only nit I would pick is the horn button though I know that covering the right side of the yoke with is supposed to toot the horn. Driving around in LA, there's not much reason to use the horn anyway.

I gave you a thumbs up. I would have given you a heart but I know you are just making all the good things about the yoke up in your head...
 
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Tiger

Active Member
Oct 31, 2016
1,700
1,265
Estonia
My experience has been the polar opposite of the OP. First week was a bit rough, but after that, got quickly acclimated and felt the wheel and yoke were functionally a wash with the yoke offering better design and aesthetics. However, after a month, I have really become a fan of yoke + stalkless controls in terms of ergonomics and efficiency.

YMMV

I believe it depends on your driving style, if it is very "predictable" and you can plan your hand positions, yoke is probably fine. Can't take the driving style out of the man.
 

gadelrosario

Member
Mar 18, 2021
238
520
Los Angeles, CA
No. Are you not able to respond to anything that is critical of Tesla without making wild assumptions?

Still waiting for a VALID reason to literally re-invent the wheel. So far we have “better view of the dash” and “looks” cool. I was hoping for more but it seems like people around here lose their minds when the dear leader’s decisions are questioned.
My experience is completely subjective but I feel that I actually am in better control of the vehicle with the yoke.
 

gadelrosario

Member
Mar 18, 2021
238
520
Los Angeles, CA
Could that be beginner's luck? You're focusing on driving more now because it's new.
Being my first Tesla, everything about the car is a new experience, yoke included. I suppose driving with the yoke is rolled into my first time using the touchscreen, the yoke buttons, etc. Having driven ICE cars all my life, I have to say that the MS LR is far and away the best car I've ever driven.
 

WilliamG

Active Member
Apr 20, 2019
3,990
5,274
Seattle, WA
Having some more wheel... uh... yoke time with the Plaid, I maintain it's utter crap. Terrible. In no way at all does it make you a better driver, unless you count how you have to expend so much effort to pay attention to which direction the yoke is so you can turn signal safely. It's bad. This is nothing like the arguments against the Model 3 screen, because hey - guess what - you never need to interact with the screen while driving if you don't want to. With the yoke, that's all you interact with. Everything is harder with the yoke. It looks awesome, it's fun in a straight line, it's a step back, and I don't believe for a second that the yoke is going to come to the Model 3/Y in its current iteration. No way, no how.
 

Dan D.

Member
Dec 7, 2020
670
751
Vancouver, BC
I've had my refresh LR MS for a few weeks now. (...)
The screen started flashing at me. Very screwy, something definitely wrong. (...) I had several errors on dash screen. (emergency brake, traction, etc). Tried a soft reset.

Car came back up. Problems persisted. (...) But no power steering. Turning this car at low speeds with a yoke and no steering assist is no yoke.
(...)
I tried to pull a K (3 point) turn while this was going on. Took 4 points to get there.
This owner lost power steering and said the yoke is difficult to turn at low speeds. I can imagine this is one downside of the yoke.
 
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lurker131

MSLR: MSM/Cream/21/FSD Ord:2/14 RN1145 V433 D:7/3
Jun 6, 2021
64
389
SoCal
Anyone drive around mountain roads. How are you speeds compared to avg car going around. Very interested in choosing life.
No problem with the curves - but in full disclosure, I have found NO problem driving with yoke or stalkless. (I am a button-pusher by nature, and a 9-3 driver from the get-go). The yoke is easy for me drive curvy windy roads; easy to use regen in and accelerate the bejesus out with full control. That does suck up a lot of range, though, so I may need to adjust when hitting a lot of uphill. My biggest problem is I don't know how WIDE the car is and on skinny 2-way curvy roads feel a little nervous
 

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