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Can the Model S handle being plugged into a 3-phase?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by PearlModelS, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. PearlModelS

    PearlModelS Member

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    Hi All,

    Sorry if this has been answered but I did do a search a could not find one.

    We have a NEMA 14-50 3-phase 480v 30a plug in my office that is available.

    Before I go plugging my P85 in, will the MS support this connection?

    I am not expecting the full 3-phase to kick in, I just want to make sure I don't short the car out if I plug it into the outlet.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    There's no such thing as a 3 phase NEMA 14-50 plug. It may get its power from a 3 phase source, but the plug itself will only get one (split) phase.

    You can plug into it with no problem whatsoever.
     
  3. PearlModelS

    PearlModelS Member

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    Thanks Doug.

    I guess that answers it. I will try next time I bring it to the office and let you know the results.
     
  4. Eberhard

    Eberhard #421 Model S #S32

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    #4 Eberhard, Mar 13, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2013
    the twin charger can handle 277V/480V. theoretically you can connect to two different phases (phase to neutral not phase to phase) and charge with 80A (2x40A). in the supercharger there are up to 12 single charger connected to 277V/480V to provide up to 120kW DC power. you may need a european type 2 mode 3 wall box.
     
  5. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    This is incorrect.

    If you are using the UMC plugged into a NEMA 14-50, the car is limited to 40A of charging at whatever voltage you're attached to, and will utilize a single charger just fine.

    Now, to the OP's question: it has been said that the chargers are indeed rated for 277V input, which would be line-to-neutral voltage on a 480Y/277 service. That said, you should never find that voltage on a NEMA 14-50. A NEMA 14-50 receptacle is a 240/120V or 208Y/120V receptacle and is not intended for higher voltage.

    If it is a NEMA 14-50 and you suspect it may not be 240/120, DO NOT PLUG IT IN. The UMC will attempt to take the L-L voltage from it, which is 480V and you will likely blow up the UMC and the car's chargers! Check the voltage first!

    You may have a NEMA L22 connector, which is a twist-lock, 3 phase 480Y/277 receptacle, but it certainly won't take a 14-50 plug.

    I suspect the car will charge okay if you used a NEMA 6-50 receptacle and connected the L-N to its L1-L2 terminals. In one configuration the UMC will likely show ground fault (like if 120V is reversed), in the other configuration it will likely work. Not recommended for beginners!

    - - - Updated - - -

    One other point - the car does fine when plugged into a 208Y/120 service (L-L on a 3-phase wye secondary), or a 240/120 center-tapped delta configuration source. I don't think anyone has tested the 277V except what we suspect the superchargers are doing (and then, the chargers are external anyway).
     
  6. Bipo

    Bipo Member

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    Interesting... So, under a 277 V source, you can get 11 kW with a single charger (or 22 kW with the twin chargers)?? It would work also under 480 V?? Or it would blow up :D
     
  7. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    It would likely blow up. The charger specs on Tesla's site say 85-265V, but others have reported that the chargers in the car and superchargers say the rating is valid to 277V. Since wire and trace size are based on current, yes, you could get 22 kW with twin chargers and an HPWC at 277V L-N off 480Y/277 service.
     
  8. bluetinc

    bluetinc Member

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    I would really recommend checking the voltage on the plug prior to plugging in the UMC. I did, once, run into 277 (281 V RMS measured) run to a 10-30 which was sitting on a 15A breaker...

    Peter
     

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