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Anti-roll bars

wiztecy

Active Member
Apr 29, 2012
2,905
564
Santa Cruz, California, United States
I talked to Rob about adding an adjustable rollbar up front, he said I didn't need it with the adjustable suspension. If I was autocrossing I'd put one on the front, possibly an adjustable on the rear. People typically soften the springs in the front and set the adjustment, forget which hole, so it transitions the weight from the soft springs more over the front wheel and the roll bar then locks it / plants it.

If I had extra cash to spend it would be fun to play around with but I don't think I'd see too much of an improvement on the street.
 

wiztecy

Active Member
Apr 29, 2012
2,905
564
Santa Cruz, California, United States
What about the rear? That's where I see the problem on tight curves.

We have a pretty nice sized one there, the antiswaybar. I believe its the same size/thickness as the adjustable, but I never measured. Rob said the Elises and Exiges never came with a rear antisway bar in the rear, and I also believe that he said that the front swaybar was smaller than the Roadster's too. I could be wrong, never compared them.

I feel the Roadster is fine on the street if properly setup. My front hooks up amazingly and the rear sticks right in there, your negative camber is a huge influence with this. Also I'm not feeling any bodyroll that's of any concern nor needs to be addressed with the Nitrons. If that's a worry, one could lower the Roadster some with the adjustable suspension. If you want more bite up front, you can play around with the camber and with the relationship between the front and back traction. But like any tuning, you have to understand what your modifying, and how it affects the overall performance of the car and learn how it behaves in multiple conditions and inputs.

The roll I feel is the Aluminum frame flexing, its called cowling. Since our sills / tub was cut down lower for easy entry, we lost a serious frame support that helps stabilize the side to side and twisting and flexing forces the frame undertakes. Putting in a full rollcage would help stiffen the frame back up. The twisting flex takes its toll on handling, takes away from some contact ability the tires have to the road, and also diminishes the input the driver receives front the car from the wheels to and through the steering wheel as well as the way the body is connected to the ground in terms of feel for the road.
 
Last edited:

asgard

Member
Aug 17, 2013
310
9
CA
The roll I feel is the Aluminum frame flexing, its called cowling. Since our sills / tub was cut down lower for easy entry, we lost a serious frame support that helps stabilize the side to side and twisting and flexing forces the frame undertakes. Putting in a full rollcage would help stiffen the frame back up. The twisting flex takes its toll on handling, takes away from some contact ability the tires have to the road, and also diminishes the input the driver receives front the car from the wheels to and through the steering wheel as well as the way the body is connected to the ground in terms of feel for the road.

The side-to-side rear sway problem really manifests itself when you hit a bump on a curve. The car tends to slip and slide - feels really loose.
I happened to drive a 2.0 that had the anti-roll package and the side to side sway was definitely improved.
 

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