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Anyone charge on the standard 110V outlet ONLY?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by jay-bay, Sep 18, 2014.

  1. jay-bay

    jay-bay Member

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    I pick up my Model S in December and was curious to know if anyone only charges on 110V outlets at home and no HWPC? I will be plugging my car in every night and don't foresee any particular needs to charge "quickly" that would justify me to install a 240V. Plus I'm renting my home, so I doubt my landlord would approve to install a 240V anyway.
     
  2. tom66

    tom66 Member

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  3. jay-bay

    jay-bay Member

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    Daily commute is around 66-70 miles per day...
     
  4. miimura

    miimura Active Member

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    That's right, but you should also have a backup place where you can charge faster if you need to. You may find yourself running a range deficit several days in a row and having a place to charge back to full in a reasonable time is necessary. Could be Supercharger, service center, or any other public charging station. Could even be a friend's house that has a home charger on 240V.

    - - - Updated - - -

    If you plug in to 120V 12A (normal US household socket) 12 hours a day and drive 75 miles per day, you will have a 40 mile deficit per day. So, during the work week you will be down 200 miles. You need someplace that delivers more power to plug in to recover that deficit on the weekend or any time you drive more than your normal pattern. You should really look into getting a higher power socket installed at your rental place.
     
  5. Chris

    Chris Member

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    Jay, my commute is also 70 miles and I had to use a 110 outlet for a few days before the HPWC was installed. And I needed it because of an accumulating deficit. Charging is just not fast enough on a standard outlet, unless you can plug in at work (or your work days are exceptionally short ;-)

    Also, whenever it gets colder you don't even get the 3mile/h
     
  6. Tacket

    Tacket Member

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    You have a dryer in your garage or close by? I used my dryer's 240V for several months before getting a dedicated NEMA14-50 installed.

    120V is really slow. If you've got a place to plug in 120V at work would also be an option.
     
  7. SmartElectric

    SmartElectric Active Member

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    The efficiency of the Tesla and Smart are not so different on the highway.

    I plug my Smart EV into 120V when I get home at 6pm. I leave at 8am. That is 14 hours.
    At a rate of 7km of range added per hour, I can comfortable add 100km of range overnight.

    As original poster noted, the commute in question is 100km (60 miles) or perhaps more.
    Therefore, it is impractical to stick with 120V in that case.

    You will need a 240V EVSE.

    Me, I'm fine with my 120V EVSE.
    But that will change when the Model 3 is sitting in my driveway...
     
  8. Crispix

    Crispix Member

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    I've only charged a few times on 110v. It's excruciating. Let's say you run a 20-30 mile deficit on days when you commute. That's -150 miles during the work week. If you charge for ~60 hours (From Friday night to Monday morning) over the weekend, you can make it up and start the following week with a full charge, but this only works as long as you don't drive on the weekend.

    It could work if you find some backup options. Maybe a place to charge faster on the weekends? Or maybe you can reach your dryer outlet?

    Oh wait, just thought of something -- you might be able to convert one of your outlets to NEMA 5-20 if you can put it on a 20A circuit? That would increase your charge rate to around 5mph and could solve it right there.
     
  9. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    You really will want a NEMA 14-50 then. I bet if you tell your landlord you'll pay for everything they will let you. It is an improvement to the property.
     
  10. jay-bay

    jay-bay Member

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    Thanks everyone for the input. Looks like a I will need to go with the NEMA 14-50 after all.
     
  11. Chris TX

    Chris TX Active Member

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    110V Outlet is going to be painfully slow, even if it's dedicated.
    Your options could be:

    30A outlet for dryer (10-30 or 14-30)
    50A outlet behind oven (10-50, 5-50, or 6-50 can be adapted to 14-50. I've used this with great success)
    110V x 2 using combiner for [email protected] which is still better than 110V.

    Go in your breaker box and see if you have any 50A breakers, then see where they are going. Then, see if there is room in there for another 50A 2-pole breaker. If the box is near the car's charge port, getting a ~2ft run to a wall mount box shouldn't be a big deal for the landlord.
     
  12. GSP

    GSP Member

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    As others have posted, 120 V is not good for 66-70 miles per day. You could:

    1) use a dryer outlet. Purchasing a Tesla 10-30 or 14-30 UMC adapter, and probably a 240 V 30 A extension cord, will be required
    2) install a lower current 240 V outlet to save money. With 240 a Volts, even a 12 A 6-15 outlet would be enough. Just change the circuit breaker and the outlet from 120 to 240 V. If the wiring is good for 20 A, then a 16 A 6-20 outlet would be a great solution. Adapters, both Tesla and third party, will be needed.
    3) install a 24 A 10-30 or 14-30 outlet, and get the appropriate adapter from Tesla.
    4) install a 120 V, 16 A 5-20 outlet to get maybe 5 mph. You need to get the Tesla adapter. I don't recomend this, it is too marginal for 66-70 mi/day. You need some sort of 240 V solution.

    GSP
     
  13. wraithnot

    wraithnot Model S VIN #5785

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    I've been surviving on a standard outlet since moving to San Rafael in April, but I only have a 26 mile round trip commute. My wife also uses the Model S one or two days a week for a 50 mile round trip to commute to San Francisco, but she has less of a lead foot than I do. I charge at around 3.4 miles per hour (a 60 kWh should do slightly better given the better MPGe) so normally everything works fine. But every so often a weekend trip or my wife borrowing the car a few days in a row starts to run a range deficit. Originally my only options were to go to a public L2 charger or find an excuse to go to either the Vacaville or Fremont superchargers, but this got old pretty quickly. Then I read Cosmacelf's excellent charging adapter tutorial http://cosmacelf.net/Home%20Made%20Adapters.pdf and realized I could build an adapter for our NEMA 10-30 dryer outlet inside the house then use my NEMA 14-50 extension cord to reach the garage (I labelled the adapter very clearly for "Tesla charging only" and dialed the charge rate down to 24 Amps to keep from blowing the 30A breaker). I only need to use this about twice a month so my wife tolerates having a giant extension cord running through the kitchen overnight. We're planning to get solar installed in the near future and that seems like a good time to finally get a NEMA 14-50 installed in the garage like I had at the previous house. But for the moment I can make things work without a 14-50 in the garage.
     
  14. Brunton

    Brunton Pontificating the obvious

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    YIKES!
    Chris, why did you wind up with the car before the HPWC was installed? I'll be dependent on my HPWC to charge each night, as I'll be driving about 190 miles per day. My biggest anxiety is that I'll have the car and it will sit in the garage because my HPWC won't show up early enough to get it installed in time. Did your HPWC arrive too late for a timely installation?
     
  15. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

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    NEMA 14-50 or better.

    Charging on 110V makes me super mega cranky.
     
  16. jrreno

    jrreno Nothin' left to do but smile, smile, smile

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    I have a dedicated 120v/20a receptacle in the garage so I can charge at 5mph.( requires the 20 amp adapter)
    I use a Wattstation for my Leaf which is my daily drive.
    Even at 5mph you are looking at 14 hours to restore your 70 miles.
     
  17. Chris

    Chris Member

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    At the time I got my car in late 2012 there was a backlog of HPWCs. So for me it was 110, then NEMA 6-50, then HPWC. Ideally you should have all the charging infrastructure in place before your MS arrives. Should not be an issue anymore. Amazing how far we have come in only a few years time. I remember the blank stares from electricians when I asked them to install a 100 A circuit in my garage!

    Wow, for 190 miles daily you will really need your HPWC. You ordered the dual chargers, right?
     
  18. freds

    freds Member

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    Can you charge during work hours?
     
  19. glhs272

    glhs272 Unnamed plug faced villian

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    If the 110 outlet is dedicated to that one outlet, you might also be able to convert it to a 6-20 (240 volt) after changing the breaker (assuming the in place wiring can is 20amp rated) or 6-15 if it is only 15 amp rated. This would double your charging rate. But this only works if the outlet is dedicated or if you are willing to block off any other outlets sharing that circuit. I was able to do this at my work where they had dedicated (one breaker per outlet) 110volt outlets.
     
  20. tezco

    tezco Sig P85

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    It is also possible to double your power by using an adapter that combines power from two different 120V legs in your house that are out of phase. See www.quick220.com If you have 15 amp breakers on the circuits, you would set the maximum charging current at 12 amps to avoid overheating your conductors and receptacles. This will give you 12 x 240 = 2880 watts as opposed to the 1440 you would get on 120V.
     

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