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Battery range with AC on

I’m looking to get a into model 3 performance but I have some question. I drive every day 120 to 150 miles a day 5 days a week. living in Phoenix AZ I’m wondering if I’ll have enough range with the AC on. Also charging it almost from a dead battery every day is that going to when the battery faster?
 

RayK

Safety Score 90 (Was 96!)
Apr 5, 2016
3,081
3,182
San Jose, CA
Not quite Phoenix weather here but on a trip to Oregon two weeks ago, I ran the A/C all of the time going up and down I-5. Temps were just below and just above 100. My total mileage (San Jose to Ashland and around town up there) was 868 miles and my average energy was 261 Wh/mi. Average speed on the interstate was 5 mph above the limit. My lifetime is 235 Wh/mi. I don't expect your energy usage to be any more than 5% extra between running the A/C and not.

As far as the battery wear is concerned, if you are charging at L2 rates (240V), it's not going to matter much IMO. Supercharging, however, will not be good.
 
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Tam

Well-Known Member
Nov 25, 2012
11,862
10,887
Visalia, CA
I’m looking to get a into model 3 performance but I have some question. I drive every day 120 to 150 miles a day 5 days a week. living in Phoenix AZ I’m wondering if I’ll have enough range with the AC on. Also charging it almost from a dead battery every day is that going to when the battery faster?

It's rated for 315 EPA miles so that should easily cover 150 miles a day with the A/C on.

Your battery lasts longer if you don't discharge it deeply.

That means if I charge to 90% and I drive 40% a day, I should plug in every day and not wait 2 days to drain to 10% to plug it in.

However, despite abuses, your battery should still be good when it will run out of the warranty at 8 years/100,000 miles whichever first.
 
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Being in Phoenix, you should definitely invest in heat rejection film/ceramic tint.

I used to regularly drive from LA to Scottsdale, and wished I had gotten my car tinted.

As to your original question, you'll be fine, as long as you can charge it at home every night. I managed to survive either charging from the range, or dryer outlets.
 
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smatthew

Active Member
Jun 9, 2018
1,537
2,576
CA Bay Area
Heat rejection film is not a thing. The heat enters the cabin via convection not radiation.
So when the sun shines through the window and heats up the seats, or me, that's convection? Wow, I'm a science teacher and didn't realize I had been teaching convection and radiation all wrong.......
 
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Just precondition the car before you get in it. I do before I leave work in Florida and my car goes from 150+ inside the car to 72 in 10 mins or so. The fans kick to high under 72 at least for my car. So if you can run the AC around 72 then it'll conserve some energy.

Doing so you'll get in a colder car, you yourself should feel comfortable quicker and be able to run the AC at a higher temp. Ceramic tint goes a long way too.
 
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For any new Model 3, 150 miles in 100F weather using the AC should be doable at reasonable highway speeds without having to charge to 100% or run down to 1%. "Reasonable" meaning not speed demon, but also not sitting in traffic jams where running the AC while stopped can consume significant amounts of energy while you wait.

If you consume 50% of the rated range daily, then you can set the charge limit to 75% and still have 25% remaining when you get home. Even if you consume 80% of the rated range daily, then you can set the charge limit to 90% and still have 10% remaining when you get home. So you should be able to avoid having to charge to 100% or run down to 1%, if you are trying to reduce battery life issues or risk of running out.
 
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