Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • Want to remove ads? Register an account and login to see fewer ads, and become a Supporting Member to remove almost all ads.
  • The final cut of TMC Podcast #29 is available now with topics time-stamped. We discussed the Tesla Cybertruck's expected 1 MW Ultra-Fast Charging capability, the Tesla Semi Delivery Event, the coming Model 3 refresh (project "Highland"), and more. You can watch it now on YouTube.

ChargeFox EV charging Network

Vostok

Active Member
Jul 1, 2017
2,635
3,070
Sydney
All the card does is send a 32-bit number - if it matches the one in your account, and there is a payment system set up, you should be good to go. If Evie cards work on Chargefox, they are not checking the numbers for validity in any other way.
That is very weak “security” if that’s the case. So if you randomly create a virtual RFID tag code that happens to be associated with someone else’s account, you get free electricity?
 

Vostok

Active Member
Jul 1, 2017
2,635
3,070
Sydney
It takes so long to try a number out, you would quickly tire of trying all 2^32 of them...
My RFID card only has an 8 digit number on it. OK, that’s still 100 million combinations, but way short of 4.3 billion. Also you wouldn’t need to try every number, you only need to try until you guessed one that was linked to an account.

If every household in Australia had one RFID card linked to Chargefox (OK, this is an EV nirvana future :D), you’d only need to guess a median of 9 times. More than do-able.

If randomness is the sole security measure, something of the order of 1 chance in a decillion would be more appropriate, and would cost nothing extra.
 

moa999

2020 3 SR+ MSM
Mar 4, 2020
2,425
2,527
Sydney, AUS
I've just noticed that RACV Solar have installed a charging station at their showroom in Bairnsdale, they don't say what output it has but it operates through the Chargefox network, looks like only one charger so could be busy during long weekends etc.

Listed in Chargefox app as Type 2 (so AC) - 22kw (so 3 phase, 32A).
So not a rapid charger
 

cafz

Active Member
Jul 17, 2020
1,406
1,454
Australia
This is interesting from Chargefox, showing the utilisation of the battery at the Goulburn site when supporting total charging loads several times in excess of the site's grid connection capacity: Evan Beaver on LinkedIn: #PowerCache #evcharging #batteryenergystorage

1615703060536
 
  • Like
Reactions: Hairyman

miimura

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2013
7,400
7,404
Los Altos, CA
This is interesting from Chargefox, showing the utilisation of the battery at the Goulburn site when supporting total charging loads several times in excess of the site's grid connection capacity: Evan Beaver on LinkedIn: #PowerCache #evcharging #batteryenergystorage
Do you know what the site's grid connection capacity actually is? There are some spikes where the "Power Network" curve goes above 100kW. That's excellent when the site is drawing more than 200kW. However, I would be surprised if the grid connection is less than 300kW.
 
Do you know what the site's grid connection capacity actually is? There are some spikes where the "Power Network" curve goes above 100kW. That's excellent when the site is drawing more than 200kW. However, I would be surprised if the grid connection is less than 300kW.
It’s probably still 180kW, of which the other users need 30kW. That’s what it was on day one. They could have paid to upgrade the grid but a battery solution is better and more socially responsible.

 

miimura

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2013
7,400
7,404
Los Altos, CA
It’s probably still 180kW, of which the other users need 30kW. That’s what it was on day one. They could have paid to upgrade the grid but a battery solution is better and more socially responsible.

Based on the article, they must have a way to prevent the Tritium chargers from all going full bore at the same time. They have 180kW grid plus 250kW battery output. So, the aggregate must stay below 430kW even though they have a total 750kW nameplate of chargers installed.
 
Based on the article, they must have a way to prevent the Tritium chargers from all going full bore at the same time. They have 180kW grid plus 250kW battery output. So, the aggregate must stay below 430kW even though they have a total 750kW nameplate of chargers installed.
I’m sure that’s possible. How could it know to stop at 500 amps? Surely it could just as easily limit itself to a lower output.

But it shouldn’t matter. Daytimes the solar system should output plenty. And if they ever charged 2 x 350kW-capable cars at once, simultaneously, so the peak load for both hits that speed simultaneously, I’d be surprised.
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top