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Charging in and around National Parks

We are just back from a 2,000 mile trip which included several National Parks in Arizona. In fact, the plan was to also include visiting parks in Utah and California but we decided not to, as the Superchargers distribution leading to those parks was insufficient to build our confidence and reduce our range anxiety.
My car is a 3.5 years old standard Model 3 with less than the promised maximum charge level, around 240 miles (*).

I know that this thorny subject of limited chargers around the parks has come up here many times over the years, but I hope to start a ground swell of anxious Tesla owners, and apply pressure on Tesla to improve the situation.

President Biden recently announced a charger infrastructure plan of adding 100,000 chargers in the US.
We, the Tesla users, must make sure that some of those (Superchargers of course) will be built in strategic locations leading to, and from, National Parks. I think that a the Federal Interior Department (Infrastructure), the National Park system (encourage visitors to the parks), Tesla (sell and monetize more superchargers), Tesla user groups (do I need to say more?), Local utilities (promoting use of electricity by EV's) and private/commercial developers (make money by selling electricity as well as food and lodging services around the chargers), can come together and ease the situation in a matter of few months.

(*) regrading maximum charge:
One of the more annoying issues is the charge range limit set by Tesla in busy superchargers.
In my case, I got the message "your max charge allowed now is 190 miles", instead of my usual max of 240. I needed to cross the Arizona desert at 120 degrees F with strong headwind, while the next charger (along highway I-40) is 150 miles away, this is not a joke. (well OK, we made it).

By the way-
Thank you Tesla. Upon my return I've just installed the newest software version which includes “Energy prediction for your route has been improved by incorporating forecasted crosswind, headwind, humidity and ambient temperature when using online navigation.”
A quote from Electek: "While these factors could only account for a few percentage points of difference, it can be a big deal for some trips. Every percentage point counts when doing efficiency and range calculations".
Kudus.
 

Big Earl

bnkwupt
Supporting Member
Jul 12, 2017
7,345
14,715
Springfield, VA
We are just back from a 2,000 mile trip which included several National Parks in Arizona. In fact, the plan was to also include visiting parks in Utah and California but we decided not to, as the Superchargers distribution leading to those parks was insufficient to build our confidence and reduce our range anxiety.
My car is a 3.5 years old standard Model 3 with less than the promised maximum charge level, around 240 miles (*).

I know that this thorny subject of limited chargers around the parks has come up here many times over the years, but I hope to start a ground swell of anxious Tesla owners, and apply pressure on Tesla to improve the situation.

President Biden recently announced a charger infrastructure plan of adding 100,000 chargers in the US.
We, the Tesla users, must make sure that some of those (Superchargers of course) will be built in strategic locations leading to, and from, National Parks. I think that a the Federal Interior Department (Infrastructure), the National Park system (encourage visitors to the parks), Tesla (sell and monetize more superchargers), Tesla user groups (do I need to say more?), Local utilities (promoting use of electricity by EV's) and private/commercial developers (make money by selling electricity as well as food and lodging services around the chargers), can come together and ease the situation in a matter of few months.

(*) regrading maximum charge:
One of the more annoying issues is the charge range limit set by Tesla in busy superchargers.
In my case, I got the message "your max charge allowed now is 190 miles", instead of my usual max of 240. I needed to cross the Arizona desert at 120 degrees F with strong headwind, while the next charger (along highway I-40) is 150 miles away, this is not a joke. (well OK, we made it).

By the way-
Thank you Tesla. Upon my return I've just installed the newest software version which includes “Energy prediction for your route has been improved by incorporating forecasted crosswind, headwind, humidity and ambient temperature when using online navigation.”
A quote from Electek: "While these factors could only account for a few percentage points of difference, it can be a big deal for some trips. Every percentage point counts when doing efficiency and range calculations".
Kudus.

The 80% limit imposed at busy stations can be overridden if you need more energy. Just drag the charging limit slider back above 80% after you start charging.
 

Nosken

Active Member
Jan 15, 2015
1,111
1,109
Lincoln, CA
At the times the high occupancy chargers give you that message, you simply move your charge back to the level you needed. Some report, it resets, but just do it again. Many National Parks are installing J1774 and remember, if they have RV hook ups, you can use a 1450 adapter.
Make sure the next Tesla you get is the long range model. Many newer Teslas support CCS charger, and that can help in many cases. Get to know ABetterRoutePlanner.com and PlugShare.com
 

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