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Anyone notice a Model X shimmy?

Discussion in 'Model X: Driving Dynamics' started by EV-lutioin, Nov 6, 2016.

  1. EV-lutioin

    EV-lutioin Active Member

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    Mine has developed one. It occurs at about 70 mph and gets worse as I go up to 85 mph. I don't really drive faster than that so I am not sure if it gets worse or better at higher speeds. I also notice it anytime I accelerate briskly. I couldn't find any other thread on this issue, but perhaps there is one out there.
     
  2. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

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    Check tire pressure, check lug nut torque (it's supposed to be 175 Nm on Model S, not sure if the same on X but I would assume so). These are the most likely culprits.
     
  3. EV-lutioin

    EV-lutioin Active Member

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    I just checked the tire pressure recently and topped off two tires that were a couple PSI low (as indicated on the dash warning system). I guess I would need a torque wrench to test the lugs?
     
  4. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

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    Yes. Or you could unscrew them and then screw them on manually. If you know the length of your torquing tool it's very easy to work out how many pounds or kilos of pressure you put on it manually, you won't be far off the recommendation and it will be easy to pull all lugs equally.
     
  5. TardisLover70

    TardisLover70 New Member

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    I too have just recently gotten this shimmy. I thought it might have been a pothole putting one of my wheels out of round. I will check the lug nut torque when. I get home. I haven't touched the vehicle so if that is the culprit it is Tesla's fault from my first 15,000 mile service.
     
  6. Pandamoanium

    Pandamoanium Member

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    Can you describe the shimmy?
     
  7. TardisLover70

    TardisLover70 New Member

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    I can hear a noise at any highway speed, that noise increases in frequency (times per second the sound is heard, not the pitch of the sound). At about 70 mph, the sound is accompanied with a noticeable physical vibration in the whole vehicle (not just the steering column or pedals). That vibration becomes increasingly intense up to about 80-85 mph at which point in decreases until at about 95-100 mph it is no longer noticeable. This did not occur prior to my 15,000 mile service. I am having it checked two weeks from now along with the driver door getting its FORTH motor placed in it.
     
  8. vandacca

    vandacca ReActive Member

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    Check for nails or debris in the tire treads.
     
  9. goneskiian

    goneskiian Active Member

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    I had a shimmy in this speed range when I first got my X that was really only noticeable on super smooth brand new highway surfaces. Most highways around here are not that smooth but there are a few new sections that are and that's where I really felt this "shimmy". Also, the shimmy was felt through the seat which means the imbalance was in the rear wheels (If you feel it through the steering wheel it's the front wheels that need rebalancing). The service center ended up replacing the rear tires as they couldn't get them to balance correctly on the wheels. These were the 22" wheels. Low profile tires are harder to balance correctly and requires a road force balancer.

    Road Force Balancing | MotorWeek
     
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