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Autopilot regulations

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by Travis, May 25, 2015.

  1. Travis

    Travis Member

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    When the autopilot feature (lane control) is released will it be subject to state by state regulations? Meaning, will it be released to all cars or does each state need to pass regulation before it can be released in that state? I live in Georgia and I know our legislature was looking into allowing autonomous driving but I don't know if autopilot would require legislation.


    Also, does anyone have any information on a time frame when it might come out?
     
  2. brucet999

    brucet999 Active Member

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    Elon made it clear that they call it "Autopilot" because it is not autonomous driving, making the analogy to aircraft where the pilot pays attention and takes over when necessary. The only autonomous driving Tesla has talked about is the car driving itself from the garage to your door on private property only.
     
  3. Candleflame

    Candleflame Member

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    hasn't the uk greenlit autonomous cars for testing purposes last year or smth?
     
  4. Travis

    Travis Member

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    Yes, I get this difference between autopilot and autonomous, but I still can't find any information on regulation. I know that four states are allowing the Google car to operate as long as a driver is present. Does this mean that he can't release the lane control feature until a state has approved it? Just trying to figure out the roll out of the update and how it is going to work.
     
  5. rickgt

    rickgt Enthusiast owner/member

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    Not sure there is a regulation issue... these are not autonomous vehicles... don't need special laws when cruise control is in use, or when Adaptive, or TACC, versions of cruise are used... many cars are using autopilot like features to provide cruise and blind spot warnings already...

    Driver is still driving the car. just not providing minute adjustments to speed, and now lane holding. Always aware, and always should override in proper situations.
     
  6. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Active Member

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    Right, the law might say "keep your mind on your and driving and your hands on the wheel", but given that all states allow cruise control I don't see why lane keep would be a problem.
     
  7. Joel

    Joel Active Member

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    Only four states (Michigan, California, Nevada, and Florida) allow autonomous driving vehicles on the road. The short answer to your question is: states define the various technologies and use. For the foreseeable future, the driver will be responsible for "monitoring, operating, or overseeing an vehicle with 'automated' technology." In layman's terms, the future of autonomous driving vehicles is there will be more and more technology available for the car to "drive itself," however the operator must be in the driver seat with at least one hand on the wheel and alert whenever the automated technology is in use.

    Here is how Michigan defines "automated technology" and other terms:

    (1) “Automated motor vehicle” means a motor vehicle on which automated technology has been installed, either by a manufacturer of automated technology or an upfitter that enables the motor vehicle to be operated without any control or monitoring by a human operator. Automated motor vehicle does not include a motor vehicle enabled with 1 or more active safety systems or operator assistance systems, including, but not limited to, a system to provide electronic blind spot assistance, crash avoidance, emergency braking, parking assistance, adaptive cruise control, lane‑keeping assistance, lane departure warning, or traffic jam and queuing assistance, unless 1 or more of these technologies alone or in combination with other systems enable the vehicle on which the technology is installed to operate without any control or monitoring by an operator.
    (2) “Automated technology” means technology installed on a motor vehicle that has the capability to assist, make
    decisions for, or replace an operator.
    (3) “Automatic mode” means the mode of operating an automated motor vehicle when automated technology is
    engaged to enable the motor vehicle to operate without any control or monitoring by an operator.
    (4) “Manufacturer of automated technology” means a manufacturer or subcomponent system producer recognized
    by the secretary of state that develops or produces automated technology or automated vehicles.
    (5) “Upfitter” means a person that modifies a motor vehicle after it was manufactured by installing automated
    technology in that motor vehicle to convert it to an automated vehicle. Upfitter includes a subcomponent system
    producer recognized by the secretary of state that develops or produces automated technology.
    Sec. 35a. “Operate” or “operating” means 1 or more of the following:
    (a) Being in actual physical control of a vehicle. This subdivision applies regardless of whether or not the person is
    licensed under this act as an operator or chauffeur.
    (b) Causing an automated motor vehicle to move under its own power in automatic mode upon a highway or street
    regardless of whether the person is physically present in that automated motor vehicle at that time. This subdivision
    applies regardless of whether the person is licensed under this act as an operator or chauffeur. As used in this subdivision,
    “causing an automated motor vehicle to move under its own power in automatic mode” includes engaging the automated
    technology of that automated motor vehicle for that purpose.
    Sec. 36. “Operator” means a person, other than a chauffeur, who does either of the following:
    (a) Operates a motor vehicle upon a highway or street.
    (b) Operates an automated motor vehicle upon a highway or street.

    Below are the other Statutes by State:

    Michigan: http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2013-2014/publicact/pdf/2013-PA-0251.pdf

    Florida: http://www.flsenate.gov/Session/Bill/2012/1207/BillText/er/PDF

    Nevada: http://www.leg.state.nv.us/Session/76th2011/Bills/AB/AB511_EN.pdf

    California: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12/bill/sen/sb_1251-1300/sb_1298_bill_20120925_chaptered.pdf
     
  8. donv

    donv Member

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    Not an issue. Mercedes, Lexus, and others all sell cars with similar features today. It's really just an enhanced cruise control.

    The only regulation I'm aware of is that in New York, you are required to keep a hand on the wheel.

    As for when? With Tesla, who knows.

     

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