Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • The final cut of the 9th episode of the Tesla Motors Club Podcast, featuring Chad Schwitters, the former president of Plug In America, is now available. You can watch it now on YouTube or listen to it on all major podcast networks.

Beta Testing and You

Here's something for everyone who uses a beta product on their Tesla to keep in mind:

Autopilot - Beta and has yet to be released
Navigate on AP - Beta and has yet to be released
Summon - Beta and has yet to be released
Smart Summon - Beta and has yet to be released

In order to use any of these products, you had to give consent that you knew you were a beta tester and you knew you were still responsible for your car's actions. So, in fact, you agreed to be a beta tester for Tesla. If you do not like the product, if you are afraid of the product, if you do not think the product should be used, then stop testing it. Because, if you have an accident while using any of those products above, you are at fault. Not Tesla.

Complaining about the beta products not being fully developed, tested, safe, secure, etc. is pointless, as they are beta and are not fully developed, tested, safe, secure, etc.
 

Shemp

Member
Supporting Member
Sep 20, 2019
63
53
Detroit
I think Tesla has to do this... otherwise they could be held liable for anything that happened whether the fault of the system or not. This is the early days of this technology... it is still being developed, refined and error-proofed. I understand that and I'm happy to have Autopilot available... I "beta test" it almost every day. :)
 
That's abdication of responsibility. Regardless of agreeing to 'beta testing' software, if Tesla releases something tomorrow that swerves itself into walls, that's at least primarily Tesla's responsibility.

Just because something is in beta testing doesn't mean that people don't have a right to complain about features being half-baked, useless, or dangerous. I agree that people probably complain too much (and, most people that get into accidents in Tesla's are looking for excuses to their bad behavior), but a lot of folks have very real concerns and have every right to complain.

How long was Gmail in "beta" ? It's just an excuse companies use to say "lalala it's beta, this isn't MY fault".

On the balance, I still use Autopilot and other features daily... but that doesn't mean I have no right to complain when it slams on the brakes unexpectedly.
 

Shemp

Member
Supporting Member
Sep 20, 2019
63
53
Detroit
no doubt users have a right to complain, send feedback, even pursue compensation if some error in the system causes an accident.... however you will do so having signed up to be a "beta tester". Yes, companies absolutely use that to cover themselves when they are releasing/refining unproven technology. What would Teslas be like if nothing was ever released until it is ironclad and bulletproof? They would be a lot like the car you traded in to get your Tesla, probably. We are on the leading edge for a lot of these technologies... if that scares you maybe you bought the wrong car or at least should not have agree to be a "beta tester"

...just my $0.02
 
How long was Gmail in "beta" ? It's just an excuse companies use to say "lalala it's beta, this isn't MY fault".

This is something I am still pissed at Google for doing: forever corrupting the meaning of the term “beta.” Beta tests traditionally were only done after most major bugs were fixed and only edge cases remained, and was typically limited to a select population of users. You only truly released to the public when it was really version 1. Google initially tried to do this by doing an invitation system, but perhaps unintentionally made those invites gain a ton of cachet. (I should I know, I got my Gmail account in 2004, and people were begging me to give them an invite.) But because they left the beta tag in Gmail up for years, long past when anyone else would have called it version 1, lots of other companies followed suit and people began to think “beta” meant “cheaper and only slightly rougher” version, and started to feel entitled to it as a way to get a product for free.

But that’s for an email program. I would have been far more circumspect in releasing FSD to the wider public, probably not even allowing people to buy them until it was near the end of the beta tests. It seems Tesla has changed strategies a lot and backtracked several times when they realized the software wasn’t really as ready as they thought. It’s a sign that not only they are a young company, but that they operate much more like a software shop than a carmaker. Most carmakers are so cautious that the tech in them feels a decade behind. Tesla still seems to be figuring out that making cars and writing software aren’t quite the same thing.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top