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Any way to program Homelink without handheld remote?

Discussion in 'Model S: User Interface' started by derekt75, Dec 31, 2012.

  1. derekt75

    derekt75 Member

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    My other cars haven't needed a handheld remote, and I didn't get one when I got the house.
    I tried using another car near the Tesla, but the Tesla keeps saying "Searching"

    Do I need to buy a handheld one just so I can program the Tesla?
     
  2. ggr

    ggr Roadster R80 537, SigS P85 29

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    Traditionally there are two kinds of remotes, ones with a fixed code, and newer ones with a rolling code. The instructions say to use the existing opener inside the car, so that the car unit can detect that it isn't, in fact, a fixed code. You can do this by just waiting it out, without pressing anything. Then you press the "learn" button on the actual opener, and tell the car to transmit, and it will transmit its own rolling code, which the opener will then figure out and remember. You should be fine.
     
  3. derekt75

    derekt75 Member

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    How do I tell the car to transmit?

    I try to program "Left". It searches and fails to find anything after 5 minutes or so. It gives me the option of trying again. Trying again just repeats the loop. I can also cancel. If I cancel, then Left is labeled as "Not Programmed", and pushing the button doesn't seem to do anything.
     
  4. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    I didn't need a handheld remote to program Homelink on other cars. I doubt it's required for the Model S either. However, it might be dependent upon the type of garage door opener you have. The thing to do is find the instructions (online) for your garage door opener, then use a combination of the two instructions to make the Homelink work.
     
  5. derekt75

    derekt75 Member

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    The problem is that I can't figure out how to convince Model S to send out a signal. As far as I can tell, if it doesn't find a signal from a remote, it won't do anything since it's "not programmed". I have a wall mounted combination remote, and I tried driving the Model S so that the front bumper is near that. It wouldn't pick up the signal from the combination remote, and I haven't gotten it to pick up the signal from my wife's car.

    Incidentally, I have two garage doors I need to program. They're both run of the mill 10 year old LiftMasters.
     
  6. NEWDL

    NEWDL R#350 R#1323 Sig23 8136

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    I have always found the answer to this question to be no. Even if you borrow a neighbors opener to program it to your door,
    Program your s, then program it back to your neighbors door...

    But more concerning in my opinion is how did you manage to loose 2-4 garage door
    Openers?
     
  7. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    Is there a training button the garage door opener? Usually you need to press that and then press the Homelink button.
     
  8. derekt75

    derekt75 Member

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    The guy I bought the house from wasn't the most organized.
    He still had his junk in the house days after closing and he wasn't paying me rent. Getting garage door openers from him was not a significant concern of mine.

    - - - Updated - - -

    yes, there is. but the Model S's homelink button doesn't seem to do anything when it's "not programmed".

    I guess I can go to Target and get a replacement remote. I suppose having a handheld remote isn't a terrible idea, anyway.
     
  9. William13

    William13 Member

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    I did not realize that my door opener mounted on the wall was battery operated and mobile until earlier this year. Perhaps yours are also.

    This was also my concern, though because the old remotes died.
     
  10. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    Unfortunately, without a transmitter there isn't much you can do. The car uses the transmitter to sense whether it's an old-style non-rolling-code transmitter, a 310 MHz transmitter, a 315 MHz transmitter, or a 390 MHz transmitter. Without these, the car would have to generate and transmit multiple signals all the time (because it's a one-way mechanism, and the car wouldn't know which of the various version of Security+ are in use by your opener). There could be an "advanced mode", I guess, that would allow you to configure it, but since most people have a remote anyway, it makes sense to detect it.
     
  11. derekt75

    derekt75 Member

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    I'm just saying I've programmed two other cars' Homelink (Merc and Lexus) without a handheld remote so it can be done. I understand why Tesla would want to set things up to read the signal from an existing transmitter, but other car manufacturers have other solutions.

    Pulling the wall mounted remote off of the wall, and holding it in front of the bumper did work. Odd that on a wall 4' high, 4' away from the bumper failed, but in my hand, 2' high, 2' away from the bumper worked. Is the search really that sensitive to signal strength?

    Anyway, the car can open one door now, but not the other, as the wall mounted remote doesn't work with the other door, either. maybe it's the wrong frequency?
     
  12. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    My experience with my non-rolling-code transmitter was rather horrible. Took 3-4 tries for my DS and I to do it right, and then when I had to re-program it (after the GPS issue was fixed), it took another 20 minutes for the ranger and I to do it. Also required a new battery in the transmitter.

    It's likely you have two different frequencies in your openers. They've changed over the years -- see the table here, about halfway down the page.

    In theory, Tesla should be able to do this by asking you to press the learn button on the opener, then sending messages on the three different frequencies, then ask you to hit the button until the door opens so it knows which frequency you're on. Alternatively, they could just choose to send 3 signals each time you push the button too - one on each frequency.

    Like other subsystems in the car, they may have a Homelink module from a third-party manufacturer, and they've just made it work for now based upon the traditional GM-style "hold the transmitter here" method.
     

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