TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Best 19 tires replacement

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by No2DinosaurFuel, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. No2DinosaurFuel

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Messages:
    780
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    #1 No2DinosaurFuel, Sep 8, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2016
    i have the 19 inch rim and tire rack recommends
    Cinturato P7 All Season Plus

    Anyone has experience with this one. Ideally I want a tire that I won't have to replace for a while. This one is rated at 70,000 miles. I know it won't last that long but the next best is around 50,000.

    Also what about ride noise and comfort? I have no other reference other than the OEM GoodYear tires.

    Thanks!

    Forgot to mention, I am looking for comfort and noise with decent wet/snow tractions. Wear is also a priority, but not as important as the others.
     
  2. SomeJoe7777

    SomeJoe7777 Marginally-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2015
    Messages:
    534
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    The Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus is a great tire, but some people have posted here that it does have some traction issues with the Tesla (specifically on launches). In addition, it is not a low-rolling resistance tire, which can increase energy usage by 10% over the OEM tires.

    I'm assuming you want an all-season tire such that you only run one set of tires all year, and as you said, it needs to have wet and light snow traction.

    With those parameters, I'd look at 5 different tires.

    These first 3 tires are Grand Touring category, which are tuned for smooth, comfortable ride and low noise.

    1. Pirelli Citurato P7 All Season Plus - Highly rated, meets almost all of your requirements. Can lose a bit of traction on launches, is not low rolling resistance. Rated for 70K miles, but you will get less.
    2. Michelin Primacy MXM4 - One of the OEM tires from Tesla. Excellent all-around tire, low rolling resistance. Not as good with snow traction. Rated for 50K miles, you will get less.
    3. Good Year Eagle Touring / T0-Tesla - The newest OEM tire from Tesla. Low rolling resistance and has the noise-reduction foam inside. Probably not as good with snow traction as the Pirelli. Rated for 50K miles, tire is too new to know whether that will hold up.

    Note that while these all-season tires can cope with light snow, none of them will be anywhere near a dedicated winter tire. If you are actually going to be driving in snow, you should consider a 2nd set of winter tires.


    The other 2 tires are Ultra-High Performance All-Season category, which are tuned for handling and traction at the expense of a bit higher noise and not as smooth of a ride.

    4. Continental Extreme Contact DWS06 - Meets or exceeds the Pirelli in performance, good snow traction for an all-season tire. Not low rolling resistance. Rated for 55K miles, you will probably get less.
    5. Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ - Best performing tire here, best traction and handling. Rated 50K miles and may actually do it. Not low rolling resistance.


    Energy use is important to me, so my choice for an all-season would be either the Primacy or the Eagle. If energy use was no issue, I'd probably go with the Pilot Sport.
     
    • Informative x 3
  3. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    12,763
    Location:
    Texas
    One that SomeJoe left out was the Nokian WR-g3. This tire is a severe service all-season and really does have very good winter traction. UTQG 500 A A
     
  4. verdee

    verdee Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2015
    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    I just had continental DWS 06 tires installed today. So far very quiet otherwise seem good. They compare to the AS3s with better cold weather/snow traction per tire rack
     
  5. No2DinosaurFuel

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Messages:
    780
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    Energy usage is a factor. I thought the perreli are low resistance? Ill look into it more. I am not launching that much. It is a just 90D after all.

    Thanks for all the inputs.

    Here are my priority in the order of importance high to low if anyone else care to have their inputs.

    1. Range
    2. Ride noise
    3. Ride comfort
    4. Traction in wet/snow
    5. Tire wear.
    6. Vehicle performance like launch

    The reason I am looking for a tire that does it all is I don't live in snowy area but I would like to be ready when I need it without having to replace tires. Hence all-season.

    Right now base on the response it looks like the Good year Eagle is still the best.
     
  6. SomeJoe7777

    SomeJoe7777 Marginally-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2015
    Messages:
    534
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Actually, you're correct, the Pirelli Cinturatos are indeed low rolling resistance (Pirelli calls it "EcoImpact").

    Based on your list above and given that you have an AWD vehicle, the Pirelli may indeed be the best choice for you.


    I did not mention the Nokian WR-G3 in my earlier post, but indeed those are great tires. They are not really an all-season tire though, they're what Nokian is calling an "all-weather" tire. It's basically a winter tire that can handle all-year temperatures, so you can leave them on the car throughout the year if you want. But they're designed for winter use -- wet, snow and ice traction in cold temperatures. Normal all-season tires will perform better in moderate or hot temperatures.

    I have a set of the Nokian WR-G3's that I use for my winter tires. But I pull them off and run Michelin Primacy MXM4s or Michelin Pilot Super Sports in the summer.
     
  7. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    12,763
    Location:
    Texas
    This is what I do too. A winter tire like R2 or X-Ice doesn't work well in Texas as there are too many warm days.
     
  8. cab

    cab Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    Grapevine, TX
    As an aside, we've had the Continental DWS06es on my wife's Volvo XC60 for a year or so now. Previously, I've had the earlier DWSes on cars. The 06 series seem to handle better than the older DWS. They appear to accomplish this with a stiffer sidewall so ride comfort does suffer a tad in comparison. I also think they have a bit of a hollow/high pitched sound over impacts. A year later though and I would probably make the same choice for THAT car. It has better noise blocking that the S which really suffers (IMO) on anything other than blacktop compared to most cars I've owned...at least with the 21" PS2s I have on their now.
     
  9. ColBatGuano

    ColBatGuano Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2016
    Messages:
    74
    Location:
    Texas
    I have a July delivery 90D that I drove for 5,000+ miles with the Goodyear Touring on 19" Sliptream wheels. I averaged 287 wh/r in mostly freeway use around the western US (climbing hot) driving mostly 65-70 mph. I purchased 20x9" TST and DSW06 245/40-20 and am now at 6,900 total miles, so nearly 2k on the "heavier", "noisier" combination. The 2k miles have been mostly local driving with a few highway runs and the average wh/r is up to 293 (the total average wh/r is 290). Personally I think the Goodyears are only quieter on really noisy road surfaces and the traction improvement of the DWS06 is worth it. Also the DWS06 have yet to try and hydroplane on me like the Goodyears did. I have driven both tires in standing water at speed, the Goodyears were disappointing. I have used several other Continental products on performance cars and they have been in my opinion a fine product. I have used Michelin and Goodyear tires on performance vehicles as well and I would rank Goodyear 3rd. I like to have as much traction and control as possible at the tires for the intended use and let the traction control and AWD use those tools to keep me out of trouble. If I was commuting locally only I would have no trouble with the Goodyear tires. Knowing the local roads and conditions I would adjust to their limitations easily. Hope this helps and as always YMMV.
     
  10. cab

    cab Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    Grapevine, TX
    This is great feedback. I am swapping out my 21" PS2s for a set of take-off 19" slipstreams with the new Goodyear touring tires (with the foam) this week. I am doing it primarily to reduce road noise (secondarily for comfort...range is not a concern)...particularly on our grooved concrete freeways here in the DFW area.

    As these tires are pretty new there hasn't been a lot of feedback here on the forum so nice to read some. I don't expect them to handle as well as the DWS06es, much less my PS2s...I'll know if it was worth it soon enough.

    I have low expectations for reductions in impact thwop noise, but again, I'll know soon.
     
  11. ColBatGuano

    ColBatGuano Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2016
    Messages:
    74
    Location:
    Texas
    The THWOP noise will reduce slightly because the 21" (plus michelins) are a stiffer sidewall than the 19" Goodyears. The foam does very little for that type of sound (tar repair, expansion joint) IMO and I have noticed very little difference in my 19" and 20". However the humming/screaming noise that ground concrete makes should reduce noticeably. Also the "tar rock chip" resurfacing that Texas loves to put on asphalt roads should be less irritating. The smaller tread blocks of the Goodyears doesn't seem to transmit as much of the frequency vibration to the steering wheel.

    I keep thinking I might use my 19" with the Goodyears for ski trips but I believe the tires are ill suited for that use and the wheels have a trough behind the spokes that could hold a lot of ice. So my other options are to use a light set of 19" (possibly the factory split 5 spoke) with either the same DWS06 or a more snow specific tire, or just run the 20" everywhere. Being slightly cheap I may go with the last option.
     
  12. cab

    cab Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    Grapevine, TX
    Yeah, if I were you I would just run the DWS06 everywhere. I expect they will wear pretty well, and are a better than average compromise based on my experience. I had high hopes for the Micheline pilot sport AS III but the reviews are just OK for that tire and the Conti DWS always comes out well for high perf all seasons. Tires: a perpetual compromise.
     
  13. Dukeybootie

    Dukeybootie Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    United States
    @SomeJoe7777, I have my eye on both the Primacy and the Pilot Sport A/S 3+ but are you sure about the treadwear comparison? I find it puzzling that a LRR tire would wear faster than a performance minded tire.

    95% of my driving is highway cruising and I corner with purpose (but not aggressively). The OEM Primacy tires have been great so far but if the Pilot Sports last noticeably longer, I'd go with them since I average 25000 miles/year. Energy consumption not an issue.
     
  14. SomeJoe7777

    SomeJoe7777 Marginally-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2015
    Messages:
    534
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I'm basing my guess as to treadwear on the experiences posted here regarding the Primacy, and the treadwear rating comparisons on TireRack.com.

    There are a few sporadic posts here regarding the treadwear on the Primacys, and it looks like people have experienced anywhere between 25K and 50K. My own tracking of my tire wear on the Primacys suggests about 25K:


    [​IMG]


    On TireRack.com, the consumer rating for the Tread Wear category on the Primacy's is 8.0 out of 10.0.

    I do not have a set of the Pilot A/S 3+ tires, but they are the same UTG rating as the Primacy's (500 AA A), but the TireRack.com consumer rating for them in the Tread Wear category is 9.4. This suggests they'll last longer than the Primacy's, although I agree with you that it's counter-intuitive that a performance tire should outlast a grand touring tire.
     

Share This Page