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At what point will Elon Musk face a margin call?

Discussion in 'TSLA Investor Discussions' started by valuationmatters, Feb 3, 2016.

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  1. valuationmatters

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    Does anyone know at what point (what stock price) Elon Musk would face a margin call? As folks may recall, EM borrowed a significant amount of money in order to buy shares of Tesla in the most recent common stock offering. I believe one of the risk factors is that EM may face a margin call and be forced to sell the stock in order to cover the margin call -- which would of course result in additional downward pressure on the stock.

    Any information would be appreciated.
     
  2. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    Shorts are welcome if they contribute in a meaningful manner. I can't see that you do so. Each new post is more ridiculous than the last.

    But to answer your question, probably a very very low SP, maybe something like $20.
     
  3. Eclectic

    Eclectic Member

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    I'll try to give a serious answer to the original question...a long time ago I worked on Wall Street and had to deal with margin issues quiet a bit. At the time, the way margin loans worked was you could borrow up to 50% of the value of the purchase and then you had to maintain the equity level at 35%. So if you bought $100,000 of stock, you had to first come up with $50k. If the stock then dropped to the point where your debt represented 65% or more of the then-current market value of the stock, you had to come up with more money or you'd have your stock sold to pay off the debt. In many cases, the margin requirements would be much higher than 35%. This would have been the case for thinly traded stocks, low priced stocks or stocks that were deemed excessively volatile. It was also something we imposed for insiders, if we'd even allow a margin loan on that kind of purchase. Sometimes the margin ratio would be 100% (meaning you couldn't have any debt against the stock).

    I don't know whether the Goldman loan was a margin loan or whether it was something else, but I wouldn't be surprised to find that the loan is secured by assets other than Tesla stock.
     
  4. aznt1217

    aznt1217 Active Member

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    Non-sophisticated (it's unsophisticated btw) musketeer here. I appreciate the insult. Even so, I'll help educate you. Typically a transaction of that size isn't handled with a normal trading account like us commoners use. There will be no margin call it's literally impossible. What's possible is a default and it's highly unlikely. Private placements aren't given out like candy from Goldman Sachs. These are secured loans for ultra high net worth individuals such as Elon Musk or whatever you'd like to call him. It's secured with all of his assets (I'm assuming you might think SpaceX is a farce to).

    I hope this is able to assist and answer your question. But hey, I know nothing about Corporate finance.
     
  5. AudubonB

    AudubonB Mild-mannered Moderator Lord Vetinari*

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    Moderator's note
    Close to three pages of posts have been moved to Snippiness; slight apologies for any babies that went down with the dirty dishwater. For the moment, the above posts have been let stand but as this moderator considers the question answered, there appears to be no reason to let this obviously contentious subject remain open for discussion so, until further notice, the thread is closed.
     
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