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Best Charging practice given my circumstance

Look for some feedback.
I have a 2022 M3LR

I have owned the car since Dec. 2021 and I put about 3k miles a month on it.

I have tried multiple different charging practices with consideration given to Battery longevity, cost for super charging etc.

I have about 6% degradation so far on my Battery.
My house has a 40AMP charger with a cost of about .08c per kWh
My work is free to charge
The supercharger station I can stop at is about .33c per kWh depending on the time
I make a long drive at the beginning of the week and then at the end of the week, depending on the week (about 300 miles each way).

I'm looking for best practice opinions:

1. Ideal option. Charge at home to 100% then make the drive and get to Destination. Next day (without charging overnight, not an option) drive to work and charge there to 90% and make my normal short (in comparison) commute through the week. End of week, charge at work to 100% and make the long drive back. Never need to supercharge but charge to 100% twice a week.

2. Charge at home to 90%, hit supercharger (preferably a 150kW which I have on my way). Then normal charging through week and 90% with hitting supercharger on long drive back. Never need to charge to 100%

I'm trying to figure out which is best in terms of Battery degradation vs cost to supercharge (also the effects of battery degradation due to supercharging taken into consideration).

What do you all think?

I appreciate any feedback.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
16,668
21,948
Riverside Co. CA
I would do whatever is most convenient, which sounds like option 1. Just make sure that you dont let the car sit at 100% for too long. Use scheduled charging to try to finish charging shortly before you leave.

Im also trying to figure out where in CA you could have an 8cents a kWh to charge cost, unless you are either commuting from outside the state into it, or calculating that from the cost of your solar install or something.
 
I would do whatever is most convenient, which sounds like option 1. Just make sure that you dont let the car sit at 100% for too long. Use scheduled charging to try to finish charging shortly before you leave.

Im also trying to figure out where in CA you could have an 8cents a kWh to charge cost, unless you are either commuting from outside the state into it, or calculating that from the cost of your solar install or something.
I live in AZ and work in CA so power is much cheaper across the border.

Thank you for the feedback!
 
When choosing between two less-than-optimum charge requirements, I'm inclined to favor a high SOC level (90 or 100%), obtained with a Level 2 charger, than Supercharging. DC fast charging raises pack temperature considerably, and unless you're in an area with cold ambient temps, which will help bring that pack temp down, the pack remains elevated for a considerable period of time.

Just do what @jjrandorin suggested and schedule your 100% SOC shortly before you leave. And since it sounds like you can charge at will once you're at your work location, I'd recommend charging to a lower SOC every night, as opposed to a single 90% charge which you slowly bleed down.

But, yeah, by all means use Supercharging if you need to.

Glad to hear you're putting some serious miles on your Model 3!
 
When choosing between two less-than-optimum charge requirements, I'm inclined to favor a high SOC level (90 or 100%), obtained with a Level 2 charger, than Supercharging. DC fast charging raises pack temperature considerably, and unless you're in an area with cold ambient temps, which will help bring that pack temp down, the pack remains elevated for a considerable period of time.

Just do what @jjrandorin suggested and schedule your 100% SOC shortly before you leave. And since it sounds like you can charge at will once you're at your work location, I'd recommend charging to a lower SOC every night, as opposed to a single 90% charge which you slowly bleed down.

But, yeah, by all means use Supercharging if you need to.

Glad to hear you're putting some serious miles on your Model 3!
Great response! Thank you for the feedback!
 
Optimal for battery degradation is low SOC, which is likely supercharging between 0-50%. However given your circumstances charging at home and work will be so much cheaper, there's not much point in hyper-optimizing to maintain a few percent less battery degradation.

Given your driving habits of 35k miles/yr is quite a bit above average. The LFP RWD would have been more suited for heavy usage if you're planning on keeping the car long term.
 
Optimal for battery degradation is low SOC, which is likely supercharging between 0-50%. However given your circumstances charging at home and work will be so much cheaper, there's not much point in hyper-optimizing to maintain a few percent less battery degradation.

Given your driving habits of 35k miles/yr is quite a bit above average. The LFP RWD would have been more suited for heavy usage if you're planning on keeping the car long term.
Agreed! The LFP chemistry had not fully rolled out when I ordered the car and there was speculation as to which one I would actually receive had I ordered the SR. Since I do drive so much and will more than likely get a new car every couple of years, I will be getting the LFP on the next round. Just wanted to use best practices while I do have this one since the future is never a for sure thing.

Thank you for the feedback!
 
For your non LFP car, the best thing for battery longevity is to keep the charge as close to 50% as possible. For example, keeping it between 40-60% is better than keeping it between 30-70%, etc. And by battery longevity, I mean a long, long time. Like 250K+ miles.
Do not charge to 100% unless you need the range and are going to drive right away. Also, do not run the battery down to low states of charge (below 10%) unless you need the range and are going to charge right away.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
16,668
21,948
Riverside Co. CA
Charge to 100 if that’s the most convenient. Don’t overthink it. A great deal of the battery health “best practices” you’ll hear on these forums is mostly sorcery and lore.
TMC Magic Tome.png


(its been a long time since I played tabletop RPGs but my mind went to this when you said "sorcery and lore", lol)
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
4,642
4,378
Maine
Look for some feedback.
I have a 2022 M3LR

I have owned the car since Dec. 2021 and I put about 3k miles a month on it.

I have tried multiple different charging practices with consideration given to Battery longevity, cost for super charging etc.

I have about 6% degradation so far on my Battery.
My house has a 40AMP charger with a cost of about .08c per kWh
My work is free to charge
The supercharger station I can stop at is about .33c per kWh depending on the time
I make a long drive at the beginning of the week and then at the end of the week, depending on the week (about 300 miles each way).

I'm looking for best practice opinions:

1. Ideal option. Charge at home to 100% then make the drive and get to Destination. Next day (without charging overnight, not an option) drive to work and charge there to 90% and make my normal short (in comparison) commute through the week. End of week, charge at work to 100% and make the long drive back. Never need to supercharge but charge to 100% twice a week.

2. Charge at home to 90%, hit supercharger (preferably a 150kW which I have on my way). Then normal charging through week and 90% with hitting supercharger on long drive back. Never need to charge to 100%

I'm trying to figure out which is best in terms of Battery degradation vs cost to supercharge (also the effects of battery degradation due to supercharging taken into consideration).

What do you all think?

I appreciate any feedback.
Obviously you already have 8months of real world data to draw from, but I kind of question option 1 because it's not easy to drive 300 miles, in high heat without having to stop and charge, unless you go slowly. And, time is money, and isn't this whole exercise to figure out what saves you the most money?

Personally, I'd go for whatever is the fastest and easiest. I don't find having to go slow when traffic is zooming by, to be easy. I don't find having to watch the trip screen to make sure I can make my destination, to be easy. My general trip strategy is to drive as fast as I'm corfortable with, and charge at as low a SOC as I'm comfortable with and repeat.

I find charging up to 100% right before I leave, on a trip to be one step too many, to have to remember, so I don't ever do it. Once you decide to make at least one stop, you open up lots of possibilities. If you choose Option 2, you can drive faster, and not have to stress about driving 300 miles without stopping. And while I can drive 300 miles without stopping, stopping halfway seems like an ideal time to take a pitstop, to get a coffee, use the toilet, why not charge too? The negative is it costs to supercharge. But, as I already said, time is money. I bet the time you save is worth more than the cost to supercharge.

Factoring in degradation, I'd think keeping the SOC under 60% would be ideal, during the week, then charging up to 90% before leaving. Then again, that's an extra step, which I try to avoid, for fear I'd forget to charge up to 90% before leaving. So, maybe just keep it simple and keep your SOC at 80% all week long and don't worry about charging up extra before leaving.
 
Obviously you already have 8months of real world data to draw from, but I kind of question option 1 because it's not easy to drive 300 miles, in high heat without having to stop and charge, unless you go slowly. And, time is money, and isn't this whole exercise to figure out what saves you the most money?

Personally, I'd go for whatever is the fastest and easiest. I don't find having to go slow when traffic is zooming by, to be easy. I don't find having to watch the trip screen to make sure I can make my destination, to be easy. My general trip strategy is to drive as fast as I'm corfortable with, and charge at as low a SOC as I'm comfortable with and repeat.

I find charging up to 100% right before I leave, on a trip to be one step too many, to have to remember, so I don't ever do it. Once you decide to make at least one stop, you open up lots of possibilities. If you choose Option 2, you can drive faster, and not have to stress about driving 300 miles without stopping. And while I can drive 300 miles without stopping, stopping halfway seems like an ideal time to take a pitstop, to get a coffee, use the toilet, why not charge too? The negative is it costs to supercharge. But, as I already said, time is money. I bet the time you save is worth more than the cost to supercharge.

Factoring in degradation, I'd think keeping the SOC under 60% would be ideal, during the week, then charging up to 90% before leaving. Then again, that's an extra step, which I try to avoid, for fear I'd forget to charge up to 90% before leaving. So, maybe just keep it simple and keep your SOC at 80% all week long and don't worry about charging up extra before leaving.
Thank you for the reply!

Depending on the route it's actually exactly 284 miles (shortest distance) or 302 miles (longest distance but fastest average MPH).
I do have to keep it between 65-70 to make it without stopping and if there is a head wind that is strong, which is common, then I do stop and charge for 5 min. I made it with 1% left one time due to head wind! With the new updates its much more accurate with projections though. I kind of find it a challenge to get there without stopping. Other times, I say skrew it and get there as fast as possible and definitely stop to charge, get food, Coffee etc.

Thanks again!
 
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Reactions: KenC
Thank you for the reply!

Depending on the route it's actually exactly 284 miles (shortest distance) or 302 miles (longest distance but fastest average MPH).
I do have to keep it between 65-70 to make it without stopping and if there is a head wind that is strong, which is common, then I do stop and charge for 5 min. I made it with 1% left one time due to head wind! With the new updates its much more accurate with projections though. I kind of find it a challenge to get there without stopping. Other times, I say skrew it and get there as fast as possible and definitely stop to charge, get food, Coffee etc.

Thanks again!
 
Charge to 100 if that’s the most convenient. Don’t overthink it. A great deal of the battery health “best practices” you’ll hear on these forums is mostly sorcery

Charge to 100 if that’s the most convenient. Don’t overthink it. A great deal of the battery health “best practices” you’ll hear on these forums is mostly lol, thank
 
Look for some feedback.
I have a 2022 M3LR

I have owned the car since Dec. 2021 and I put about 3k miles a month on it.

I have tried multiple different charging practices with consideration given to Battery longevity, cost for super charging etc.

I have about 6% degradation so far on my Battery.
My house has a 40AMP charger with a cost of about .08c per kWh
My work is free to charge
The supercharger station I can stop at is about .33c per kWh depending on the time
I make a long drive at the beginning of the week and then at the end of the week, depending on the week (about 300 miles each way).

I'm looking for best practice opinions:

1. Ideal option. Charge at home to 100% then make the drive and get to Destination. Next day (without charging overnight, not an option) drive to work and charge there to 90% and make my normal short (in comparison) commute through the week. End of week, charge at work to 100% and make the long drive back. Never need to supercharge but charge to 100% twice a week.

2. Charge at home to 90%, hit supercharger (preferably a 150kW which I have on my way). Then normal charging through week and 90% with hitting supercharger on long drive back. Never need to charge to 100%

I'm trying to figure out which is best in terms of Battery degradation vs cost to supercharge (also the effects of battery degradation due to supercharging taken into consideration).

What do you all think?

I appreciate any feedback.
We have had good luck and good battery function with charging at home to 80%. We only up it to 100% when there is a trip to LA to visit Grandma
 

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