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Battery software update for Model S 60D

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by Sterler, Jun 5, 2017.

  1. Sterler

    Sterler New Member

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    Jun 5, 2017
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    Location:
    Cazadero, Ca 95421
    I received my Model S 60D in September 2016.
    I understand the Battery software update for Model S 60D will make it like a 75D - is that correct?
    If this is correct, does that mean a 75D battery was installed at manufacture even though I only payed for a 60D?
     
  2. azred

    azred Member

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    Yes and you are saving $4500 plus tax since cost at purchase was $6500. Lucky you... And me.
     
  3. Sterler

    Sterler New Member

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    Jun 5, 2017
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    Cazadero, Ca 95421
    So, if I do not get the software update which Tesla wants to charge me $1500 - can I not just set my charging to 100% - it is now set at the default which I think is 90% ?
     
  4. gabeincal

    gabeincal Enjoying Napa life the electric way

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    Location:
    Napa, CA, USA
    Correct. You'll never be able to get to 100%, therefore balance your battery (unless you ask at a service center). I purchased the upgrade and I think it is worth the 1.5k or 2k depending on model.

    Edit: You can set your charge level to 100% which will be 100% of the 60 battery limit. NOT the 75.
     
  5. Rocky_H

    Rocky_H Active Member

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    Boise, ID
    Right, the reason for that is for simplification of production. They can offer a product at three different priced versions, while really only having to deal with manufacturing, stocking, inventory control, part number, etc. for two actual batteries. On a smaller scale manufacturing like Tesla still has, that overhead savings can be significant versus the extra battery cells they are giving away. With the scale of the Model 3, though, they will be building in such large volumes that they probably will not do that software locked battery thing anymore, because it would be way too many battery cells to give away, which would cost too much real money.

    Computer companies have been doing this type of thing for a while, where they may have a processor that has multiple cores, but they may sell it in a few cheaper price points with some number of the cores locked, just because it's cheaper to build that one kind of chip than having to maintain multiple designs.
     

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