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Battery charging rates w/ made in china

Peteski

Active Member
Oct 2, 2017
3,539
2,403
UK, Milton Keynes
OTOH, as long as you aren't relying on that bottom 5% of your battery, none of this really matters... Over 7 years a couple of extra KWh are nice padding to help you stay out of the top and bottom 10%, but don't really make a difference day to day.

On my P-, unless I'm aiming for somewhere,
  • with destination charging,
  • that is between 270 and 300 miles away, and
  • I pre-dehydrate myself to be able to do it without a stop,
it just doesn't matter. If you are going less distance then you will make it any way. If you are going more you have to charge anyway. The situations it will matter for are really really marginal (unless your commute happens to be in that range, then I'm on your side!). If you are stopping for a charge, adding an extra 2% makes no real difference. If you are planning to go into the last 5% anyway, then that is going to be a pretty tense drive and once you have done it a couple of times you'll stop for a wee topup!

Don't get me wrong - its all interesting - but it makes waaaay less difference than the heatpump. I really would welcome the more consistent performance through the cold weather

I totally agree. I’ll probably never even know what battery spec I have. It will be very interesting to see how the heat pump performs. So far it’s been great in terms of heating, but I have no idea on efficiency yet as only driving locally for food shop.
 

Turntable666

Member
Jan 3, 2021
33
10
England
All very interesting and in the main I agree with your summery , however from my POV the effects of degradation concern me as I intend to keep my M3LR for 12 to 15 years, I would rather have a bigger capacity battery and even if it’s software Locked not see that deg at all as this will to my understanding disappear from the top of the battery which I will never see...
 

Peteski

Active Member
Oct 2, 2017
3,539
2,403
UK, Milton Keynes
All very interesting and in the main I agree with your summery , however from my POV the effects of degradation concern me as I intend to keep my M3LR for 12 to 15 years, I would rather have a bigger capacity battery and even if it’s software Locked not see that deg at all as this will to my understanding disappear from the top of the battery which I will never see...

If you are keeping it for that long, by far the biggest influence on battery health will be your charging regime. Particularly use of Superchargers.
 
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Llama.

Lurking somewhere up North.
Jan 25, 2021
251
136
Who knows?
Yes, range and longevity are really important for me too.

I’m mostly concerned about the reports of charging speed limited to 50-80 KWh at Superchargers for LFP battery cars. That would be a real disappointment.

I’ve ordered a LR M3 AWD and been matched to a car en route from China .

Tesla say they can’t confirm details of battery chemistry.

I understand I’ll have to read the battery code on the delivery note in the glovebox on collection?
 

Turntable666

Member
Jan 3, 2021
33
10
England
Please do have a look and report back once you get the car. there is a lot of interest in weather the uk will be getting the LG or Panasonic battery for the M3LR model.
Yes, range and longevity are really important for me too.

I’m mostly concerned about the reports of charging speed limited to 50-80 KWh at Superchargers for LFP battery cars. That would be a real disappointment.

I’ve ordered a LR M3 AWD and been matched to a car en route from China .

Tesla say they can’t confirm details of battery chemistry.

I understand I’ll have to read the battery code on the delivery note in the glovebox on collection?
 

Terinante

Member
Feb 6, 2021
56
35
UK
Yes, range and longevity are really important for me too.

I’m mostly concerned about the reports of charging speed limited to 50-80 KWh at Superchargers for LFP battery cars. That would be a real disappointment.

I’ve ordered a LR M3 AWD and been matched to a car en route from China .

Tesla say they can’t confirm details of battery chemistry.

I understand I’ll have to read the battery code on the delivery note in the glovebox on collection?
Have you had your collection date yet? Will be interesting to see what battery it is when you collect.
 

henderrj

Active Member
Jun 16, 2014
1,033
882
Graham, WA, United States
Don't know if this will help UK model 3 purchasers, but I have a US 2014 85. I currently have 230,000 mi on it. Still the original battery. I think considering I have older chemistry, older design, no heat pump, you probably don't have much to worry about. if you don't get a half a million miles out of either battery I'll be surprised.

And, by the way, it's been supercharged many thousands of times. Often to 100%, like at least a couple times a week. I love the car, but it's pretty well used!
 

M3PBOSS

Member
Jan 1, 2021
65
68
London
Don't know if this will help UK model 3 purchasers, but I have a US 2014 85. I currently have 230,000 mi on it. Still the original battery. I think considering I have older chemistry, older design, no heat pump, you probably don't have much to worry about. if you don't get a half a million miles out of either battery I'll be surprised.

And, by the way, it's been supercharged many thousands of times. Often to 100%, like at least a couple times a week. I love the car, but it's pretty well used!
Whats your battery degradation ?
 

Adopado

Active Member
Aug 19, 2019
4,533
3,422
Scotland
I'm collecting my M3 LR on March 4th. All this speculation about battery performance is making me a little nervous tbh

It's an unfortunate, if understandable, obsession on the forum. But your car will be fantastic! Take the quoted range and charge rate stats with a pinch of salt ... the important thing is that the car will get you where you want to go for years to come. Charge rates change with your state of charge, the weather, the latest software update .. and obviously, the battery chemistry. The peak speeds that are quoted are never maintained throughout the charge period by any EV ... it's a "curve". The problem many of us have when Supercharging is that it's too fast to finish your lunch before having to move the car (i.e. a nice problem to have)! The other thing to bear in mind is that the battery performance goes up and down ... when I got my car it had a max DC charge rate of 100kW ... now it's 170kW due to a free software update. You may think that's fantastic (and yes, it's a nice feeling) but in day to day use you may be surprised to learn that it's not really a big deal for me. If you are fortunate enough to have home charging then you may even find that Supercharging is a rare event unless you spend your days zipping up and down motorways.
 

md337

Member
Feb 12, 2021
12
7
London
I understand I’ll have to read the battery code on the delivery note in the glovebox on collection?

Yes - this is my understanding too. Plus the LFP batteries don't have the 80% stop limit recommendation when charging, it's immediately visible in the charging screen menu. It goes to 100% by default so you can immediately tell it's a different chem. At least this is what I see from videos of users in China and Germany.

I'm picking up my LR M3 on 2nd of March and I will update this thread. Meanwhile the Sales Rep said it's LFP, but not fully convinced by his statement. I raised a support ticket with Tesla based on my VIN and Reservation Number and asked what the battery type technology is. They said they requested this information from the factory and will revert via email - as soon as I've got an update I will share it with you.
 

Llama.

Lurking somewhere up North.
Jan 25, 2021
251
136
Who knows?
Yes - this is my understanding too. Plus the LFP batteries don't have the 80% stop limit recommendation when charging, it's immediately visible in the charging screen menu. It goes to 100% by default so you can immediately tell it's a different chem. At least this is what I see from videos of users in China and Germany.

I'm picking up my LR M3 on 2nd of March and I will update this thread. Meanwhile the Sales Rep said it's LFP, but not fully convinced by his statement. I raised a support ticket with Tesla based on my VIN and Reservation Number and asked what the battery type technology is. They said they requested this information from the factory and will revert via email - as soon as I've got an update I will share it with you.
Fab! Thanks
 

henderrj

Active Member
Jun 16, 2014
1,033
882
Graham, WA, United States
Whats your battery degradation ?
Don't know if this will help UK model 3 purchasers, but I have a US 2014 85. I currently have 230,000 mi on it. Still the original battery. I think considering I have older chemistry, older design, no heat pump, you probably don't have much to worry about. if you don't get a half a million miles out of either battery I'll be surprised.

And, by the way, it's been supercharged many thousands of times. Often to 100%, like at least a couple times a week. I love the car, but it's pretty well used!

Short answer 238 mi. But then again :)

In one of the updates Tesla slowed the charge rate for the last 5% to the point where it's pretty much unusable. The only time I get to 100% is if I start the charging many hours before I need to go. Seriously the last 5% can take 2 hours to complete. They've also now slowed the charge rate on superchargers so that it rarely if ever sees 100 kw, and normally settles in around 60 to 65, until the last 20% where it slows most noticeably.

Environmental conditions may play a role in the battery life. I live in the Pacific Northwest in the US where the temperature rarely goes below freezing very far and almost never above 80. The only time this car has seen any temperatures beyond that is when we travel. You don't often travel to extremely hot places or extremely cold places when you're on vacation! We owned it since it had 38,000 mi so most of those miles are ours. It had its early life in Phoenix Arizona, so clearly saw some pretty extreme temperatures on the high end!

Curiously it was a car that was self-insured. The guy wrecked it, fixable, but he didn't want to deal with it. And then it sat for 2 years before it was finally sold. Sean, now of Ohmmu Batteries, fixed it pretty much completely, I finished the job. Don't know if that sitting for two years unused had anything to do with the battery longevity.

I would certainly be curious about usage style if I were you. I bought the car to test a charging system that I now have a patent on. (My avatar is one of the drawings from the patent application.) Although I still haven't sold it, during that time when I poured all of our money including our life savings into that patent my son drove the car Uber for 100,000+ of those miles. He's the one who charged it most regularly at superchargers and charged it to 100% most of the time. Although we don't do Uber anymore it still gets a pretty fair amount of Miles every month, I do drive a lot! And still supercharged at least once a week. Most of the home charging was done with the dual chargers, that is to say 19.2 kw. I have a 100 amp breaker on my Tesla Gen 2 charger.

Sorry for the long post. Hopefully it's helpful to someone.
 

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OOvOO

Member
Jan 26, 2020
84
25
Manchester
I’m a TESLA owner and have Model 3 for 1.5 years. Also I’m a Chinese who have spend 20 years in Manchester. So I’m much more close to Chinese media and in their Tesla user we chat group which have few thousands user their. All Tesla are imported from the USA before Shanghai factory set up. People saying over all build quality from Shanghai are better than USA made. And they are improving as well.
Batterie, there is a way to see which battery on your car, but not sure about labels for Europe/UK. They had Panasonic and LG. Now are more or less from CATL and it’s LiFePO4. I wouldn’t worry too much about the battery as Tesla will have 4 years warranties. From what I’ve learned, all batteries are not cold friendly.
 
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Adopado

Active Member
Aug 19, 2019
4,533
3,422
Scotland
I’m a TESLA owner and have Model 3 for 1.5 years. Also I’m a Chinese who have spend 20 years in Manchester. So I’m much more close to Chinese media and in their Tesla user we chat group which have few thousands user their. All Tesla are imported from the USA before Shanghai factory set up. People saying over all build quality from Shanghai are better than USA made. And they are improving as well.
Batterie, there is a way to see which battery on your car, but not sure about labels for Europe/UK. They had Panasonic and LG. Now are more or less from CATL and it’s LiFePO4. I wouldn’t worry too much about the battery as Tesla will have 4 years warranties. From what I’ve learned, all batteries are not cold friendly.
The battery and drive train warranty is 8 years or 100,000 to 120,000 miles on model 3 (100000 in sr+ 120000 LR or P) or 150000 on SX I think.
 

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