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Any 19" forged / lightweight wheel pics and recommendations?

Dukeybootie

Member
Nov 12, 2015
218
129
United States
Closing in on 100k miles with my 2015 85D and considering a functional upgrade in the form of lighter, stronger wheels. Preferably able to take OEM tire size. Loved the Titan7 TR10 design but they aren't making them for the Model S. Most searches only turn up 20" and 21" options -- anyone here know of 19" wheels that fit the bill?
 

Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,515
3,552
Colorado, USA
Closing in on 100k miles with my 2015 85D and considering a functional upgrade in the form of lighter, stronger wheels. Preferably able to take OEM tire size. Loved the Titan7 TR10 design but they aren't making them for the Model S. Most searches only turn up 20" and 21" options -- anyone here know of 19" wheels that fit the bill?

I went with the Arachnid replicas from TSportline in 19" which are far lighter than the 21" Turbines I had previously. I also love the look of them in black on my MC Red P85D. Ties the room together nicely. Bonus: since they look similar to the OEM 21" black arachnids you can opt to have your screen & app show that wheel to keep your OCD in check. Sure the OEM ones are larger but you don't really notice this on your screens. If you're interested in anything from TSportline hit me up via private message for a code for $50 off.
 
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SilverGS

Active Member
Nov 3, 2016
1,606
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Ontario
I went with the Arachnid replicas from TSportline in 19" which are far lighter than the 21" Turbines I had previously. I also love the look of them in black on my MC Red P85D. Ties the room together nicely. Bonus: since they look similar to the OEM 21" black arachnids you can opt to have your screen & app show that wheel to keep your OCD in check. Sure the OEM ones are larger but you don't really notice this on your screens. If you're interested in anything from TSportline hit me up via private message for a code for $50 off.
Do you have any recent pics of your car with these wheels on? Curious to see what the ride height is compared to the stock 19's. I imagine they would be the same.

Did you go with the 275 width tire for the rear wheels? If you did, do you mind posting a pic shot from low to the ground and directly behind the car? TIA!
 

Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,515
3,552
Colorado, USA
Do you have any recent pics of your car with these wheels on? Curious to see what the ride height is compared to the stock 19's. I imagine they would be the same.

Did you go with the 275 width tire for the rear wheels? If you did, do you mind posting a pic shot from low to the ground and directly behind the car? TIA!
img_20190627_185903_389-jpg.424271


The tires I went with for these 19" wheels are 245/45/19
 
Jan 25, 2019
452
689
California
Closing in on 100k miles with my 2015 85D and considering a functional upgrade in the form of lighter, stronger wheels. Preferably able to take OEM tire size. Loved the Titan7 TR10 design but they aren't making them for the Model S. Most searches only turn up 20" and 21" options -- anyone here know of 19" wheels that fit the bill?

Let me help you with your 19” forged setup.

Here is our Signature SV104 on Raven P100D, the customer wants to reuse stock 245/45/19 tire and keeping stock width but more aggressive offset.

-OEM 19x8 ET40 weight 28lb each
-Fully Forged Signature SV104 19x8 ET20 weight 19.2lb each
-Brushed Finish
-1/4 mile 10.5 sec

Our Summer sale are ending very soon, send me a message if you are interested, and don’t miss out of our sale.

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Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,515
3,552
Colorado, USA
Let me help you with your 19” forged setup.

Here is our Signature SV104 on Raven P100D, the customer wants to reuse stock 245/45/19 tire and keeping stock width but more aggressive offset.

-OEM 19x8 ET40 weight 28lb each
-Fully Forged Signature SV104 19x8 ET20 weight 19.2lb each
-Brushed Finish
-1/4 mile 10.5 sec

Our Summer sale are ending very soon, send me a message if you are interested, and don’t miss out of our sale.

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19.2lbs is good and I like the style of these. I didn't get a chance to weigh those 19" Arachnid replicas I posted about earlier but TSportline lists them at 23lbs. So about 5lbs more than the 19.2 you posted about but a full 12lbs less than the stock 21" Turbines to put it into perspective. I also prefer the look of the Arachnids and the ability to have my displays and app show a visual representation of my car that's the same as how it looks in RL. Having some rim that doesn't look like what's on my car would drive me nuts but that's just me.
 

quickstrike12

Member
Jun 13, 2018
622
462
Fort Worth Texas
I only have 237 miles at 100% these days so I am trying to squeeze out all efficiencies I can. I have OEM 19s.
does a super light wheel help in any real measurable amount. I understand fully the ideas behind weight and rolling resistance etc.....but don’t have any quantitative data to know just how much if any it changes.

Anyone that has done this with some data to support? I would easily purchase wheels for the look and gains if they were enough
 

Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,515
3,552
Colorado, USA
I only have 237 miles at 100% these days so I am trying to squeeze out all efficiencies I can. I have OEM 19s.
does a super light wheel help in any real measurable amount. I understand fully the ideas behind weight and rolling resistance etc.....but don’t have any quantitative data to know just how much if any it changes.

Anyone that has done this with some data to support? I would easily purchase wheels for the look and gains if they were enough

"Only" 237 miles? Where do you go where that can't get you? I know that when we drive day-to-day for our typical commute we only use about 5-10% of our full range and recover within a half hour or so. On longer commute days we still don't even use half of our 250 mile estimated range. Our degradation could be over 50% and we would never notice it for 95% of our driving. We road trip a fair amount and I don't envision the battery degradation from a 5-year-old car would even be noticeable if it still had the max capacity of when it was new. People seem to talk a lot of max range and degradation but I have to wonder how much of that is actually noticeable in the real world rather than on paper.

The gains are, again, barely noticeable in the real world. On paper the nav will say we should arrive at the next Supercharger at say 20% and when we arrive this usually is a few percent higher. My guess is that it could be from the weight savings on the wheels/tires but could also be attributed to it being an estimation and not an exact science. Anything I've noticed is anecdotal and not scientific. It should be noted that any gains from this won't be significant enough to exceed the margin of error for the estimates to put it into perspective and bring it back to my original point of this post... people put entirely too much thought into these numbers.
 
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SilverGS

Active Member
Nov 3, 2016
1,606
929
Ontario
"Only" 237 miles? Where do you go where that can't get you? I know that when we drive day-to-day for our typical commute we only use about 5-10% of our full range and recover within a half hour or so. On longer commute days we still don't even use half of our 250 mile estimated range. Our degradation could be over 50% and we would never notice it for 95% of our driving. We road trip a fair amount and I don't envision the battery degradation from a 5-year-old car would even be noticeable if it still had the max capacity of when it was new. People seem to talk a lot of max range and degradation but I have to wonder how much of that is actually noticeable in the real world rather than on paper.

The gains are, again, barely noticeable in the real world. On paper the nav will say we should arrive at the next Supercharger at say 20% and when we arrive this usually is a few percent higher. My guess is that it could be from the weight savings on the wheels/tires but could also be attributed to it being an estimation and not an exact science. Anything I've noticed is anecdotal and not scientific. It should be noted that any gains from this won't be significant enough to exceed the margin of error for the estimates to put it into perspective and bring it back to my original point of this post... people put entirely too much thought into these numbers.
I couldn't agree more. Everyone just seems to "obsess" needlessly about this all the time. I had a discussion about this with my wife this morning - she mentioned that she had watched some video and someone mentioned that the range drops significantly in the winter. I mentioned that I had read its about ~40% loss (not my personal experience as I have not yet had my car in the winter so far - I just got it 3 months ago). And she had this look on her face "wow, that much loss????". Well even at that much loss, our day to day driving is roughly 40 to 65 miles. So even if the battery loses 50% in range, we will have a theoretical 105 miles range at the beginning of the day (charging to 90%). Which is more than enough for daily driving. If we go on a trip in the winter and lose say 30% range, that still leaves us with 175 miles (charging to 100%) which is long enough to stop for a quick break anyway.
 

Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,515
3,552
Colorado, USA
I couldn't agree more. Everyone just seems to "obsess" needlessly about this all the time. I had a discussion about this with my wife this morning - she mentioned that she had watched some video and someone mentioned that the range drops significantly in the winter. I mentioned that I had read its about ~40% loss (not my personal experience as I have not yet had my car in the winter so far - I just got it 3 months ago). And she had this look on her face "wow, that much loss????". Well even at that much loss, our day to day driving is roughly 40 to 65 miles. So even if the battery loses 50% in range, we will have a theoretical 105 miles range at the beginning of the day (charging to 90%). Which is more than enough for daily driving. If we go on a trip in the winter and lose say 30% range, that still leaves us with 175 miles which is long enough to stop for a quick break anyway.
Separate topic but from someone who has owned multiple Model S's in Colorado through the winter time: the efficiency drops around 25% or so. The higher #'s you see on EVs tend to be Leaf and similar that have next to no battery temp control system and experience 40%+ hit in efficiency. For some reason people think all EVs are the same and that applies to all of them. Funny how they don't take the EV that is best at this aspect and assume the best across all EVs. Fun fact; You know what else goes down about 25% or so in the winter time in Colorado? MPG of a gas powered car. Not many people bring that point up whenever bashing EVs for their "horrid" efficiency in the winter months. Summary: machinery doesn't like to operate in the bitter cold.

Back on topic....

People stress way too much IMO about the marginal numbers that they will never notice a real world difference in. I, too, was guilty of this before I bought my first Tesla and for the first several months. It's like the MSM and FUD brainwashes you into thinking these figures are all-important and your life will revolve around them. Once you start driving the things daily and road tripping them you will quickly realize that it would take something like a 50% battery degradation to even notice it. Much like MPG in an ICE car, a couple of minor differences in either direction really have zero impact on your day-to-day life. Otherwise you're talking slightly longer stops at Superchargers and who really cares about a few minutes here and there over a 2k mile road trip?
 
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quickstrike12

Member
Jun 13, 2018
622
462
Fort Worth Texas
I guess my post sounded like I was concerned during daily drives.
I’ve been driving my model S for couple years now. I was only asking because of some road trips I sometimes take that have me arriving with very minimal charge remaining so I was just looking for a few extra miles of buffer when stretching some longer trips. 5-10 miles gained over 200 mile trip would change things for my comfort level.
 

SSedan

Active Member
Jul 24, 2017
2,948
2,323
Greenville Wisconsin
IMO aero losses will be worse than weight reduction gains.
On winter this focus on percentage is misplaced. I see a greater than 40% but that is because I have see -20f and a short commute. This means the heater is running hard the whole drive i have seen my 5 mile average go over 800 and fall to low 700s by the time I park. Now on a 100mile trip the initial cabin heat has much less effect.
 
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Jan 25, 2019
452
689
California
The lighter wheels won’t necessarily get you the most range. Tires really do the most in that department. Aero second and weight last I think.

That’s correct, lighter wheel won’t necessarily get you the most range, the design is also very important. (Aerodynamic)

One of the biggest reason to go with lighter wheel is to improve the acceleration/ decelerations as well as the steering response.
 
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Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,515
3,552
Colorado, USA
The lighter wheels won’t necessarily get you the most range. Tires really do the most in that department. Aero second and weight last I think.
Yes and no.

While it's true that overall weight is further down on the list, unsprung weight is a huge factor in efficiency, handling and power delivery. This is why it's such a tremendous focus (in race applications especially) and why you see such crazy exotic weight saving efforts made in terms of tires, wheels and the brake components. Tremendous costs are invested in those components for merely trimming ounces off of the weight.

The reason for this is simple physics: each pound of unsprung weight is equivalent to 7lbs of weight elsewhere. Simply put, shaving 10lbs off of one wheel equals 70lbs elsewhere in the vehicle. Multiply this times four and you get 280lbs of comparable weight savings elsewhere in the vehicle just from choosing a lighter wheel. This is no small number even on a 5k pound vehicle.

These are just general numbers for conversation sake of course.

In my case, I saved 12lbs per wheel & roughly 3lbs per tire making my total savings per axle right about 15lbs. Take that times four and you get 60lbs times another 7 for being unsprung weight savings and you get a figure of about 420lbs of comparable weight savings elsewhere in the vehicle from simply changing to a better looking (IMHO) and better performing year-round (since I can run an all-season tire on a 19") wheel. His wheels are ~3lbs lighter so this equates to ~84lbs lighter than even my setup. It starts to become an ROI v. what you think looks good debate but you get where this all goes.

Keep in mind that for deceleration regenerative braking will actually suffer slightly in terms of regained energy because, again, physics. This figure is so insignificant though it's hardly even worth mentioning but I only mention it in the interest of full disclosure. The gains from efficiency over the life of your vehicle will be 10,000x more than the energy lost in regen but there will be certain fringe instance where, for a moment in time, your regen would have been better with heavier wheels/tires/brakes.
 

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