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Audi E-tron 55 sportback

OrthoSurg

Member
Jun 2, 2017
833
5,295
Montreal
Just got a text message from a work colleague who decided to purchase an Audi etron 55 sportback.
he has been buying Audis for the last 25 years, just bought 2 Audis for his sons. Always at the same dealership, always from the same salesman. I knew the fact that his associate had purchased a Performance Model 3 and was constantly talking about the instant torque of EVs would push him to the electric motortrain.

he asked me for my advice because I have been driving EVs for years but mainly Teslas and tried Nissan Leaf, BMW i3, Chevy Volt, but never had any experience with Audi etron.
has anyone tried it? Just read online the real world range is around 350km. Software is good? Regen?

thanks for the hints.
075C45C1-93A5-4EAC-B96C-A2A06EAA767B.jpeg
 

Brando

Active Member
Sep 27, 2016
2,882
2,007
Bainbridge Island, WA
He should compare to the gas version Audi - buy the one he prefers - OK if he doesn't buy Tesla - one more for the rest of us, right? Get him to compare all Audi gas & electric and Tesla then do a write up for us all. Can he write well? remind him to check panel gaps, if that concerns him. Charging IF he travels much, right?

 

mk677

Member
Feb 10, 2021
461
156
jacksonville fl
Just got a text message from a work colleague who decided to purchase an Audi etron 55 sportback.
he has been buying Audis for the last 25 years, just bought 2 Audis for his sons. Always at the same dealership, always from the same salesman. I knew the fact that his associate had purchased a Performance Model 3 and was constantly talking about the instant torque of EVs would push him to the electric motortrain.

he asked me for my advice because I have been driving EVs for years but mainly Teslas and tried Nissan Leaf, BMW i3, Chevy Volt, but never had any experience with Audi etron.
has anyone tried it? Just read online the real world range is around 350km. Software is good? Regen?

thanks for the hints.
I cannot comment on any aspect other than the regen, if the regen scheme is like the one found in the Taycan, which I am assuming that it is because of the commonality of the two vehicles, the regen is very unlike what you find in other EVs like the tesla or the leaf.
you cannot use one pedal driving because the regen is based on using the brake pedal.
without getting into the weeds, on the Taycan when you touch the brake pedal lightly you are not actually engaging the brakes, you are engaging the regen to slow the car, when you actually want to stop you increase the pressure on the brake pedal and then the brakes will bring the car to a complete stop.
just releasing the pressure on the accelerator causes the car to coast and there is no regen.
 

Doc Brown

Member
Oct 22, 2019
242
267
916
I cannot comment on any aspect other than the regen, if the regen scheme is like the one found in the Taycan, which I am assuming that it is because of the commonality of the two vehicles, the regen is very unlike what you find in other EVs like the tesla or the leaf.
you cannot use one pedal driving because the regen is based on using the brake pedal.
without getting into the weeds, on the Taycan when you touch the brake pedal lightly you are not actually engaging the brakes, you are engaging the regen to slow the car, when you actually want to stop you increase the pressure on the brake pedal and then the brakes will bring the car to a complete stop.
just releasing the pressure on the accelerator causes the car to coast and there is no regen.
The eTron has a paddle on the steering column that engages regen. when you let up on the accelerator you can tap the paddle once for light regen or twice for more.
 

cusetownusa

Member
Jan 29, 2020
522
869
Syracuse NY
The eTron has a paddle on the steering column that engages regen. when you let up on the accelerator you can tap the paddle once for light regen or twice for more.

interesting...that seems like a pain to do every time you let up on the accelerator. I haven't driven an EV yet but is seems like the way Tesla does it makes the most sense.
 

Doc Brown

Member
Oct 22, 2019
242
267
916
interesting...that seems like a pain to do every time you let up on the accelerator. I haven't driven an EV yet but is seems like the way Tesla does it makes the most sense.
Agree. Having it engage automatically would be better - much prefer the Tesla way in this regard. The location of the paddles is where my hands are most of the time - so it’s easy to do - just more difficult to remember to always do it. the "light brake" method works too . . .
 

Snow Drift

[Off-Road Assist] Activated
Feb 10, 2016
1,965
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Long Island
I cannot comment on any aspect other than the regen, if the regen scheme is like the one found in the Taycan, which I am assuming that it is because of the commonality of the two vehicles, the regen is very unlike what you find in other EVs like the tesla or the leaf.
you cannot use one pedal driving because the regen is based on using the brake pedal.
without getting into the weeds, on the Taycan when you touch the brake pedal lightly you are not actually engaging the brakes, you are engaging the regen to slow the car, when you actually want to stop you increase the pressure on the brake pedal and then the brakes will bring the car to a complete stop.
just releasing the pressure on the accelerator causes the car to coast and there is no regen.
This sounds like my PHEV. Lift off the accelerator and you coast. Press the brake pedal and it blends regen and friction brakes. I hate it. Coasting feels like a run-away train, very unsafe to not have immediate braking, and using two pedals is annoying.

One-pedal driving is the best part of driving an EV.
 

wws

Member
Aug 11, 2014
954
973
Northern California
This sounds like my PHEV. Lift off the accelerator and you coast. Press the brake pedal and it blends regen and friction brakes. I hate it. Coasting feels like a run-away train, very unsafe to not have immediate braking, and using two pedals is annoying.

One-pedal driving is the best part of driving an EV.

Chevy Volt and Bolt EV are like that. Regen is split between lifting off the Go pedal (moderate amount in "D" mode, heavier in "L" mode), then blended with more regen when you start pressing the brake pedal. On the Bolt EV, shifting to "L" mode also enables one pedal driving. Additionally, both Gen 2 Volt and Bolt EV have a "regen on demand" paddle on the back of the left side of the steering wheel. Press this with your fingertips and you'll get more regen - without having to move your foot over to the brake pedal. It usually works ok. Though one quirk is that sometimes when your foot is on the brake pedal, a bump in the road can cause regen to unexpectedly end - requiring a quick correction by pressing the pedal harder to engage the friction brakes. I think traction control is somehow involved in this quirk...

When I get back into the Volt after having driven the Tesla for a while, it takes a few minutes to relearn to use the Volts RoD paddle (it takes a little practice to smoothly incorporate it into ones driving style), and other quirks.
 

Snow Drift

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Feb 10, 2016
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Chevy Volt and Bolt EV are like that. Regen is split between lifting off the Go pedal (moderate amount in "D" mode, heavier in "L" mode), then blended with more regen when you start pressing the brake pedal. On the Bolt EV, shifting to "L" mode also enables one pedal driving. Additionally, both Gen 2 Volt and Bolt EV have a "regen on demand" paddle on the back of the left side of the steering wheel. Press this with your fingertips and you'll get more regen - without having to move your foot over to the brake pedal. It usually works ok. Though one quirk is that sometimes when your foot is on the brake pedal, a bump in the road can cause regen to unexpectedly end - requiring a quick correction by pressing the pedal harder to engage the friction brakes. I think traction control is somehow involved in this quirk...

When I get back into the Volt after having driven the Tesla for a while, it takes a few minutes to relearn to use the Volts RoD paddle (it takes a little practice to smoothly incorporate it into ones driving style), and other quirks.
Sounds horrible. Paddles, drivetrain modes and a brake pedal, plus thinking about when to use it...vs...modulate your right foot.

I prefer a manual transmission or Tesla's method for an automatic.
 

Needsdecaf

Active Member
Dec 16, 2018
1,135
1,412
The Woodlands, TX
I cannot comment on any aspect other than the regen, if the regen scheme is like the one found in the Taycan, which I am assuming that it is because of the commonality of the two vehicles, the regen is very unlike what you find in other EVs like the tesla or the leaf.
you cannot use one pedal driving because the regen is based on using the brake pedal.
without getting into the weeds, on the Taycan when you touch the brake pedal lightly you are not actually engaging the brakes, you are engaging the regen to slow the car, when you actually want to stop you increase the pressure on the brake pedal and then the brakes will bring the car to a complete stop.
just releasing the pressure on the accelerator causes the car to coast and there is no regen.

The Etron SUV / Sportback are not related to the Taycan. That's the ETron GT and the RS Etron GT.

I've driven a Taycan and didn't really see much of anything weird of not having one pedal driving. Even though I drive my Model 3 about 500 miles a week.
 

Doc Brown

Member
Oct 22, 2019
242
267
916
This sounds like my PHEV. Lift off the accelerator and you coast. Press the brake pedal and it blends regen and friction brakes. I hate it. Coasting feels like a run-away train, very unsafe to not have immediate braking, and using two pedals is annoying.

One-pedal driving is the best part of driving an EV.

Yeah . . . no. Coasting and having brakes is not "unsafe." In the event you need to stop quickly - you'll rely on brakes too. Just please don't forget how they work.
 
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wws

Member
Aug 11, 2014
954
973
Northern California
Sounds horrible. Paddles, drivetrain modes and a brake pedal, plus thinking about when to use it...vs...modulate your right foot.

I prefer a manual transmission or Tesla's method for an automatic.

Well Volts blended braking really isn't that bad coming from an ICE car. With the shifter in "D" it is much like a typical automatic car. And in "L" it is more like an ICE manual car where one downshifts for engine braking. No one says you have to use the paddle. But it is handy - and a lot faster than moving ones foot over to the brake pedal. Ultimately regen can max out at about 60 kW. Mainly when taking a freeway exit at speed and rapidly slowing down.

But then you have a car like the Taycan - which can max regen out at over 200 kW. (The I-Pace is pretty high too.) Compared to Teslas max of 70-80 kW, it would be quite startling if all 200+ kW of regen were available just on lifting the Go pedal. Moving some over to the brake pedal makes a lot of sense. Just a question of how much.
 

Snow Drift

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Feb 10, 2016
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Yeah . . . no. Coasting and having brakes is not "unsafe." In the event you need to stop quickly - you'll rely on brakes too. Just please don't forget how they work.
I don't want the car to coast. I can make it stay at a constant speed with my foot. If I am not accelerating or keeping the accelerator at a steady point, then I am trying to slow the car. OPD allows the perfect situation where reducing throttle input engages regen to slow the car. It is similar to engine braking with a manual transmission. Full control with just an adjustment in pressure on the accelerator pedal. It's the best part of driving an EV.

Having to engage another pedal every time is annoying. I only press the brake pedal in an emergency, or if regen is low due to a cold battery, or if I just don't have enough distance for regen to slow the car.
I don’t think he even knows what regenerative braking his.
lol
Assuming you mean me, I drove a Model 3 for 2.5 years and now have a Model Y. I am 100% aware of regenerative braking, and I prefer the way that Tesla allows you to control acceleration and braking via one pedal. I also drove manual for 19 years so I am aware of engine/motor braking without the friction brakes. There is no reason to ever lift your foot off the accelerator unless you are sitting at a light resting, or need to emergency apply the brake pedal. Just about all other situations allow you to stay on the accelerator, just at varying degrees of pedal travel.
Well Volts blended braking really isn't that bad coming from an ICE car. With the shifter in "D" it is much like a typical automatic car. And in "L" it is more like an ICE manual car where one downshifts for engine braking. No one says you have to use the paddle. But it is handy - and a lot faster than moving ones foot over to the brake pedal. Ultimately regen can max out at about 60 kW. Mainly when taking a freeway exit at speed and rapidly slowing down.

But then you have a car like the Taycan - which can max regen out at over 200 kW. (The I-Pace is pretty high too.) Compared to Teslas max of 70-80 kW, it would be quite startling if all 200+ kW of regen were available just on lifting the Go pedal. Moving some over to the brake pedal makes a lot of sense. Just a question of how much.
My PHEV has D and B (like L) modes. B allows some braking when you ease off the gas pedal, but not nearly as much as Tesla and it is really designed for slow driving downhill.

Why use a paddle when I can just reduce the amount of pressure on the accelerator and the car comfortably slows by the exact amount of stopping power necessary. As I said, I almost never lift off the accelerator while driving, unless really necessary (cold battery, stopping distance, emergency).
 
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OrthoSurg

Member
Jun 2, 2017
833
5,295
Montreal
Assuming you mean me, I drove a Model 3 for 2.5 years and now have a Model Y. I am 100% aware of regenerative braking, and I prefer the way that Tesla allows you to control acceleration and braking via one pedal. I also drove manual for 19 years so I am aware of engine/motor braking without the friction brakes. There is no reason to ever lift your foot off the accelerator unless you are sitting at a light resting, or need to emergency apply the brake pedal. Just about all other situations allow you to stay on the accelerator, just at varying degrees of pedal travel.
No, I wasnt talking about you not kowing about regen braking, I was talking about the guy interested in purchasing the Audi E-Tron Sportback
 
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Snow Drift

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So I took a Blue ID.4 1st edition (RWD) out today.

D mode drove fine, like any automatic allowing coasting and creeping, and always requiring the brake pedal to induce regen slowing/friction brakes.

B mode, my preference, provided some regenerative braking torque by just reducing pressure on the accelerator (but no where near as much regen as Tesla). I would say it is similar to when a Tesla battery is cold, and the car reduces regen, and you get about 30% normal regen braking force and are required to use the friction brakes)...but again, even in B mode, you will get MORE regen when also using the brake pedal.

I like Tesla's application of all torque on the accelerator. So, that is my biggest negative and why I personally wouldn't buy a VAG EV (until they fix this).

Overall, very nice car, drove very well. 0-60 was fine to feel confident in most situations, obviously this is not a performance car and no where near as quick as our Teslas, but it isn't trying to be.
 

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