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Are tech geeks actually less likely to be early adopters?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by anticitizen13.7, May 14, 2016.

  1. anticitizen13.7

    anticitizen13.7 Enemy of the Status Quo

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    I read a lot of tech websites and know more about computers and tech than the vast majority of my family and friends. Despite this, I have one of the oldest computers among those in use in my circles, still use an iPhone 5, and don't own a Kindle, GoPro, Apple Watch, Oculus, or FitBit.

    I actually know some engineers who continue to use flip phones:D

    Are tech geeks paradoxically less likely to use tech gadgets? Most of my techie friends, for example, share my extreme reluctance to have more "stuff" (like refrigerators) connected to the Internet (the so-called "Internet of Things") because a lot of these have terrible or non-existent security settings. Maybe we watched too much Battlestar Galactica;)
     
  2. BluestarE3

    BluestarE3 Active Member

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    Maybe because tech geeks don't need to prove they are techies by showing off the latest and greatest tech accoutrements? Or they know how to maximize the potential of their current devices by performing hardware and software upgrades rather than throwing them out and buying brand new devices? Or they feel some devices haven't yet reached a level of maturity that provides them useful functionality? Or they are able to discern that some devices are just passing fads and don't bother with them at all?

    I was the first among my family and friends to have a home computer (Commodore PET), but I waited years after the introduction of the PC before I bought one. Since then, I've always built and upgraded my own systems. I was one of the first to have an MP3 player and digital camera, yet I waited years before I bought a cell phone (still use a flip phone today) or a flat screen TV. I was the first in my circle to buy a hybrid car, yet I still don't have or use a GPS. And I likely will be the first to own an all-electric car. So, yes, there are some peculiar contradictions... which I've never bothered to examine too closely. :)
     
  3. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Active Member

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    Some people love to experiment with new stuff, others don't.
     
  4. anticitizen13.7

    anticitizen13.7 Enemy of the Status Quo

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    Back in the 90's I built my computers and used them until they couldn't be upgraded anymore.

    A few of my college friends were into overclocking and hardware modification during the days when Pentium II was king. One of them wanted an exotic dual processor setup, but didn't have the money to set up a dual Xeon workstation, so he modded some relatively cheap Celerons (these had a small 128 kb on-die L2 cache, making them easier to overclock compared with the chips that had 512 kb external L2) and bumped up the system bus by 50%. 400+ MHz x2 system with some modest effort.
     
  5. S'toon

    S'toon Knows where his towel is

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    I still build my own computers. My computer is a direct descendant of the first computer I built. I upgrade parts as I need to keep up with changing demands. New video card as the games I play need more video memory, more RAM, better M/B CPU, bigger HDD, etc.

    As for tech, I am reluctant to go with the latest and greatest, just because it's the latest and greatest. If I don't need it, why should I buy it? I don't understand the impulse. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

    I don't understand why anybody would want or need "the internet of things."
     
  6. CmdrThor

    CmdrThor Member

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    I'd say it depends on the product. I built my own computers from the Pentium II days until I started using MacBook Pros around 2011. My first iPhone was the 3G and I've upgraded every 2-3 years. I still have one Windows PC for my HTPC, an Acer Revo running Windows 7 purchased in 2010. I recently upgraded its RAM, put a SSD in, and replaced the CPU fan that had gone bad and now the thing runs like it is brand new. I preordered the Apple Watch the first moment it was available, but I don't plan on upgrading whenever gen 2 comes out.

    So in general I would say tech geeks can recognize products that are worth being early adopters for and enjoying usage of the product before the general public, but they also know how to keep quality products running for many years that don't need to be discarded and upgraded.
     
  7. Skotty

    Skotty 2014 Model S P85

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    I love technology and am a software developer by trade, but I'm notorious for almost never upgrading my phone (I once received a letter warning me about analog cell service being shut down permanently because I was still using an analog cell phone). I have an iPhone now, but I only upgrade it when it breaks (currently on an 8 gigabyte iphone 4, which I bought when my previous phone died). I was also one of the last of my friends and family to switch from a tube monitor to an LCD. I do like to upgrade my computer and I build them myself, but I don't like paying for it, and since it's "fast enough", I haven't been upgrading it much either. I have almost no other geeky devices other than some robotics stuff.

    I suppose a lot of things I don't want to spend time or money on and don't really have a good use for. Why should I upgrade my phone? It makes calls just fine. I do like the Tesla app, but it runs fine on an iPhone 4, so no problem there. Meanwhile, I don't have time for gaming anymore and my computer is fast enough for my programming and web browsing. I stare at monitors almost all day every day, so if I actually stop to read a book, I'd rather have paper. So no interest in an e-reader. I love technology in general, I just don't have good use for a lot of it.
     

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