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Are winter tires necessary with the long range dual motor AWD?

Are winter snow sires with AWD Model 3 needed?

  • I am comfortable with the stock tires handling in the snow.

    Votes: 33 22.9%
  • I am NOT comfortable with the stock tires handling in the snow.

    Votes: 12 8.3%
  • I have experience driving in snow with and without snow tires feel the snow tires are worth it.

    Votes: 87 60.4%
  • I have experience driving in snow with and without snow tires feel the snow tires NOT worth it.

    Votes: 12 8.3%

  • Total voters
    144

Jayhof

Member
Sep 1, 2019
13
28
STRATFORD
First off I live in Connecticut and was wondering if winter tires are really necessary. Does anyone know how the Model 3 with AWD handles in the snow with the stock tires?

I got a quote from one tire shop for federal Himalaya ws2 tires- 235/45r18 to have the tires mounted on my stock rims balanced with alignment for $600 out the door. That price sounds really good to me.

I also got a quote for the Michelin X ice X13 tires to be mounted on steel rims balanced with alignment for $1402.76

If I just have the Michelin X ice X13 tires to be mounted on my stock rims balanced with alignment for $1099.23 out the door.

I really don't want to spend a lot of money on winter tires and if it's not necessary I would prefer to go without winter tires as that is the primary reason I went with the AWD model 3.

Thank you in advance for your feedback.
 

ngogas

Active Member
Sep 19, 2018
1,725
1,193
Utah
You should try it and see what you think before buying. I’m pretty experience in the snow having lived in Utah all my life. I even had stock BMW rear wheel drive. So awd on this model 3 is a step up with stock. It’s really how a person feel comfortable and if they have experience.
 

Tes La Ferrari

Active Member
Jun 1, 2018
1,271
9,007
Canada
First off I live in Connecticut and was wondering if winter tires are really necessary. Does anyone know how the Model 3 with AWD handles in the snow with the stock tires?

I got a quote from one tire shop for federal Himalaya ws2 tires- 235/45r18 to have the tires mounted on my stock rims balanced with alignment for $600 out the door. That price sounds really good to me.

I also got a quote for the Michelin X ice X13 tires to be mounted on steel rims balanced with alignment for $1402.76

If I just have the Michelin X ice X13 tires to be mounted on my stock rims balanced with alignment for $1099.23 out the door.

I really don't want to spend a lot of money on winter tires and if it's not necessary I would prefer to go without winter tires as that is the primary reason I went with the AWD model 3.

Thank you in advance for your feedback.


Highly recommend them. They aren’t only for the snow - they are also for closer temperatures when it’s dry and raining and significantly improve stopping distances, braking and handling.

Very cheap insurance!
 

MrG_NY

Member
May 20, 2019
151
122
NY
Winter tires always are better than an all season tire. Drive the car in the first snow and see how it handles and how comfortable you are with it in the snow. The car should be alright in the snow with the awd and 50/50 weight distribution along with the low center of gravity.

Would I say snow tires are not worth it NO. I have had cars with and without winter tires (snow) and all season. The winter tires always did better in winter.
 
Last edited:
Winter tires came with my Volt. Really crappy using them. They were terrible in rain.

I am quite used to driving in winter conditions and am very comfortable driving with All Season or the stock tires that came with my M3. As I have not had a winter to use my tires, I can't say for certain. If you are in an area where the snow is more like slime and very grease like, I would think seriously about using Snow Tires, especially if you are not used to winter driving conditions.
From my readings, I hear the Blizzak WS90 is a great all around winter tire and IF I decide I need them, that is what I will purchase. Not cheap though.
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,969
3,660
Maine
Alot depends upon your local environment and your personal driving experience. I live in Maine and last year drove my LR-AWD with the OEM tires and they were fine, but the tires were new, since I got the car in December. I usually put on dedicated snows, but thought I'd get a baseline for performance first. This year I'll probably try the Michelin CrossClimate+ to get a sense of the latest rubber compounds. I have over 40 years of driving on snow and ice, so I'm used to marginal grip conditions. Here's a pic of the snow/ice my car had to climb last Winter:
IMG_1147.jpg
 

640k

Member
Jul 15, 2019
929
693
Cincinnati
OP, remember, snow tire != winter tire in all cases. there are winter performance tires that are formulated to be soft and responsive in the cooler temps than a standard all season. tires are utilitarian. if you buy a tire designed to do everything, it's only going to be mediocre in the most extremes.

summer tire = grippier in the heat
winter performance tire = grippier in the cold

for reference, me and three friends went out in a level 3 snow emergency. all in subarus. one of us had all-seasons. he was the only one to get stuck. all Subarus have AWD.

LxiFwOa.jpg
 

David L

Member
Jun 26, 2016
328
464
San Diego, CA
You may need to make sure you have XL tire for your Winter Tires on a Heavy EV car like the Model 3. The XL stands for eXtra Load and means the sidewalls of the tire are stronger and capable of handling heavy load requirements.

Actually, the XL designation means that the specified load index is achieved at 41psi instead of the regular 35psi. The weight rating is specified by the load index, such as 96 or 98.
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=55
https://www.discounttire.com/learn/load-range-load-index
 
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Reactions: afadeev

Msjulie

Active Member
Jun 26, 2016
2,519
1,981
Monterey Peninsula
I used to drive in Boston and nearby related snow and horror with an Audi A4 Quattro. AWD can get you moving but appropriate tires help you stop and turn.

Night and day difference between all season and snow tires; personally I would always opt for the season appropriate tires though I know many will poo-poo that as required...
 

afadeev

Member
Feb 28, 2019
904
1,120
NYC
First off I live in Connecticut and was wondering if winter tires are really necessary. Does anyone know how the Model 3 with AWD handles in the snow with the stock tires?

Like other said - "hell yes", but only if you intend to drive over snow and ice all winter long.
If your TM3 is a winter garage queen, or if you have another car shod with winter tires, or if you are comfortable hibernating in-doors all winter long without going out, then the answer becomes "maybe".

BTW, I just ordered a set of winter wheels and tires from TireRack.com for $1,968.80 installed and shipped with TPMS and Michelin X-Ice Xi3 winter tires:
https://www.tirerack.com/wheels/WheelCloseUpServlet?target=runWheelSearch&initialPartNumber=W19320001BMF&wheelMake=MSW&wheelModel=Type+30&wheelFinish=Machined+w/Black+Accent&autoMake=Tesla&autoModel=Model+3+Performance&autoYear=2019&autoModClar=
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Michelin&tireModel=X-Ice+Xi3&partnum=345HR8XI3XL


I got a quote from one tire shop for federal Himalaya ws2 tires- 235/45r18 to have the tires mounted on my stock rims balanced with alignment for $600 out the door. That price sounds really good to me.

Price is attractive, but I've never heard of General Himalaya tires, nor are they sold widely. I could not find any 3rd party comparison reviews on them either. You may choose to be our guinea pig and tell us how they work out.
Or just buy the best reviewed tires you can find from places like tirerack.com or directtire.com

Regardless of how you choose to proceed, consider two facts:
  1. Installing & balancing / removing / reinstalling and balancing summer<->winter tires on the same set of wheels twice a year gets old and expensive fast. You are better, off in the long term, to get a dedicated set of winter tires that you can swap in and out on your own.
  2. With tires, just like with condoms, you don't want to look for the cheapest possible rubbers - the consequence of a mistake can be expensive. Buy the best, and save money elsewhere.
a
 

GregD60

Member
Mar 24, 2016
376
375
Colorado
I found the stock 18" Michelin MXM4 tires to be particularly bad for an all season tire on snow and ice last winter. Most all season tires that I've driven are distinctly better in such conditions. My initial plan was to get through the first winter with the stock tires, but after the first snow storm driving the car with the MXM4 tires, I immediately went out and bought some winter tires. I'd be tempted to try something like the Michelin Cross Climate+; they sound pretty impressive from the various reports. Still, any all season tire is going to be a significant compromise; having separate summer and winter tires really is the best way to go.

One other note, performance winter tires give you 80% to 90% of the snow and ice traction of a studless winter tire, but they are dramatically better for steering response, and handling and braking in the dry and wet are significantly better. In my experience, a good all season tire in the snow and ice, which doesn't include the MXM4, gives you about half of the traction of dedicated winter tires.
 
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people who switch from ICE to EV have tendency to generalize that you need AWD & snow tires for the winter. My experience with EV began with used 2013 Nissan Leaf and I drove it in cold/snowy Colorado weather. I was so comfortable with that Leaf that I chose to drive it than Subaru Forester even on icy road. The instant torque makes it a good drive. One time people on Leaf Reddit were discussing about winter tires and I found the tire (Blacklion) that was on the Leaf has very poor rating. My 15 months young model 3 is RWD has all kind of winter driving features-why we've to worry a lot and waste more money.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: afadeev and Msjulie

Daniel in SD

Well-Known Member
Jan 25, 2018
7,407
10,946
San Diego
people who switch from ICE to EV have tendency to generalize that you need AWD & snow tires for the winter. My experience with EV began with used 2013 Nissan Leaf and I drove it in cold/snowy Colorado weather. I was so comfortable with that Leaf that I chose to drive it than Subaru Forester even on icy road. The instant torque makes it a good drive. One time people on Leaf Reddit were discussing about winter tires and I found the tire (Blacklion) that was on the Leaf has very poor rating. My 15 months young model 3 is RWD has all kind of winter driving features-why we've to worry a lot and waste more money.
How do EVs stop better than ICE vehicles in snowy conditions?
 

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