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Capacitive Electric Motor in the future?

Discussion in 'Future Cars' started by TD1, Sep 14, 2014.

  1. TD1

    TD1 Member

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    There have been some breakthroughts in the development of capactive electric motors.
    advatanges.
    -cheaper, use only aluminum instead of copper or other rare earth materials
    -higher efficiency, convert more electricity in movement energy
    -motors can be smaller and lighter then an comparable induction motors (Tesla uses such) with the same power output

    so really there are only advanteges, I hope someone can confront Elon with such a question at some point.

    Capacitive Power Coupler prototype demonstration - YouTube
     
  2. Rebel44

    Rebel44 Member

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    There is looooooong way between prototype demonstration and something that is ready for mass production.

    Also, current Tesla Model S motor doesnt (AFAIK) use any rare earth metals.
     
  3. Chris TX

    Chris TX Active Member

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    I wonder how this deals with ionization that's sure to occur in the air gap. If you thought brush dust was bad...
     
  4. liuping

    liuping Active Member

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    I'm pretty sure Elon does not need to be confronted by people from about new technologies posted on youtube...
     
  5. Tasdevil

    Tasdevil Member

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    I don't think he means confront. But just to ask the question and see what Elons take on this type of motor is. I'd certainly like to hear what he has to say.
     
  6. MacroP

    MacroP Member

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    The video is comparing an old school brushed motor to their own new design. Sure an old series DC motor is quite inefficient (maybe 65% as an example) comparatively speaking plus they have consumable parts other than bearings (the brushes and the slip rings potentially). Brushed motors are already well on their way to the path of the Dodo so it is somewhat pointless comparing a new design like this to them.

    Tesla nor any of modern EVs run a brushed design anyway. I scrapped brushed motors in my RC helis over a decade ago and have never looked back. This type of motor is already in mass production on a huge scale and already cheap even with their 'rare earth' magnets. Remember the term 'rare earth' is an over-used fallacy these days. Gold isn't classed as 'rare earth' but it certainly is. I don't expect any radials changes in electric motor design anytime soon because they run so well now. When modern AC induction (Tesla) and permanent magnet type brushless DC motors are currently running 90+% efficiency, your development is at point of diminishing returns.

    I'm pretty sure Tesla's R&D radar is on battery development more than anything. That is where the gains are to be had. Their motor and power electronics already work and work very well - no need for radial revolutionary change just evolutionary development to squeeze every last drop out of them.
     
  7. tga

    tga Active Member

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    OK, slip rings and brushes are bad. Got it. But how do you connect 2 sets of plates that are rotating relative to each other without them?

    Look at the video. At 4:07, the demo unit clearly has a brush and slip ring to transfer power to the rotating plate.
     
  8. jja

    jja Member

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    It's a capacitive power coupler, not a motor
     

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