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battery voltage tesla model s

Discussion in 'Battery Discussion' started by wassenberg, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. wassenberg

    wassenberg Member

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    Does anyone know what is the voltage of the battery pack in the model s ?

    I think also with the connector using for supercharching you have direct acces to the battery, can anybody tell me if i am correct ?
     
  2. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    What would you do with this information?

    I'm reminded of the tag "No user serviceable parts inside"....
     
  3. efusco

    efusco Moderator - Model S & X forums

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    purely informational I assume, I'd like to know too. Just like I like to know the kWh capacity, the amperage, the torque, HP and other factors that are essentially useless to the end user unless you'll be doing work on the car of some sort. But still good to know for comparison to other products and such.
     
  4. arg

    arg Member

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    Exact nominal voltage not known, but one example 365V when half-charged.

    Mostly incorrect. The battery only becomes connected to the connector terminals once the external equipment (supercharger) has communicated with the on-board software to negotiate supercharging parameters. The protocol is believed to be a power-line-carrier one, but details are not currently public.
     
  5. wassenberg

    wassenberg Member

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    what i want to do with this information i tell you guys,

    i am thinking of charching on solar during the day and use offcourse this energy for my home during the day. In the evening hours when there is no solar it might be possible to use the battery storage energy for my house ... (it is all theory, but it is worth over-thinking, the biggist problem now is the storage of the energy if you want to cut off the power from the supplyer)
     
  6. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    That particular use case has been discussed and deemed a terrible use of the batteries, even if it could be done. The battery pack and batteries aren't designed for that.
     
  7. cinergi

    cinergi Active Member

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    It also voids your warranty.
     
  8. ggr

    ggr Roadster R80 537, SigS P85 29

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    And it's fattening.
     
  9. SoularEnergy

    SoularEnergy Member

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    Why has it been deemed a terrible use of the battery?

    During the test drive, I stomp on the pedal and the battery is discharging at a rate of 320 kW. A house will draw a maximum of 48 kW (200 A panel, at full capacity), and that is highly highly unlikely. In the event of a grid-outage, a battery backup house would need to run off of a sub panel, with critical loads. IE, lights, refrigerator, a few outlets etc. This shouldn't even reach 10 kW.

    So at such a low power draw, I don't see how it could harm the battery. A fully charged 85 kWh battery pack could provide enough energy for the average American home for 3 full days. That's a slow discharge rate, and doesn't even take into account any inputs from a solar electric system.

    I understand Tesla wanting to put a warranty claim in there - who know what the DIYers are possible of doing. But if done correctly, it can be a great value add benefit for the owner.

    After all, the Leaf can do it: Nissan Leaf can power your house for a day or two | ExtremeTech
     
  10. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

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    Your point seems to be that small loads wouldn't harm the pack. While true, the Roadster owners found out that overall capacity loss is closely related to mileage (=pack usage). Check here: Roadster Owner Based Study of Battery Pack Capacity Over Time - Page 12.

    Conclusion: Using your precious Tesla pack as a stationary power source is a waste of money. There are cheaper emergency power sources, e.g. gen sets. While the car 'is there already' this doesn't complete a backup power system. You need lines, switches, meters, control logic.

    A "spent" traction battery pack (e.g. capacity degraded to 60% & warranty expired after 8 years) probably is well suited as a power source for stationary application. Check here: Batteries to Power the Grid
    Or check this stationary battery storage solution: Solar Power and Battery Backup: Tesla and SolarCity's Dream Home
     
  11. SoularEnergy

    SoularEnergy Member

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    I agree that a "spent" battery pack may be more ideally suited for emergency backup usage.

    However, I still do not agree that using the battery for backup (especially when paired with a solar PV system) is measurably detrimental to its life. After all, we're talking "emergency" usage during grid outages. This is what, <1% of the year? Meaning you fully discharge the pack maybe once a year for outage support?

    I think Tesla, as innovators, should make this possible. As Nissan already has.
     
  12. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    ... Read the article you linked. It explains why the car shouldn't be used as whole house backup (has to do with fully discharging the battery).
    Let me know where you can get one of those in the US and the price. You just linked to an article for a prototype in Japan.

    Here's the latest article I could find re: such a device: Nissan Leaf-To-Home Power Station: Will It Make It To U.S.?

    I think it would be great if the HPWC could double as a whole house backup system. I don't know if I'd pay a lot more for that though.
     
  13. clea

    clea Member

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    #13 clea, Nov 27, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012
    I remember reading an article about some people in NJ that had used an unofficial (non Nissan) version of the V2H setup for their Leafs during Sandy but I cannot find it right now ...

    EDIT: found one short mention of it here EV Power Helping Keep Homes Lit in Wake of Sandy | AutoGuide.com News it is not what i remember reading but ...
     
  14. Babylonfive

    Babylonfive Power12

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    I'd also point out that if such an emergency use were available, it wouldn't require FULLY discharging the battery. It could have great value in providing backup from capacility down to 5 or 10%, and not have any aggravating effect on life (other than the obvious normal wear effect of a single battery discharge).

    It's been said before: TESLA wants only their electronics to be in charge of charging and discharging, and that makes sense to me - obviously that limitation would block this kind of use. Hence, Cinergi's warantee comment.
     

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