Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Calling all 2018 - 2019 100D MX - What's your range?

HadoukenZR

Member
Jul 27, 2017
74
75
Bay Area
3/18 , MX 100D. Been driving back on 20" wheels again. ~30K miles. 100% at most is around 265. Ive raised my concern with Tesla and they just told me to charge more regularly to 90% daily basis.

Ive done so for few months now and.... no improvement.

Sucks Ive had 10% battery degradation for a 2yr old car....
 
  • Informative
Reactions: T.R.T.e.s.l.a.
Nov 8, 2018
479
330
LX
Shameless cross posting, but i think this fits here:

I went ahead and my late 2018 MX 100D was delivered yesterday (not to me, but to someone who pick it up for me in another country) and it's already visible in my Tesla account/app.

From the app i can see it shows between 423 km / 436 km at 100% charge, 381 km / 392 km at 90% and 334 km / 345 km at 80% (in miles: 270 / 262 at 100%, 236 / 243 at 90% and 207 / 214 at 80%)

I'm kind of mildly disappointed with those figures since the numbers seen here are generally better than the ones i have, but i'm still ok with this.

What puzzles me the most is the amplitude of the readings i'm getting. I mean at 100% i have already got 423 km and 436 km (a difference of 13km). I have never got such an amplitude in my S85, where the differences at 100% SoC usually varies at about 4 to 5 km.

Maybe i should try to balance the battery when the car gets here?
 

ElectricSteve

Village idiot
Dec 11, 2014
330
272
Switzerland
For the last time (i‘m getting sick of repeating myself):
Charging to 100% very often: BAD
Letting the charge sink too low (below 15%) too often: BAD
Charging at a very high rate (example: Telsa Supercharging) very often: BAD

The range displayed in the car is an approximation, calculated dynamically based on a number of factors (temperatures, past driving behavior etc.) and can vary slightly over time. Tesla is actually quite good at this. Way better than the „guess-o-meter“ in a Nissan Leaf or „I have no idea but i’ll just display some range-left value anyway“ of the current Opel/Vauxhall Corsa-E.

This is true for any EV on the market today. Tesla is no exception. There is no rainbow farting unicorn tech.
Current battery tech cannot handle above scenarios without higher-than-average degradation. I cincerely hope that batteries that can handle this without problems become a reality soon. Until then, don‘t push your batteries too much. Use your common sense. My 2014 MS 85 Battery still had 94% of it‘s original capacity at 220‘000km because I treated it well for the 5.5 years that I owned that vehicle.

Fast DC charging (example: Super charging) beats the crap out of a battery. Do it too often and the BMS will throttle it down to protect the pack. In the Tesla world, this is called the „Supercharger Nerf“.
 
Last edited:

manttium

Member
Mar 31, 2019
42
23
San Diego
The range displayed in the car is an approximation, calculated dynamically based on a number of factors (temperatures, past driving behavior etc.) and can vary slightly over time

I'm not sure that's entirely true. My understanding of the displayed range is that it is the EPA-calculated efficiency number multiplied by the remaining charge in the battery. When extrapolating to 100%, this presumes the actual maximum capacity of the battery, not the factory or theoretical battery capacity - this is where the degradation comes into play. So yes, driving habits and, more importantly, charging habits will affect the maximum possible state of charge, but it's not like the vehicle is saying "hmmm...this driver is using large wheels, likes to floor it, and frequently drives up large hills" and thus uses on average more Wh/mi. It's using the same EPA-calculated Wh/mi, but adjusted to how much charge your batteries can currently store.

In my case, I just took delivery of a CPO 2017 Model X 100D with ~80,000 miles, and the max charge is no longer 98-100kWh - it's closer to 86kWh or so. This gives me a 100% charged range of 261mi currently (which is not very good for a 100D, but I got a good deal on the vehicle, so I'm happy). Note that you can figure this out by taking the displayed range and dividing by the battery percentage (switching the two in the menu), or by sliding your mobile app charging limit to 100%. They give the same answer.
 
Nov 8, 2018
479
330
LX
The range displayed in the car is an approximation, calculated dynamically based on a number of factors (temperatures, past driving behavior etc.) and can vary slightly over time.

That is totally not true.

As for the rest of your post i think we all, or at least most of us, already know that (so i don't know why you get sick of repeating it, if you do repeat it), but still.... your post has nothing to do with the thread title or the original post.

INote that you can figure this out by taking the displayed range and dividing by the battery percentage (switching the two in the menu), or by sliding your mobile app charging limit to 100%. They give the same answer.

And yes, like manttium said, you don't have to actually charge to 100% to check what range you will get if you do charge to 100%. All you have to do is sliding to 100% charge in your Tesla app.
 
Last edited:

aesculus

Still Trying to Figure This All Out
May 31, 2015
4,529
2,599
Northern California
The range displayed in the car is an approximation, calculated dynamically based on a number of factors (temperatures, past driving behavior etc.) and can vary slightly over time.
There are two ranges displayed in Tesla cars:
  1. The range on the center display which is solely determined by SoC and the EPA estimates. So basically only influenced on how much charge is in the battery. Can be affected over time by the health of the battery but has nothing to do with driving habits, weather, etc. It is not dynamic except there is some small change based on temperature of the pack.
  2. The Navigation range. This is a different range and is a projected range based on recent (ie last 40 miles?), expected elevation changes. So it is affected by your driving style and is constantly being adjusted as you drive. This is dynamic.
 

ElectricSteve

Village idiot
Dec 11, 2014
330
272
Switzerland
That is totally not true.
You totally have no clue.

Check out Aesculus’s post below mine. He does a good job of explaining how it works.

As for the rest of your post i think we all, or at least most of us, already know that
Well good for you. Then you are obviously not part of the target audience of my post now are you.

(so i don't know why you get sick of repeating it, if you do repeat it)
Because I (and many others) have been informing people for the past 5 years, incl. publicly on events etc, about, amongst others, EV best practices and it‘s astounding that the same questions and problems and whining (buhuu my battery has less miles that the other person) keep popping up. They are unbelievably persistent (and no one never cared about the gas gauge of the old cars being inaccurate as hell but if the car shows 1 mile less that yesterday then OMG). Some people just don‘t want to learn it seems. These best practices can be found everywhere now and still folks are too lazy to inform themselves. Like burning their fingers and then saying „nobody told me that fire is hot“. Guess i‘m just disappointed in humanity...
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Yinn

ElectricSteve

Village idiot
Dec 11, 2014
330
272
Switzerland
How often is too often Supercharging to cause degradation to your battery?
That is not an easy question to asnwers as it differs per pack. TeslaBjörn found the number for the Model 3 with a specific pack and posted it on youtube.

It‘s not about the number of times one superchargers but about how much energy was transferred in total. After X kW ingested above a certain speed threshold, the Battery Management System activates the so called „nerf“ meaning it caps the speed at which transfers take place. Those threshold numbers are stored in each pack’s BMS and they are not public. Even if they where, There is no readout for us as customers as how much energy was transferred while DC fast charging, so we will not be able to tell „how far one is away from the cap kicking in“ anyway.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: tpduke112
Nov 8, 2018
479
330
LX
Check out Aesculus’s post below mine. He does a good job of explaining how it works.

Exactly.
And it doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand that the range i am (and 100% of the people who have a normal brain) talking about is 1. in Aesculus’s post (above your's).

So, it's clearly you who doesn't have a clue and like to repeat yourself for nothing.
 

Yinn

Active Member
Nov 15, 2016
2,100
1,919
Behind you
Because I (and many others) have been informing people for the past 5 years, incl. publicly on events etc, about, amongst others, EV best practices and it‘s astounding that the same questions and problems and whining (buhuu my battery has less miles that the other person) keep popping up. They are unbelievably persistent (and no one never cared about the gas gauge of the old cars being inaccurate as hell but if the car shows 1 mile less that yesterday then OMG). Some people just don‘t want to learn it seems. These best practices can be found everywhere now and still folks are too lazy to inform themselves. Like burning their fingers and then saying „nobody told me that fire is hot“. Guess i‘m just disappointed in humanity...

I couldn’t agree more on this.

It’s as if everyone forgot that on ICE, digital range read outs generally went from 25 miles left to 0 - because that’s how inaccurate they were.

Or that most people filled up once dropping below 1/4 of a tank, which means only 75% was usable for those folks. Or that we didn’t sit at the pump spending an hour trying to get every last drop in the filler to get 100% of fuel capacity - when it clicked it was “full” and we didn’t know if it was truly 100% or not.

Or that gas pumps pumped at different speeds, just like chargers charge at different speeds.

Or for those in cold weather, you’d end up with an ethanol blend and easily reduced mpg by 10%, comparable to losing range or increased wh/mi in an EV.

Or that degradation/reduction of range over time is unique to batteries. Spark plugs, fuel injectors, manifolds don’t foul up causing an inefficient burning cycle, increasing consumption, which reduces range. Admittedly easier and cheaper to change, than a battery pack. But transmissions, differentials, they wear too.

These things are so much of the same, but in different ways.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top