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CHAdeMO adapter

ronmerkord

Member
Dec 25, 2013
93
24
Fillmore, CA
For all those interested in more charging options, I just confirmed with my DS today that the CHAdeMO to Tesla adapter is compatible with the Model X. This CHAdeMO DC fast charging adapter provides supercharger-like charging independent of the onboard 48A charger, and gives you access to a lot of additional DC chargers out there. While not as fast as a supercharger, as they are usually limited to 50KW or less, it does provide another charging option.

I ordered my adapter from Tesla today, in anticipation of our (hopefully) December delivery date.

Ron
SigX VIN #484
 

muleferg

Active Member
Dec 15, 2013
1,454
745
North Wilkesboro, NC
Smart move. Well worth the $.
IMG_1796.JPG
 
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O-G

Member
Oct 3, 2014
211
1
Tacoma, Wa
Does anyone know what it would take to install a CHAdeMO charger at a residence? What kind of amp draw would it require? Cost?
 

MichFin

Member
May 8, 2015
303
61
Detroit, MI
I can tell you I've never had a problem having to charge my car at 40 amps. That does about 30 miles per hour so from bone dry it would only take 9 hours.
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,028
1,017
Does anyone know what it would take to install a CHAdeMO charger at a residence? What kind of amp draw would it require? Cost?

There aren't that many out there, it appears that EMW has a unit that starts at a few thousand dollars.

In terms of amp draw... it depends upon the power. If you were to set up a 25 kW unit, you'd need 104A power just to put into the batteries. Then you'd have to consider the overhead of the charging units (probably 10-15%). My guess would be that you could configure a 150A circuit and get 25 kW from it. You'd probably need a minimum 25 kVA transformer and 400A service to your home.

Rough guesses, of course.

Anything larger (25+ kW) will likely require 3-phase power, which most won't have.
 

hiroshiy

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Apr 6, 2013
2,407
2,004
Tokyo, Japan
Does anyone know what it would take to install a CHAdeMO charger at a residence? What kind of amp draw would it require? Cost?

In Japan Nissan slim units are the cheapest but require three phase power. They are less than $10K. As others said they are not for residences but some more expensive units $20K-$30K can take single phase so they would work if you have appropriate wiring and contract.

If you only have single phase then the max would be 20-25kW range, which you can easily achieve with HPWC at 20kW.
CHAdeMO 25kW = only 50-60 amps output at 350-400V. So if your battery is low to medium full,
350 x 60 = 21kW of actual power.
 

O-G

Member
Oct 3, 2014
211
1
Tacoma, Wa
If you only have single phase then the max would be 20-25kW range, which you can easily achieve with HPWC at 20kW.
CHAdeMO 25kW = only 50-60 amps output at 350-400V. So if your battery is low to medium full,
350 x 60 = 21kW of actual power.

The unfortunate issue is that we are now dealing with the reduced charging ability of the MX. Even though I have a HPWC installed, max is now 12kW, 48 amps. If I can somehow switch to DC, then those limits are gone. That's what I am trying to compare. I have plenty of room on a 400 amp circuit. Single phase. If I can actually get 20-25kw DC, I've just cut my charging time in half. My other option is to install a 14-50 in the parking lot at work which I'm sure will be $2k-$3k or more since I would have to go underground. I would get more flexibility spending the same money on a home DC charger.
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,028
1,017
The unfortunate issue is that we are now dealing with the reduced charging ability of the MX. Even though I have a HPWC installed, max is now 12kW, 48 amps. If I can somehow switch to DC, then those limits are gone. That's what I am trying to compare. I have plenty of room on a 400 amp circuit. Single phase. If I can actually get 20-25kw DC, I've just cut my charging time in half. My other option is to install a 14-50 in the parking lot at work which I'm sure will be $2k-$3k or more since I would have to go underground. I would get more flexibility spending the same money on a home DC charger.

I think prices are getting better at this point but it's still a much, much larger investment... the EMW high-voltage 25 kW box with CHAdeMO controller and cable would be $4,197 before tax and shipping and installation. You would require a 150-amp breaker and would need to feed it with 1/0 conductors, #6 ground (all CU) in a minimum 1.25" conduit. Figure (roughly) about $5-8/foot for parts & installation + $100 for breaker plus permit & inspection fees. Some panels require that 4 spaces be used for 150A vs. 2 (CH, for example), so you'd definitely need room (and in your load calcs too).
 

David99

Active Member
Jan 31, 2014
4,850
7,028
Brea, Orange County
Slightly OT, but this charger allows DC input which allows it to to charge at 35 kW. That is 3.6 times faster than the current single charger of the Model S, and a little more than 3 times faster than the Model X single charger. Of course the tricky part is needing a very strong DC input.
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,028
1,017
Slightly OT, but this charger allows DC input which allows it to to charge at 35 kW. That is 3.6 times faster than the current single charger of the Model S, and a little more than 3 times faster than the Model X single charger. Of course the tricky part is needing a very strong DC input.

That's the same one we're talking about. You need it, plus the CHAdeMO controller board ($700) plus the CHAdeMO cordset ($900) - for a total of $4,197.
 

Nigel Tufnel

Member
Oct 3, 2013
171
30
SF Bay Area
I'm not an EE, nor the brightest bulb in the chandelier, so maybe someone can take the time to explain what I'm missing here? Essentially everyone has, or can get 220V at their home. Essentially everyone sleeps, most of us at night when electricity rates are often cheap. Essentially everyone has a UMC or can get one. And when one travels, essentially everyone can choose a route that has a supercharging station along the way.

When I wake up each morning the car has 260+ miles. No trip longer than that has ever been a problem except once in 2 years on a Barstow to Vegas stretch (who knew uphill at 75mph threw off the old range calculator?), and that problem has been remedied.

And my girlfriend charges exclusively at 110V and says she "doesn't need to put in 220V service."

Note: Both of us are senior citizens, so it won't be the first time we've missed something in our thinking process. :smile:
 

MorrisonHiker

S 100D 2021.32.20
Mar 8, 2015
10,144
9,664
Colorado
And when one travels, essentially everyone can choose a route that has a supercharging station along the way.

If you look at the Supercharger map, you'll see that outside of California, Superchargers can be few and far between. Many states still don't have any Superchargers and there are several other states that only have a few on select routes. Yes, someone could stay on the interstates and use Superchargers but it could add detours of hundreds, if not thousands of miles. Imagine a route from Hays, KS to Murdo, SD. While that route is only 394 miles on the most direct route, it would more than double to 871 miles if you route through Superchargers. Eventually, they'll add a Supercharger around North Platte, NE and the more direct 394 mile route will be possible.

Also, sometimes it's nice to get off the interstates. I've lived in Colorado for over 20 years but for most of that time, the vast majority of my driving was on I-25 and I-70. A few years ago, I made it a goal to get off the beaten path and drove over 5000 miles around the state, visiting all 65 counties, all 4 state corners and every page of the Delorme Colorado atlas. I saw many amazing sites that aren't anywhere near an interstate. While we do have several Superchargers in Colorado today, the trip is still not possible in a Tesla using only Superchargers.
 
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David99

Active Member
Jan 31, 2014
4,850
7,028
Brea, Orange County
That's the same one we're talking about. You need it, plus the CHAdeMO controller board ($700) plus the CHAdeMO cordset ($900) - for a total of $4,197.

The cost would be OK if that was the end of it, but to get the 35 kW you'd need a very large battery as a DC source. A Tesla Power Pack would be great. LOL
 

Beryl

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Feb 19, 2015
681
232
South of Houston
I'm not an EE, nor the brightest bulb in the chandelier, so maybe someone can take the time to explain what I'm missing here? Essentially everyone has, or can get 220V at their home. Essentially everyone sleeps, most of us at night when electricity rates are often cheap. Essentially everyone has a UMC or can get one. And when one travels, essentially everyone can choose a route that has a supercharging station along the way.

When I wake up each morning the car has 260+ miles. No trip longer than that has ever been a problem except once in 2 years on a Barstow to Vegas stretch (who knew uphill at 75mph threw off the old range calculator?), and that problem has been remedied.

And my girlfriend charges exclusively at 110V and says she "doesn't need to put in 220V service."

Note: Both of us are senior citizens, so it won't be the first time we've missed something in our thinking process. :smile:

I don't even have my Tesla yet but I've had a lot of time to research because I don't live and travel in heavy SC areas. I've been mapping out charging possibilities throughout Texas, Colorado, Virginia, to Minnesota.

1. Where SCs are sparse (the center of the country) one charger might not be operational so you need backup plans. It is not as easy as finding another gas station.

2. Some people actually drive over 150 miles each day.

3. Everyone doesn't have 8-10 hours of down time. Some only have 4 hours to recharge their human batteries before taking off again. (Think physicians and others on-call.)

Hope this helps.
 

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