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Buying an extra Gen 2 Mobile Connector for charging at home?

I'm going to take delivery for my SR+ in two weeks. My garage has a NEMA 10-50 welder outlet so I can do 32A charging and already ordered the necessary adapters.

Just thinking, if I don't want to drag out the included gen2 mobile connector to plug/unplug every day to charge in my garage, will it be a good idea to just buy an extra gen2 mobile connector and leave it permanently connected in the garage.

Gen 2 Mobile Connector Bundle

It seems that for similar charge rating/power, Tesla gen 2 mobile connector is actually the cheapest option on the market. Any other better options at similar price/performance value? I don't think I need the HPWC etc. Thanks!
 
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if you can spring for it, it's good to have the backup. i travel between mine and my GF's house and would love to have a spare. that said, the Gen2 is really your "only" option with the SR+. the wall unit won't provide you enough benefit for the money invested (charging limited to 40A anyway).

i've been keeping an eye on the FS forums and the pricing is right around what Tesla charges new (minus the adapter), so take your pick.
 
if you can spring for it, it's good to have the backup. i travel between mine and my GF's house and would love to have a spare. that said, the Gen2 is really your "only" option with the SR+. the wall unit won't provide you enough benefit for the money invested (charging limited to 40A anyway).

i've been keeping an eye on the FS forums and the pricing is right around what Tesla charges new (minus the adapter), so take your pick.

Where is the FS forum located in TMC?
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,351
10,741
Boise, ID
Just thinking, if I don't want to drag out the included gen2 mobile connector to plug/unplug every day to charge in my garage, will it be a good idea to just buy an extra gen2 mobile connector and leave it permanently connected in the garage.
I know you are new to it and nervous about it, but you could not buy an extra one and still leave it permanently connected in the garage. A lot of owners do that, and I'm going on nearly six years that way. Most people don't use up over 200 miles in a day driving around town, and a few times a year, when on a trip, sure, unplug it and take it with you. But it's really unusual that you could ever have a need to plug into an outlet away from home if you are not on a purposeful trip, where you would plan and pack, and would therefore take it with you.

Keep in mind that all public charging stations have their own cords and are not outlets, so the mobile cord isn't even used for any of those. And if you are in or near some decent sized city, they have charging stations.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,275
7,785
MA, NH
Yes, good idea to dedicate one UMC for Mobile and one for home. Also keep in mind your outlet should be GFCI (it is code now, but a good idea regardless).

Since you are considering buying a UMC, you should not rule out a Wall Connector instead.
Wall Connector is much beefier, much better for outdoor use, doesn't require GFCI (because they are hard wired) and you can get full usage of your 50A Circuit where you cannot with the UMC. Wall Connector also avoids the weakest link of the UMC which is the plug in the wall. Wall Connector can do load balancing with another Wall Connector off the same circuit if you ever need to in the future.

Often folks are selling Referral Ones that were gifted for around $400.00

Unless you still need the Welding Outlet. But some folks daisy chain an outlet off the Wall Connector run (but that doesn't meet code as far as I know).
 
Whatever you do, don't plug and unplug it every day. The outlet can wear out.

Yeah, I think that most people don't need to carry one around on a daily basis, and I would encourage you to just leave the one plugged in at home. Only unplug it and take it along when you're going on a long trip. However, if you really do want a second one, consider the wall connector instead. It's just a better built and more versatile product all around.
 
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srs5694

Active Member
Jan 15, 2019
1,496
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Woonsocket, RI
Note that, for most people, there's little or no need to keep the Mobile Connector with the car at all times. That would be useful mainly if you charge regularly at work off an outdoor outlet. For most trips, you go there and have plenty of charge to get back home; or you may charge at your destination using a Tesla Destination station, a J1772 EVSE, or a DC fast charger. You do not need the Mobile Connector to use any of those (although you may need the J1772 adapter). Thus, you may be able to keep the Mobile Connector plugged into the wall outlet at home most of the time, and unplug it only if/when you need to take it with you -- for instance, if you're going on a road trip and want to be able to charge at your destination.

That said, others have noted some reasons you might not want to do this -- having a backup EVSE can be handy in case the one that comes with the car fails; and you might easily forget to unplug the Mobile Connector and take it with you on a road trip. There are usually other ways to deal with these problems, like local public charging to use temporarily in case of a failure or forgotten EVSE; but it's likely to be more convenient to have a backup. Whether it's worth paying the price for a redundant Mobile Connector is another question.

In addition to the option of a Gen2 Mobile Connector or the Gen1 Mobile Connector that's already been mentioned, you might consider a couple of other options:
  • Wall Connector -- Tesla's Wall Connector is typically hard-wired and can charge LR Model 3s, as well as all Model Ss and Model Xs, at a faster rate than either Mobile Connector, provided it's wired to a circuit with enough amperage. As you're getting an SR+, you won't see any more speed out of a Wall Connector then out of a Mobile Connector, but the extra speed could be a modest benefit if you get a more-capable Tesla in the future. The Wall Connector also carries a NEMA 3R weather rating, which could be important if you wanted to install it outside; but it sounds like you want to use it inside your garage, so that's likely not an issue for you. The Wall Connector costs $500, IIRC, so it is more expensive than the Mobile Connector, and as it's hard-wired, you'd need to run a new line, hard-wire it in place of your existing NEMA 10-50 outlet, or fit a NEMA 10-50 plug on the Wall Connector (which would nullify its UL listing).
  • A third-party J1772 EVSE -- Some of these cost about as much as a Mobile Connector, but the ones that can equal the Mobile Connector's 32A speed typically cost at least $400, and usually $500 or more. Thus, you won't save money this way. A few, like the JuiceBox, ChargePoint Home, and OpenEVSE, provide network connectivity, which might be of interest if you're a data junkie or want to be able to control the EVSE remotely -- but you can get most of those features via the Tesla, so that doesn't provide a lot of added value, IMHO. Most can be bought in either plug or hard-wired forms, although I haven't checked to see how common NEMA 10-50 plugs are -- NEMA 14-50 is probably more common. The biggest advantage to this approach is that you can easily charge non-Tesla EVs with them, which may be important if you plan to buy one in the future or if you have friends or relatives who might visit you in non-Tesla EVs and want to charge. You'll need to use Tesla's J1772 adapter if you go this route, and plug/unplug it whenever you use it to keep with the car, not take the adapter with you when you leave, or buy a second adapter for $95. Overall, this is probably not the best choice unless you want to be able to charge a non-Tesla EV; but it's worth mentioning as an option. Note that you can charge a non-Tesla EV with a Tesla Wall Connector or Mobile Connector, but you need a third-party adapter, which typically costs $200 or $250.
 

duanra

Active Member
Dec 14, 2018
1,372
853
Montreal
I bought a second one and I really like it this way. At work (when I am lucky), I can plug the car in 120v. So this way, it is very convenient for me. Plus, if one breaks, I have a back up.
I would say that the wall connector makes sense if you have a long range and you need to charge quicker than 32A.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,275
7,785
MA, NH
Whatever you do, don't plug and unplug it every day. The outlet can wear out.

Yeah, I think that most people don't need to carry one around on a daily basis, and I would encourage you to just leave the one plugged in at home. Only unplug it and take it along when you're going on a long trip. However, if you really do want a second one, consider the wall connector instead. It's just a better built and more versatile product all around.

The more infrequent you need the UMC the more likely you are to forget it when you need it. I treat a UMC kept in the car like I do my tire plug kit, jack etc.. I never plan to have to use it, but it's all there for piece of mind. And wall connectors are better for daily charging any way.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,275
7,785
MA, NH
Note that, for most people, there's little or no need to keep the Mobile Connector with the car at all times. That would be useful mainly if you charge regularly at work off an outdoor outlet. For most trips, you go there and have plenty of charge to get back home; or you may charge at your destination using a Tesla Destination station, a J1772 EVSE, or a DC fast charger. You do not need the Mobile Connector to use any of those (although you may need the J1772 adapter). Thus, you may be able to keep the Mobile Connector plugged into the wall outlet at home most of the time, and unplug it only if/when you need to take it with you -- for instance, if you're going on a road trip and want to be able to charge at your destination.

That said, others have noted some reasons you might not want to do this -- having a backup EVSE can be handy in case the one that comes with the car fails; and you might easily forget to unplug the Mobile Connector and take it with you on a road trip. There are usually other ways to deal with these problems, like local public charging to use temporarily in case of a failure or forgotten EVSE; but it's likely to be more convenient to have a backup. Whether it's worth paying the price for a redundant Mobile Connector is another question.

In addition to the option of a Gen2 Mobile Connector or the Gen1 Mobile Connector that's already been mentioned, you might consider a couple of other options:
  • Wall Connector -- Tesla's Wall Connector is typically hard-wired and can charge LR Model 3s, as well as all Model Ss and Model Xs, at a faster rate than either Mobile Connector, provided it's wired to a circuit with enough amperage. As you're getting an SR+, you won't see any more speed out of a Wall Connector then out of a Mobile Connector, but the extra speed could be a modest benefit if you get a more-capable Tesla in the future. The Wall Connector also carries a NEMA 3R weather rating, which could be important if you wanted to install it outside; but it sounds like you want to use it inside your garage, so that's likely not an issue for you. The Wall Connector costs $500, IIRC, so it is more expensive than the Mobile Connector, and as it's hard-wired, you'd need to run a new line, hard-wire it in place of your existing NEMA 10-50 outlet, or fit a NEMA 10-50 plug on the Wall Connector (which would nullify its UL listing).
  • A third-party J1772 EVSE -- Some of these cost about as much as a Mobile Connector, but the ones that can equal the Mobile Connector's 32A speed typically cost at least $400, and usually $500 or more. Thus, you won't save money this way. A few, like the JuiceBox, ChargePoint Home, and OpenEVSE, provide network connectivity, which might be of interest if you're a data junkie or want to be able to control the EVSE remotely -- but you can get most of those features via the Tesla, so that doesn't provide a lot of added value, IMHO. Most can be bought in either plug or hard-wired forms, although I haven't checked to see how common NEMA 10-50 plugs are -- NEMA 14-50 is probably more common. The biggest advantage to this approach is that you can easily charge non-Tesla EVs with them, which may be important if you plan to buy one in the future or if you have friends or relatives who might visit you in non-Tesla EVs and want to charge. You'll need to use Tesla's J1772 adapter if you go this route, and plug/unplug it whenever you use it to keep with the car, not take the adapter with you when you leave, or buy a second adapter for $95. Overall, this is probably not the best choice unless you want to be able to charge a non-Tesla EV; but it's worth mentioning as an option. Note that you can charge a non-Tesla EV with a Tesla Wall Connector or Mobile Connector, but you need a third-party adapter, which typically costs $200 or $250.

Why would he need a new line for a wall connector? It depends on what he needs going forward.

But you bring up a good point. Tesla does not make a 10-50 UMC Adapter (frustrating as that is). So you need to buy a 3rd party adapter (which is pricey) for the UMC. So to meet code you're more likely to need to run a new line for 14-50 despite the fact the UMC nor Wall Connector actually use the Neutral.

And I think it's a really bad Idea to put the Wall Connector on a plug. You have no temperature Monitoring on the plug if you do that, but you do if you use a UMC. This is extra important if you ran the Wall Connector at the full capacity of the 10-50 outlet. You would be defeating some of the safety net the Wall Connector provides. I don't know for a fact but the Plug In Wall Connector highly likely has a temperature monitor on the plug. And you'd have to make the outlet GFCI.

Hardwired Wall Connector solves a lot of gotcha's.

Also looking at juicebox etc. is a good idea too !!! I wish I had.
 
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Thank you guys for these very useful inputs. I'm new to EV so yes a bit nervous how this charging thing may work out the best. Guess I will leave the included UMC (as you guys call it) plugged in the garage first and how things may work out.

By the way, my school garage has six level II charging spots, but the waiting list to get EV parking permit is THREE years. Damn.
 
Why would he need a new line for a wall connector? It depends on what he needs going forward.

But you bring up a good point. Tesla does not make a 10-50 UMC Adapter (frustrating as that is). So you need to buy a 3rd party adapter (which is pricey) for the UMC. So to meet code you're more likely to need to run a new line for 14-50 despite the fact the UMC nor Wall Connector actually use the Neutral.

And I think it's a really bad Idea to put the Wall Connector on a plug. You have no temperature Monitoring on the plug if you do that, but you do if you use a UMC. This is extra important if you ran the Wall Connector at the full capacity of the 10-50 outlet. You would be defeating some of the safety net the Wall Connector provides. I don't know for a fact but the Plug In Wall Connector highly likely has a temperature monitor on the plug. And you'd have to make the outlet GFCI.

Hardwired Wall Connector solves a lot of gotcha's.

Also looking at juicebox etc. is a good idea too !!! I wish I had.
Can't disagree with this post more. You can use a third party adapter, as you noted. The third party adapters from evseadapter.com preserve the temperature sensor, so no problem there. You can also convert the outlet to a 6-50 without running a new circuit. In fact, I can't think of a single reason why the OP would need or want to run new wire.
 
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ibdb

Any excuse for a road trip
Apr 29, 2015
435
258
Puyallup, WA
In a combined 60K miles between our S and 3 over the last 4.5 years, I've never had a need to use the mobile connector outside our house. I've always been able to rely on Superchargers, destination chargers, and, very rarely, public chargers.

If you're concerned about the cost of buying an extra, you might want to wait a bit to see if it's really something that you'll need to use. For us, we've connected it at home to a 14-50 outlet, and charge both our cars off the one that originally came with our S. I've tested out the one with the 3 a few times, but it primarily just sits idle. Even on our 2K mile road trips, it never saw the light of day.
 

srs5694

Active Member
Jan 15, 2019
1,496
1,983
Woonsocket, RI
The Wall Connector costs $500, IIRC, so it is more expensive than the Mobile Connector, and as it's hard-wired, you'd need to run a new line, hard-wire it in place of your existing NEMA 10-50 outlet, or fit a NEMA 10-50 plug on the Wall Connector (which would nullify its UL listing).
Why would he need a new line for a wall connector? It depends on what he needs going forward.

That was one of three possibilities I presented, the other two being hard-wiring it with the existing circuit (essentially swapping out the NEMA 10-50 socket for the Wall Connector) and fitting a NEMA 10-50 plug on the Wall Connector. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. Running a new circuit would enable running the Wall Connector at full power (which would be of no value when charging @Yang_H's SR+, but could be useful for visiting friends or relatives or in the future). It might also be desirable if the existing wiring was found to be in bad condition or too thin for the intended purpose. It would also preserve the existing NEMA 10-50 outlet if it has some other use. OTOH, running a new circuit would take more effort and cost more, especially if that would put the household load calculation above the available input amperage. Ultimately, it's up to @Yang_H to decide what to do; we can only present ideas.

But you bring up a good point. Tesla does not make a 10-50 UMC Adapter (frustrating as that is). So you need to buy a 3rd party adapter (which is pricey) for the UMC.

I'd missed that issue, actually, but it's an important point. It means that to use the Mobile Connector on the NEMA 10-50 circuit, it would be necessary to replace that NEMA 10-50 plug with something else (NEMA 6-50 or NEMA 14-50; the former is likely to be easy, but the latter may require running a new wire) or buy a third-party adapter, like this one ($59). Chances are the third-party adapter would be cheaper than buying a Tesla 50A adapter and replacing the existing socket, even though the third-party adapter is more expensive than the ones that Tesla sells.

And I think it's a really bad Idea to put the Wall Connector on a plug. You have no temperature Monitoring on the plug if you do that, but you do if you use a UMC.

It's true that you'd be missing temperature sensors; but I question how important that is. I don't recall any other manufacturer touting such features on their plug-in EVSEs. This article comparing the Gen1 and Gen2 Mobile connectors notes the temperature sensor in the Gen2 product, but makes no mention of it in the Gen1, which seems to suggest it's missing from that earlier product, too. That said, I can't disagree all that strongly with your point -- in fact, I even highlighted the fact that fitting a plug to a Wall Connector would nullify its UL rating. Even if a temperature sensor on a wall plug is an uncommon feature, it is at least a theoretically useful one.

The third party adapters from evseadapter.com preserve the temperature sensor, so no problem there.

I think you mean evseadapters.com (with an "s"). They do indeed have such a product; I've provided a direct link to the product above.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,275
7,785
MA, NH
That was one of three possibilities I presented, the other two being hard-wiring it with the existing circuit (essentially swapping out the NEMA 10-50 socket for the Wall Connector) and fitting a NEMA 10-50 plug on the Wall Connector. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. Running a new circuit would enable running the Wall Connector at full power (which would be of no value when charging @Yang_H's SR+, but could be useful for visiting friends or relatives or in the future). It might also be desirable if the existing wiring was found to be in bad condition or too thin for the intended purpose. It would also preserve the existing NEMA 10-50 outlet if it has some other use. OTOH, running a new circuit would take more effort and cost more, especially if that would put the household load calculation above the available input amperage. Ultimately, it's up to @Yang_H to decide what to do; we can only present ideas.



I'd missed that issue, actually, but it's an important point. It means that to use the Mobile Connector on the NEMA 10-50 circuit, it would be necessary to replace that NEMA 10-50 plug with something else (NEMA 6-50 or NEMA 14-50; the former is likely to be easy, but the latter may require running a new wire) or buy a third-party adapter, like this one ($59). Chances are the third-party adapter would be cheaper than buying a Tesla 50A adapter and replacing the existing socket, even though the third-party adapter is more expensive than the ones that Tesla sells.



It's true that you'd be missing temperature sensors; but I question how important that is. I don't recall any other manufacturer touting such features on their plug-in EVSEs. This article comparing the Gen1 and Gen2 Mobile connectors notes the temperature sensor in the Gen2 product, but makes no mention of it in the Gen1, which seems to suggest it's missing from that earlier product, too. That said, I can't disagree all that strongly with your point -- in fact, I even highlighted the fact that fitting a plug to a Wall Connector would nullify its UL rating. Even if a temperature sensor on a wall plug is an uncommon feature, it is at least a theoretically useful one.



I think you mean evseadapters.com (with an "s"). They do indeed have such a product; I've provided a direct link to the product above.

UMC $275
GFCI $100 + Labor if you need Electrician.
6-50 conversion $100 Electrician

$475+ Total

Wall Connector looks better and better.

Reason why non temperature monitored plugs are a bad idea. This thread someone also suggested a wall connector is your best bet. Mobile connectors are for mobile use.

Car charger plug melted | Tesla
 
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mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,275
7,785
MA, NH
Can't disagree with this post more. You can use a third party adapter, as you noted. The third party adapters from evseadapter.com preserve the temperature sensor, so no problem there. You can also convert the outlet to a 6-50 without running a new circuit. In fact, I can't think of a single reason why the OP would need or want to run new wire.

Yes, 6-50 will work.
 
I know you are new to it and nervous about it, but you could not buy an extra one and still leave it permanently connected in the garage. A lot of owners do that, and I'm going on nearly six years that way. Most people don't use up over 200 miles in a day driving around town, and a few times a year, when on a trip, sure, unplug it and take it with you. But it's really unusual that you could ever have a need to plug into an outlet away from home if you are not on a purposeful trip, where you would plan and pack, and would therefore take it with you.

Keep in mind that all public charging stations have their own cords and are not outlets, so the mobile cord isn't even used for any of those. And if you are in or near some decent sized city, they have charging stations.

Valid points from this guy. Make sure you keep the J adapter in your car though for emergency public spots.
 
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