Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Anyone seen damage like this to the jack points?

RDaneel

Member
Apr 3, 2016
162
174
New Jersey
Thanks for asking. Service told me they needed me to contact my delivery advisor. My delivery advisor apologized and said that service shouldn't have said that. A week ago he said that service would call me. Despite two calls, I have yet to receive a return call.

Honestly, Tesla service seems pretty shitty right now.
 

chasemym3

Member
Apr 10, 2018
41
16
Riverside, CA
Thanks for asking. Service told me they needed me to contact my delivery advisor. My delivery advisor apologized and said that service shouldn't have said that. A week ago he said that service would call me. Despite two calls, I have yet to receive a return call.

Honestly, Tesla service seems pretty shitty right now.

I feel ya man. When I picked mine up, the DC told me they'd call me to schedule a time to fix a paint crack I found and a week later I never received a call, nor would I hold my breath that they would. Only reason I'm getting it addressed now is because my door went psycho and started opening by itself on me so it's at the SC and getting both issues addresssed. The guy at the SC was really nice but I've received zero updates on what's going on with my car since I dropped it off 5 days ago. I always got constant updates when my previous two cars (Honda and Infiniti) were in the shop.

Regardless, as long as they fix it right, I'm good with it. Plus the new loaner model S I have is pretty nice so I'm not complaining :D
 

mspohr

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2014
9,116
10,594
California
First, the good news - I picked up my Model 3 today and it drives like a dream. The delivery center was great about adjusting the bumper slightly and made the whole experience very pleasant. Unfortunately, when I got my car to my detailers for film installation, I checked out the underside of the car and saw that both front jack points are mangled. I'll try to attach a pic. I'm really confused as to how this would happen. I can't imagine they jacked up the car to adjust the bumper, and if they did wouldn't they have used a big lift?

Anyone seen anything similar or know what would be involved in a fix? I've called the delivery center and sent pics, but am waiting on an answer... Thanks!
Looks like it was dragged along something (lift points?). You have linear scrapes and tearing of the jack point.
 

RDaneel

Member
Apr 3, 2016
162
174
New Jersey
Any updates? I'm very curious about how Tesla responded to your issue.

Just a quick update. I brought the car to my original pickup location (Springfield, NJ) and dropped it off with service. I was very appreciative to get a Model S 85 as a loaner rather than another ICE SUV. The S is about 4 years old, I think, and it is amazing how far Tesla has come! I can't believe I ever considered a used S over the 3, as the 3 is so far advanced.

Anyway, about the jack point damage, I got a call from a service lead. He walked me through a description of how rigorous the pre-delivery inspection is, how careful they are with the cars, etc., then indicated that his belief is that this was damaged caused by the shop that installed my lowering springs. He also stated that the damage is to the unibody and is "not repairable," and if I were to file an insurance claim that "the care would be totaled, they don't repair the unibody." While I saw red, I calmly explained how I, too, am stumped as to how this happened, as I had documented to Tesla that the damage existed about an hour after I picked up the car. I reminded them that I sent photos about 70 minutes after I left the showroom, and explained that the lowering springs were installed weeks later. I was asked to provide some documentation regarding when the springs were installed (which I emailed), and was told that they were "opening an engineering case" for this issue and I would get a call back. The gentleman was very polite and knowledgeable, but it is frustrating to have to keep explaining over and over that I could not have caused this damage in the amount of time I had the car. The lesson is: INSPECT YOUR MODEL 3 and DOCUMENT, DOCUMENT, DOCUMENT. If I didn't have the time stamps on the photos and my email to my delivery advisor on pickup day, it is 100% clear that Tesla would be telling me to pound sand.

Here's hoping that Tesla is able to come up with some proposal to make things right. It isn't helping my feelings to be told that this $50,000 car "would be totaled" due to irreparable damage that existed prior to delivery.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
15,128
32,394
Oregon
@RDaneel Thanks for the update, and please keep us updated on what happens.

Do you have in writing from Tesla that it is not repairable, meaning that your car has been totaled? That means the only resolution to this is you getting a new car.

That is actually what I expected, that it wouldn't be repairable, and I'm surprised that you went ahead with modifying your car before having Tesla inspect/repair it.

but it is frustrating to have to keep explaining over and over that I could not have caused this damage in the amount of time I had the car.

Well that isn't true, it probably took less than a minute to do that damage. You had the car 70 minutes prior to seeing/reporting the damage. So you could have caused it. (Or your car detailers could have, if they had the possession of your car between delivery and your finding the damage.)
 

RDaneel

Member
Apr 3, 2016
162
174
New Jersey
@RDaneel
Well that isn't true, it probably took less than a minute to do that damage. You had the car 70 minutes prior to seeing/reporting the damage. So you could have caused it. (Or your car detailers could have, if they had the possession of your car between delivery and your finding the damage.)

Yes, technically, point well taken. My view is that Tesla can believe one of two things:
1) customer took delivery of undamaged car, drove it *immediately* to a location with a non-compliant lift, damaged the car, and - within 70 minutes - provided photographic evidence of the damage and has then lied consistently about these events (including sending what must be fraudulent documentation that the springs were installed weeks later); or
2) car was damaged during production, or by the trucker, or the train transporter, or someone who lifted the car during the prep process or while adjusting the bumper, and the damage was discovered an hour after delivery.

I'm not saying #1 is impossible, but it feels like a stretch for Tesla to take such an anti-customer position. It is uncomfortable that they seem to be claiming that I'm trying to defraud them, which rubs me the wrong way. I'm hoping our next conversation is more productive.

Also, FWIW, my detailer doesn't have a lift. I guess I could prove that to Tesla, too. I wonder if my cell phone geotagged my photos, which would prove exactly where I was.

The question I am trying to answer is what the appropriate remedy is.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
15,128
32,394
Oregon
I'm not saying #1 is impossible, but it feels like a stretch for Tesla to take such an anti-customer position. It is uncomfortable that they seem to be claiming that I'm trying to defraud them, which rubs me the wrong way. I'm hoping our next conversation is more productive.

I can only hope that this is because they have never seen this before. You would think if it was a case of unloading the car multiple cars would have gotten hit with the damage. (Unless the transportation driver noticed the damage and adjusted the ramps to prevent it on the next cars in line. Which is probably likely, whoever did that damage knows that they did it.)

The other reason they might not have seen this before is that most people probably don't look under their car, so there could be more of them like this out in the wild. (But I hope not.)

The question I am trying to answer is what the appropriate remedy is.

The appropriate remedy is for them to replace your car. (Since they said it wasn't repairable.) However, I don't know if it would be appropriate for them to pay to move your lowering springs from your damaged car to the new car and to apply PPF to your new car. (I think they should, but they could argue that you shouldn't have done those modifications after finding the damage. But really how are you supposed to know that that "little" bit of damage would total the car?)
 
  • Like
Reactions: r1200gs4ok

voip-ninja

Give me some sugar baby
Mar 15, 2012
4,121
4,692
Colorado
Yes, technically, point well taken. My view is that Tesla can believe one of two things:
1) customer took delivery of undamaged car, drove it *immediately* to a location with a non-compliant lift, damaged the car, and - within 70 minutes - provided photographic evidence of the damage and has then lied consistently about these events (including sending what must be fraudulent documentation that the springs were installed weeks later); or
2) car was damaged during production, or by the trucker, or the train transporter, or someone who lifted the car during the prep process or while adjusting the bumper, and the damage was discovered an hour after delivery.

I'm not saying #1 is impossible, but it feels like a stretch for Tesla to take such an anti-customer position. It is uncomfortable that they seem to be claiming that I'm trying to defraud them, which rubs me the wrong way. I'm hoping our next conversation is more productive.

Also, FWIW, my detailer doesn't have a lift. I guess I could prove that to Tesla, too. I wonder if my cell phone geotagged my photos, which would prove exactly where I was.

The question I am trying to answer is what the appropriate remedy is.

From Tesla's point of view they are delivering 1000's of these cars and have specific processes in place to prevent exactly this kind of thing from happening. They almost certainly have a record of who transported the car, and they can follow up with that freight company. However, what happens if they follow up with the freight company and they refuse to take responsibility?

You might have to engage executive management at Tesla to make your case, or you can try to start up a small claims case but that's going to be tough due to the number of parties that have been involved since you took possession of the car.

Now, here's my .02.... which might not be popular, but nonetheless.

It is foolish to take deliver of $55,000+ car that has special jack points and a very easy to damage under body and then, knowing this, immediately take the car to shops that might have zero understanding or experience with Tesla model 3.

This would be the case for lower springs, after market wheels, fancy detail, etc....

At a minimum, I would photograph the cars condition including the jack points, point them out to the shop doing the work and make sure they understand there is a right way and a wrong way to lift the car.

Now.... at the end of the day, what's the final outcome.... are you going to hope that the car is going to be scrapped and a replacement vehicle provided since the damage, per Tesla, is not repairable? Will you accept some monetary compensation? It does not appear the damage is something that can be observed in any way while you are using and operating the car.

The lesson learned for others in all of this is to do a very careful inspection of the car BEFORE you drive off. Once you drive off trying to prove this kind of stuff is nearly impossible. If this kind of damage was observed before the car left the lot there would be zero question from anybody that Tesla and their sub-contractors would be responsible for fixing it or getting you another car.
 

RDaneel

Member
Apr 3, 2016
162
174
New Jersey
Now, here's my .02.... which might not be popular, but nonetheless.

It is foolish to take deliver of $55,000+ car that has special jack points and a very easy to damage under body and then, knowing this, immediately take the car to shops that might have zero understanding or experience with Tesla model 3.

At a minimum, I would photograph the cars condition including the jack points, point them out to the shop doing the work and make sure they understand there is a right way and a wrong way to lift the car.

These are good points. I don't think you're saying that this is what I did, but I agree that one should definitely notify anyone that would be lifting the car of how to do it properly. That was exactly what I was doing for my detailer (in the event they wanted to take the wheels off), when I noticed the damage. The detailer doesn't have a lift, and would have been using the same type of floor jack that I have and for which I purchased a jack adapter.

Now.... at the end of the day, what's the final outcome.... are you going to hope that the car is going to be scrapped and a replacement vehicle provided since the damage, per Tesla, is not repairable? Will you accept some monetary compensation? It does not appear the damage is something that can be observed in any way while you are using and operating the car.

That's a good question. I certainly have no desire to see the car scrapped. If I were Tesla, I certainly wouldn't want my service department telling a customer that their car would be "totaled." At the end of the day, I'd like them to accept the need to do a fix, and we'll work something out. It was mentioned that if you buy Tesla's winter wheels/tires, they give you lifetime seasonal swaps, including by a Ranger. That might be one way to resolve the situation, as my primary concern is being able to safely raise and lower the car to swap my wheels.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: navguy12

NickFie

Member
Sep 28, 2017
518
546
Near Philadelphia, PA
Now, here's my .02.... which might not be popular, but nonetheless.

It is foolish to take deliver of $55,000+ car that has special jack points and a very easy to damage under body and then, knowing this, immediately take the car to shops that might have zero understanding or experience with Tesla model 3.

This would be the case for lower springs, after market wheels, fancy detail, etc....

At a minimum, I would photograph the cars condition including the jack points, point them out to the shop doing the work and make sure they understand there is a right way and a wrong way to lift the car.

Now.... at the end of the day, what's the final outcome.... are you going to hope that the car is going to be scrapped and a replacement vehicle provided since the damage, per Tesla, is not repairable? Will you accept some monetary compensation? It does not appear the damage is something that can be observed in any way...
And while you’re waiting for delivery, get a set of jack adapters for your after-market shops to use with your car.
 
  • Like
Reactions: navguy12

RDaneel

Member
Apr 3, 2016
162
174
New Jersey
At long last, an update!

Just talked to service. They agreed that the damage was to the "ski rails" of the battery pack, and not to the car's frame. They offered to replace the pack with a new one. Given the potential delay (the packs being built now *may* be planned for vehicle production!), I'm also explorong whether they would like to provide an alternative remedy, assuming that the damage is confirmed to be irrelevant to the integrity of the pack (which appears to be the case). I'm glad and relieved that Tesla is stepping up to address the situation!
 

RDaneel

Member
Apr 3, 2016
162
174
New Jersey
Another uodupd, hopefully the last one. Tesla decided the only way they can feel 100% confident in the integrity of the pack for it's lifetime is to replace it, so they have ordered a new one. Given the production push, it may take a few weeks, but that is no problem for me. At the end of the day I'll end up with exactly what I wanted, a repaired Model 3 and the confidence that it will be safe to raise and lower when I change wheels. Maybe I'll get one of those fancy new packs that charges to 312 or 313 miles! ;-)
 

Rotarypower

Member
May 3, 2016
214
137
Cary, NC
Consider yourself very fortunate. To discover this issue after delivery and then to modify the car anyway with aftermarket add ons, in my opinion, wasn’t a smart move on your part and, diminished your negotiating power with Tesla to resolve the issue.

Glad it looks like you will get his resolved. I think there are many lessons learned here. The biggest one is to do a complete and 100% thorough checkout of the car upon delivery BEFORE you drive off the property. I have a 3 on order, I plan to demand my delivery take place in the morning, and will spend hours going through the car if I have to. So has anyone put together a list or spreadsheet of everything to look for during delivery? My guess is, based on all the issues that have plagued this forum, that it would be quite long!
 

super20g

Member
Jun 28, 2018
911
598
United States
The cars sit pretty low. Can you actually inspect the undercarriage on D day? Perhaps this particular damage, but can you check the whole undercarriage for damage? It sounds like they like to zip you through the delivery process really quickly.
 

vinnie97

#WalkAway
Jul 24, 2014
1,110
392
southwest
^You have to be pretty agile (and without decrepitude), and then you'll need a versatile flashlight with no shortage of lumens to boot. Planning to spend "hours" inspecting at delivery runs the risk of not making for a pleasant experience for anyone involved.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dennisvab

navguy12

Member
Apr 5, 2016
547
436
Eastern Ontario
Yes I agree. Thoughts on how long it will take to do a complete inspection?
When I did my 120 second "gross error check" prior to signing everything, I had my trusty hi-intensity LED flashlight with me.

The chassis inspection (all four sides) consisted of getting on hands and knees and shining the light up into the chassis.

It was obvious within two seconds that the chassis (on my car) was pristine.
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top