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Are the door exterior handle mechanical or electronic or both?

I wonder if there is a power failure and I must get the kids strapped in car seats in the back, will the door unlock when I pull the door handle? Since the doors are unlock by pushing a button inside, that lead me to think it may be motorized lock. I am speaking about a power failure and not in a crash which Tesla said the doors would unlock in that case. What if the car is on fair and power shut down? How to I get the door open?
 
I wonder if there is a power failure and I must get the kids strapped in car seats in the back, will the door unlock when I pull the door handle? Since the doors are unlock by pushing a button inside, that lead me to think it may be motorized lock. I am speaking about a power failure and not in a crash which Tesla said the doors would unlock in that case. What if the car is on fair and power shut down? How to I get the door open?
The front doors can be opened via the manual release.

Full info here: Model 3 Owner's Manual | Tesla

Screen Shot 2022-05-25 at 2.55.11 PM.png
 
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The exterior handles are electronic. Rear doors have no manual release inside either.
That really makes it a hazard as in the case reported in Vancouver that a M3 lost power and started burning. If the guy had kids strapped in car seat in the back seat, how could he get to the kid. Even if he had a window breaker and broke the window, he still had to crawl through the window and unstrap the kid. It would be a struggle to bring the kid and himself out through the window when the car was burning.
 
How would you reach in and open the door? If the door release worked then there would be no reason to break the window in the first place.
That's right. For MS and M3, the unlocking is motorized from inside and outside. Unless the design of Tesla is when power is cut, the doors will unlock. Some electronic latches are designed that way. Also, on a M3, there is no manual release of the door like the poorly designed pull the string to get out of a MS. Why on MS and not on M3 is beyond reasoning.
 

Resist

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Mar 24, 2019
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I know everyone makes this feel like it's a bigger concern than it really is. I say this because if it was that huge of an issue then you'd think the Feds would have required auto manufactures to come up with a better solution, yet they don't. We can "what if" the situation all day long and nothing will keep everyone completely safe. Because while I understand the concern, you could also worry about trying to save a driver bucked up with the doors locked, during an accident and it's on fire. How would anyone get them out in time to safe their life? I remember when power windows first came out, many were worried that if they drove into deep water awake or unconscious, that they wouldn't be able to get the windows down to get out if the power was knocked out.
 
I know everyone makes this feel like it's a bigger concern than it really is. I say this because if it was that huge of an issue then you'd think the Feds would have required auto manufactures to come up with a better solution, yet they don't. We can "what if" the situation all day long and nothing will keep everyone completely safe. Because while I understand the concern, you could also worry about trying to save a driver bucked up with the doors locked, during an accident and it's on fire. How would anyone get them out in time to safe their life? I remember when power windows first came out, many were worried that if they drove into deep water awake or unconscious, that they wouldn't be able to get the windows down to get out if the power was knocked out.
Unless you never carry kids strapped in the back seats, you will not be concerned. But some of us do and it is a true concern and not a crying wolf.
 
I know everyone makes this feel like it's a bigger concern than it really is. I say this because if it was that huge of an issue then you'd think the Feds would have required auto manufactures to come up with a better solution, yet they don't. We can "what if" the situation all day long and nothing will keep everyone completely safe. Because while I understand the concern, you could also worry about trying to save a driver bucked up with the doors locked, during an accident and it's on fire. How would anyone get them out in time to safe their life? I remember when power windows first came out, many were worried that if they drove into deep water awake or unconscious, that they wouldn't be able to get the windows down to get out if the power was knocked out.
You'd also think the feds would have kept Tesla from using a yoke...
 
so you watched the video of the model Y burning and didn’t think “hmmm what should I do if that happened with my child strapped into the back?”
There are lots of videos on the internet of horrible ways one could die and I go out of my way to not let myself be stressed about them. Or, more specifically, I take a few moments to run a quick estimation of statistical probability and realize the amount of stress endured trying to deliberately mitigate each metaphysically-possible outcome is a net net negative for both my health and happiness.

Also, more immediately, there is no part of me who thinks I couldn’t get through the back glass if I really needed to. I might shatter a few bones, but my kid is not going to die in a burning car while I am outside of said car…
 
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There are lots of videos on the internet of horrible ways one could die and I go out of my way to not let myself be stressed about them. Or, more specifically, I take a few moments to run a quick estimation of statistical probability and realize the amount of stress endured trying to deliberately mitigate each metaphysically-possible outcome is a net net negative for both my health and happiness.

Also, more immediately, there is no part of me who thinks I couldn’t get through the back glass if I really needed to. I might shatter a few bones, but my kid is not going to die in a burning car while I am outside of said car…
I guess I understand, if it was just a stat analysis, I too would file it somewhere around marginal or negligible at best along with most other parents. Qualitative look at the mode of failure makes me more concerned since the model 3 and Y share relevant platforms for how the door failed to open and why it just started on fire for seemingly no reason. Hopefully it’s a operator ignorance/failure situation or unique circumstance about the specific vehicle rather than broader risk with the way the systems and backups work (or didn’t work).

As to your final point, yes, I’m sure any adult could break the glass to get to their kid but I’d also wonder why the door didn’t just open? Just seems like a pretty understandable (and obvious?) concern.
 
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